Cell Phones

Buying phones on Kijiji - Blacklisted

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 10th, 2018 11:31 pm
Deal Fanatic
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May 17, 2006
5486 posts
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GTA
kevdanga wrote:
Jan 18th, 2018 3:35 am
Yup, not something I'd give over email.
then how would you confirm, for a buyer if you are not forthcoming then the buyer would move on and assume its a scam.
Newbie
Nov 3, 2009
14 posts
9 upvotes
Mississauga
porksoda wrote:
Jan 19th, 2018 1:09 am
then how would you confirm, for a buyer if you are not forthcoming then the buyer would move on and assume its a scam.
Exactly; similar to condition 1.a) - move on.
So far, nobody ever replied that they can't give me the IMEI. Either I got no reply, or I got an IMEI.
Better to risk losing a good deal than risk loosing your money...
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May 17, 2006
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csmede wrote:
Jan 19th, 2018 2:11 pm
Exactly; similar to condition 1.a) - move on.
So far, nobody ever replied that they can't give me the IMEI. Either I got no reply, or I got an IMEI.
Better to risk losing a good deal than risk loosing your money...
exactly, i am not sure why seller need to be so apprehensive they have nothing to lose as they get cash and not a postdated cheque.
Newbie
Jul 10, 2012
7 posts
CALGARY
For those of you holding onto blacklisted phones, you may want to rerun the IMEI against the blacklist again. I had one that was on the blacklist for 3 years, and just this month it's showing up as clean and will register on both Roger's and Koodo's networks with SIM cards.
It was previously registered on the blacklist by Koodo for non-payment of the subsidy.
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Jun 23, 2005
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csmede wrote:
Jan 17th, 2018 12:38 pm
I got burned back in 2013 buying a blacklisted phone on Kijiji. I needed the phone mostly when travelling in the US. It was a Tmo S3, that I was going to use with a Tmo prepaid. Well, I found out it was blacklisted so I could not use it in the US. I sold it back in Canada (there was no black list here) and moved on. As a result, I didn't buy phones from kijiji for a few years.
However, last year I decided to give it a try again. This time, I had no issue. However, I was extremely cautious. Here are the steps you should follow, in order:

Step 1. You see a deal you like. Reply to the user and ask him/her to give you the IMEI of the phone (always mention in your reply that the imei can be obtained by dialing *#06#). Check the IMEI in a variety of sites, not just against the Canadian blacklist. Use sites like imei.info, imeipro.info, etc (do a google search on imei checkers). You will glean useful info regarding the phone, like country of origin (then run an imei check in that country), day of manufacture, exact model number, features, etc. There are five possible outcomes from this 1st step:
1.a) No reply; that means either the phone is sold and the guy ignores any further messages, or he knows there is something wrong with the phone; move on;
1.b) IMEI shows the device is not blacklisted but is an international model; there is a risk the device is stolen from another country; but that means the device cannot be blocked in Canada. So overall there is a low risk in buying these devices, but remember, if you travel to the country where the device comes from, it may not work there. As a matter of principle, I decided to pass on an s7 edge coming from the middle east because I'm against buying things that may be stolen;
1.c) IMEI is invalid or does not correspond to the device model you're looking at: device is almost 100% stolen and blacklisted and to bring it back into the market, they changed the IMEI to that of an older phone or to a random number. The risk is very low: device will work and will never be blacklisted. However, as a matter of principle, I would pass on these stolen devices;
1.d) Valid IMEI corresponds to the device; pursue this further to step #2;
1.e) Device is blacklisted; run!

Before I go to step #2, let me give you a breakdown on the ~9 devices that I looked up on Kijiji: two belonged to case 1.a, one belonged to case 1.b, 3 belonged to case 1.c and 3 belonged to case 1.d; no device was blacklisted;

Step 2. I'm against buying potentially stolen devices, but If you decide to buy devices that correspond to Steps 1.b and 1.c, you are pretty safe, so you may not need to go to Step 2.
2.a) If seller suggests to meet in a public place like a mall, bank, etc, or is willing to come to your home, run away. A guy knowingly selling a blocked device or a device that he knows will get blocked will not want the buyer to know where he lives; unfortunately, you may weed out a few honest sellers in the process;
2.b) Seller gives you his address; show up prepared, test the device with your sim card, test the camera, sd card reader, audio (earpiece, speaker, earbuds), play a video, etc. Be creative and exhaustive. Ask about the original owner. Call the carrier the device was activated with; in my case, I did that before showing up at the guy's house. The device had been activated with Rogers; the operator was unwilling to share any personal information (duh!), but when specifically asked if there is any trouble with the device (like unpaid bills), she said no, I can buy it safely. Remember, YMMV on this, it depends on the operator.

So now you bought the device.

Step 3. In case the device gets blacklisted sometime down the road; this would be very unfair to you. The police won't help you. However, there are now a bunch of places that can change your phone IMEI for as low as $15. I'm against doing this on a stolen phone. But if you honestly bought the phone and the guy declares it stolen to get insurance money, then you are justified to follow this step to get back what you legally paid for.

Feel free to comment and/or add to these recommendations. Happy buying!
I think dismissing anyone who wants to meet up in a public place is a bit extreme. People do this for safety reasons for both parties. For the buyer, they are showing up at a place with a significant sum of $$, so there is a certain vulnerability there in terms of getting jumped/ripped off, etc. if they are showing up at a stranger's house. This is why there are even designated places at police stations where you can conduct transactions. Not to say that this cannot happen in a public area, but given that there are going to be more people around in a restaurant, mall, etc., it is not as likely to happen, unless you are meeting late at night somewhere where there are fewer people.

Likewise, as a seller, I don't want potential buyers to be coming to my house not because I am ripping them off, but because they are people I have just come into contact with, don't know very well, and who knows, could be planning a robbery/home invasion or what have you. Assuming that that is a rare possibility, leaving that aside, I have heard stories of people coming back to people's homes later on when they are having some problems with the item they bought - sorry I am not a repair centre. Items bought through Kijiji etc. are generally "as is, where is", and blacklisting issues aside, there is always a risk that something could go wrong after the transaction has been completed/down the road. These issues are on the buyer to resolve (whether the item has warranty or not). Unfortunately, not all buyers understand this. Most people are reasonable, but I would not want to risk giving out my address on the off chance I end up running into that one nutcase buyer who is insistent that I refund their money because I "ripped them off", when in fact that couldn't be any further from the truth.
Newbie
Feb 11, 2018
3 posts
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Edmonton
I think the best way is ask seller to provide proff of purchase. Incase it gets blacklisted , you can always un blacklist.
Deal Guru
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Feb 24, 2003
12977 posts
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Toronto
Proof of purchase will not necessarily help get the phone removed from the blacklist.
Sr. Member
Jul 7, 2013
992 posts
529 upvotes
North York
Anyone had experience with the kijiji phone plans? The range for cost of service varies but their plans are quite similar... Very competitive!
Many claim not to require id and payment after service is complete but my main concern is the longevity of the plans and whether or not it's legit.
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Mar 25, 2003
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Some people got scammed
some people got stuck with out of province #
these-plans-legit-2164163/#p28823137
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Jan 20, 2012
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LONDON
xblackrainbow wrote:
Feb 16th, 2018 9:13 pm
Anyone had experience with the kijiji phone plans? The range for cost of service varies but their plans are quite similar... Very competitive!
Many claim not to require id and payment after service is complete but my main concern is the longevity of the plans and whether or not it's legit.
If you're talking about the Rogers SK plans, I wouldn't roll the dice. Some say they can port the number over, some can't and they'll stick you with an out-of-province number. If you're okay with a different number, then you're probably safe and heck, you could probably do it yourself. Porting the ON number I've heard is next to impossible, and if you do, it'll only be a matter of time before they catch you.
Koodo's exploit though is a known solution. But don't pay the guys on Kijiji to do it. It's so easy to do, and there's plenty of instructions online.
csmede wrote:
Jan 17th, 2018 12:38 pm
I got burned back in 2013 buying a blacklisted phone on Kijiji. I needed the phone mostly when travelling in the US. It was a Tmo S3, that I was going to use with a Tmo prepaid. Well, I found out it was blacklisted so I could not use it in the US. I sold it back in Canada (there was no black list here) and moved on. As a result, I didn't buy phones from kijiji for a few years.
However, last year I decided to give it a try again. This time, I had no issue. However, I was extremely cautious. Here are the steps you should follow, in order:

Step 1. You see a deal you like. Reply to the user and ask him/her to give you the IMEI of the phone (always mention in your reply that the imei can be obtained by dialing *#06#). Check the IMEI in a variety of sites, not just against the Canadian blacklist. Use sites like imei.info, imeipro.info, etc (do a google search on imei checkers). You will glean useful info regarding the phone, like country of origin (then run an imei check in that country), day of manufacture, exact model number, features, etc. There are five possible outcomes from this 1st step:
1.a) No reply; that means either the phone is sold and the guy ignores any further messages, or he knows there is something wrong with the phone; move on;
1.b) IMEI shows the device is not blacklisted but is an international model; there is a risk the device is stolen from another country; but that means the device cannot be blocked in Canada. So overall there is a low risk in buying these devices, but remember, if you travel to the country where the device comes from, it may not work there. As a matter of principle, I decided to pass on an s7 edge coming from the middle east because I'm against buying things that may be stolen;
1.c) IMEI is invalid or does not correspond to the device model you're looking at: device is almost 100% stolen and blacklisted and to bring it back into the market, they changed the IMEI to that of an older phone or to a random number. The risk is very low: device will work and will never be blacklisted. However, as a matter of principle, I would pass on these stolen devices;
1.d) Valid IMEI corresponds to the device; pursue this further to step #2;
1.e) Device is blacklisted; run!

Before I go to step #2, let me give you a breakdown on the ~9 devices that I looked up on Kijiji: two belonged to case 1.a, one belonged to case 1.b, 3 belonged to case 1.c and 3 belonged to case 1.d; no device was blacklisted;

Step 2. I'm against buying potentially stolen devices, but If you decide to buy devices that correspond to Steps 1.b and 1.c, you are pretty safe, so you may not need to go to Step 2.
2.a) If seller suggests to meet in a public place like a mall, bank, etc, or is willing to come to your home, run away. A guy knowingly selling a blocked device or a device that he knows will get blocked will not want the buyer to know where he lives; unfortunately, you may weed out a few honest sellers in the process;
2.b) Seller gives you his address; show up prepared, test the device with your sim card, test the camera, sd card reader, audio (earpiece, speaker, earbuds), play a video, etc. Be creative and exhaustive. Ask about the original owner. Call the carrier the device was activated with; in my case, I did that before showing up at the guy's house. The device had been activated with Rogers; the operator was unwilling to share any personal information (duh!), but when specifically asked if there is any trouble with the device (like unpaid bills), she said no, I can buy it safely. Remember, YMMV on this, it depends on the operator.

So now you bought the device.

Step 3. In case the device gets blacklisted sometime down the road; this would be very unfair to you. The police won't help you. However, there are now a bunch of places that can change your phone IMEI for as low as $15. I'm against doing this on a stolen phone. But if you honestly bought the phone and the guy declares it stolen to get insurance money, then you are justified to follow this step to get back what you legally paid for.

Feel free to comment and/or add to these recommendations. Happy buying!
I would never meet at my house again. Doesn't make me a scammer.
I used to do it all the time, and only ran into one issue where a phone I sold (second owner) got blacklisted 6 months down the road after I sold it (assuming previous owner before me didn't pay their bill), and the buyer showed up to my house unwarranted demanding I give the money back or he'll call the police. Told him to get off my property or I'll be calling them, and that it wasn't my problem. 24 hours after that, I kept getting calls from random numbers, and assumed it was him..
Not even a week later, at 4 am, we had a good sized rock thrown through our bay window, and caused a lot of damage to our house. Police never caught the guy and wouldn't press charges against this guy even though i pointed out that this was targeted and not random.

Since then, I haven't had a single person meet me at my house unless it's to pick up stuff I'm giving away, or if it's a dirt cheap item. Phones or electronics, nope. Public place only. and I use a texting app and don't give out my real phone number. Many people do this already. It doesn't make them all criminals, they're trying to protect themselves. Don't judge.
Please do not PM me with requests for assistance, unless I PM you first, or if I give you permission to. That's what the forums are for!
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
6662 posts
563 upvotes
Toronto
Interesting thread!

But, as always, there is another side to the story: the honest seller trying to sell a genuine phone and scared of being ripped off.

I'm selling an iPhone at the moment (listed on Craigslist, Kijiji and here on BST). 90% of responses on CL and Kijiji have been ripoff attempts, 5% have been low ball offers and 5% have been serious. I offer to meet buyers at a service provider kiosk or store location of their choice so that they can verify that the phone is not on a blacklist or doesn't have any outstanding commitment associated with it. Also willing to meet at, for example, a restaurant where the buyer can check the IMEI and set up the phone while I'm there. I have no problem showing my DL if it makes the buyer comfortable. I'd also be happy to do the deal at my place but no buyer has taken me up on that offer.
Member
May 30, 2017
378 posts
101 upvotes
Streetsville, Missis…
Jimbobs wrote:
Mar 27th, 2018 12:19 am
Interesting thread!

But, as always, there is another side to the story: the honest seller trying to sell a genuine phone and scared of being ripped off.

I'm selling an iPhone at the moment (listed on Craigslist, Kijiji and here on BST). 90% of responses on CL and Kijiji have been ripoff attempts, 5% have been low ball offers and 5% have been serious. I offer to meet buyers at a service provider kiosk or store location of their choice so that they can verify that the phone is not on a blacklist or doesn't have any outstanding commitment associated with it. Also willing to meet at, for example, a restaurant where the buyer can check the IMEI and set up the phone while I'm there. I have no problem showing my DL if it makes the buyer comfortable. I'd also be happy to do the deal at my place but no buyer has taken me up on that offer.
Forget Kijiji. Use Facebook Marketplace. Yes, I know Facebook is in a lot of trouble now. But FB Marketplace is probably the best place to sell used electronics because everyone there is so naive. No questions asked, they'll just come to your place, hand over the money and leave.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
6662 posts
563 upvotes
Toronto
cellnerd wrote:
Mar 28th, 2018 3:42 pm
Forget Kijiji. Use Facebook Marketplace. Yes, I know Facebook is in a lot of trouble now. But FB Marketplace is probably the best place to sell used electronics because everyone there is so naive. No questions asked, they'll just come to your place, hand over the money and leave.
That's worth a try-out. It's a genuine sale with no gotchas so just need to reach genuine buyers.
Newbie
Nov 3, 2009
14 posts
9 upvotes
Mississauga
kellmike626 wrote:
Mar 14th, 2018 10:49 am
I would never meet at my house again. Doesn't make me a scammer.
I used to do it all the time, and only ran into one issue where a phone I sold (second owner) got blacklisted 6 months down the road after I sold it (assuming previous owner before me didn't pay their bill), and the buyer showed up to my house unwarranted demanding I give the money back or he'll call the police. Told him to get off my property or I'll be calling them, and that it wasn't my problem. 24 hours after that, I kept getting calls from random numbers, and assumed it was him..
Not even a week later, at 4 am, we had a good sized rock thrown through our bay window, and caused a lot of damage to our house. Police never caught the guy and wouldn't press charges against this guy even though i pointed out that this was targeted and not random.

Since then, I haven't had a single person meet me at my house unless it's to pick up stuff I'm giving away, or if it's a dirt cheap item. Phones or electronics, nope. Public place only. and I use a texting app and don't give out my real phone number. Many people do this already. It doesn't make them all criminals, they're trying to protect themselves. Don't judge.
No one is making you a scammer. However, your buyer was screwed, even though it was not your fault; and as a buyer, I don't really care whose fault it is.
Therefore, I stand by my statement: for smartphones, avoid meeting people in public places and hiding their identity. There is a risk involved.
Newbie
Sep 23, 2006
75 posts
16 upvotes
Vancouver
Thanks for the Bill of Sale HBP...don't you mean "Seller Name & Address" as the Buyer you know who you are :)

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