Travel

Brining cigars back form usa

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 13th, 2017 6:00 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 9, 2010
7 posts
canada14

Brining cigars back form usa

Was going down to the us for a week and was wondering if anyone has ever brought cigars back. I was reading and believe i can bring up to 50 cigars back since I'm gone for more then 48hrs. But then its saying if it not stamped Canadian Duty I would have to pay a fee? Anyone have experience with this?

Thanks
2 replies
Sr. Member
Feb 7, 2017
729 posts
384 upvotes
Ya need to read the whole section on Tobacco Products to fully understand how it works:

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/travel-voyag ... e-eng.html

Tobacco products

You can speed up your clearance by having your tobacco products available for inspection when you arrive.

Whether they are stamped or unstamped, if you bring in tobacco products that exceed your personal exemption, you will be required to pay the regular duty and taxes as well as any provincial or territorial levies that apply on the excess amount.

Note: You must be 18 years of age to bring tobacco products into Canada under your personal exemption.

Stamped Tobacco Products – Personal exemption amounts

If you wish to import cigarettes, manufactured tobacco and tobacco sticks duty free as part of your personal exemption, the packages must be stamped "duty paid Canada droit acquitté". You will find tobacco products sold at duty-free stores marked this way.

If you have been away from Canada for 48 hours or more, you may import all of the following amounts of cigars and stamped tobacco into Canada free of duty and taxes.

Product & Amount
Cigarettes = 200 cigarettes
Cigars = 50 cigars
Tobacco = 200 grams (7 ounces) of manufactured tobacco
Tobacco sticks = 200 tobacco sticks

Unstamped Tobacco Products – Special duties rate

A special duty rate applies to cigarettes, manufactured tobacco and tobacco sticks that are not stamped "duty paid Canada droit acquitté".

For example, if you claim a carton of 200 cigarettes as part of your personal exemption and it is not stamped "duty paid Canada droit acquitté", you will be assessed at a special duty rate.

Unstamped Tobacco Products – Import limits

In addition to your personal exemption amounts, there are limits on the quantity of tobacco products that may be imported if it is not packaged and not stamped "duty paid Canada droit acquitté". The limit is currently five units of tobacco products. One unit of tobacco products consists of one of the following:

Product & Amount
Cigarettes = 200 cigarettes
Cigars = 50 cigars
Tobacco = 200 grams (7 ounces) of manufactured tobacco
Tobacco sticks = 200 tobacco sticks
Plain English.

Section 1 - How to qualify

Section 2

There is always a Duty imposed on Tobacco imported into Canada, even that brought in under your Personal Exemption.

If you buy your Tobacco Products at a Duty Free Store (airport - land crossing) then you've already paid that Duty as part of the pricing, and the products will be stamped as such.

If you have been out of the country 48 hours or more, and buy stamped Duty Paid tobacco products at a Duty Free Store, then you can bring back the allowable amounts from ALL 4 categories if you so desire.

Section 3

If you buy your Tobacco Products anywhere but from a Duty Free Store, you will have to pay that Duty at the Border.

In your Personal Exemption, there is a Special Rate of Duty for all Tobacco Products (except Cigars)

Section 4

Being out of the country 48 Hours or more, and you can bring in ADDITIONAL amounts of Tobacco Products and pay Duty to do so. The allowance is for 5 Additional Units of Tobacco Products.
.
.
.

So what this means for you:

Being out of the country 48 or more hours you can buy 50 Cigars and claim them under your Personal Exemption. If you buy them at Duty Free, you are set to go. If you buy them elsewhere you will be accessed Duty at the Point of Entry.

Plus you can import up to 5 additional tobacco units, but will be accessed Duty for that overage.
.
.
.
SIDE NOTE - For anyone travelling to Cuba. In addition to the above, Cuba has its own rules for Export. So one is subject to those before leaving Cuba, and then the Canadian Customs Rules (above) when enterring Canada. Make sure you are good to go on both fronts. Suggest ya read up BEFORE purchasing.
Deal Fanatic
May 29, 2006
8153 posts
1226 upvotes
I brought cigars from Cuba, border guards don't check, I declared them, but they don't examine them to check for duty stamps. even when I'm over the limit I have never had to pay anything,

Top