Cell Phones

Buying phones on Kijiji - Blacklisted

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 4th, 2017 2:29 pm
Newbie
Jan 8, 2017
9 posts
3 upvotes
Nope, you're wrong. Blacklisting it after the effect is equivalent to declaring it stolen after selling it. It's still fraud, regardless of whether your malice was before or after the sale.

Whether the police are willing to investigate or not really depends on your locale. I wouldn't expect them to get involved in Toronto...but smaller municipalities, you may be able to find a sympathetic ear.

If you can find the identity of the thief, you can take them to small claims court to recoup your money. (hence the need to try to get real contact information).

Additionally...I'm thinking this happens very rare indeed...what would be the point in having something blacklisted after the fact - except to run the risk of getting yourself into trouble??? Pointless and immature.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
May 17, 2006
5013 posts
790 upvotes
GTA
One thing i am not clear about and perhaps someone has had some experience with is phones that are bought outright. Whether it is iphone or android, how does one go about blacklisting those as they are not part of any carrier inventory. From what i gather that phones bought outright from Apple cannot be blacklisted if they have never been activated? I assume at the point if insurance was involved and serial number was provided the insurance can get it blacklisted but no other recourse.
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We Shall Never Forget 7/08 '14
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Toilet Paper Calculations Thread
Member
Oct 25, 2005
274 posts
105 upvotes
OpenMobile wrote:
Oct 14th, 2017 8:28 pm
Having a phone blacklisted after selling it is fraud (it's the equivalent to stealing). The police can subpoena the cell records from the carrier and the e-mail records from the mail poster and the associated ISP when they view the mail headers.

As for what to do with blacklisted devices that you DID purchase from the rightful owner? Once the police have been involved they should be able to get the carrier to have the blacklist cleared.
Are you joking?

Police would NEVER bother to subpoena cell records for this (they will not even get involved, will tell you to take it up in Civil Court)
Fraud would never be charged, much less proven

And even if you had their info, you would now be out another $500 or so dollars just to file the claim and try to enforce it
Only person who can unblacklist the phone is the person who reported it. Police again have nothing to with this.

Cut your losses and move on, not worth it
OpenMobile wrote:
Oct 24th, 2017 2:24 pm
Nope, you're wrong. Blacklisting it after the effect is equivalent to declaring it stolen after selling it. It's still fraud, regardless of whether your malice was before or after the sale.

Whether the police are willing to investigate or not really depends on your locale. I wouldn't expect them to get involved in Toronto...but smaller municipalities, you may be able to find a sympathetic ear.
Although I do not doubt in a small town an officer would be far more likely to talk to someone, unless that person is an idiot they do not need to answer anything.
Officer has nothing to charge them with.

Your legal definition is way off base as well. Fraud itself is not defined in Criminal Code, but the "malice" you refer to MUST be before the sale.
Once sale is completed, if he suddenly wakes up next morning deciding to screw you over (no idea why but for theory) this is in no way fraud
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 6, 2004
3769 posts
340 upvotes
Scarborough
Happened to me. Bought an iPhone 7+. Two months later, the phone lost reception. Checked the imei database and it was blacklisted. Kept the texts and contacted the seller. He said he did declare it lost for the Fido insurance money. He was puzzled why the carrier was able to block... very stupid person. He gave back the money without any hassle, cuz he wanted to “f the system”, not random people.
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Jr. Member
User avatar
Oct 24, 2016
148 posts
97 upvotes
ON
You can consider yourself extremely lucky. Otherwise with this blacklisting thing, buying off random people has become very risky unless you’re lucky or do your due diligence.
Isn't it great to live in the 21st century where deleting history has become more important than making it.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
May 17, 2006
5013 posts
790 upvotes
GTA
Holystone wrote:
Oct 30th, 2017 10:29 am
You can consider yourself extremely lucky. Otherwise with this blacklisting thing, buying off random people has become very risky unless you’re lucky or do your due diligence.
From what i have read here seems like no matter what you do you can still get funked. License? Check. Contract? Check. Meet at a police station? Check. Apparently if they block it you still cant get it unblocked unless the seller does it. Cops won't do shit unless he was doing 67 in a 50.
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We Shall Never Forget 7/08 '14
We Shall Never Forget 8/19 '11

Toilet Paper Calculations Thread
Newbie
Sep 3, 2017
43 posts
6 upvotes
If you're buying devices that's at least a year old, no one would report it stolen because they've got nothing to gain. (Insurance scam only applies for 1st yr after purchase anyways)

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