Cell Phones

Buying phones on Kijiji - Blacklisted

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 13th, 2018 9:20 pm
Member
Feb 27, 2014
289 posts
48 upvotes
Phonophoresis wrote:
Sep 29th, 2017 1:36 am
Usually for items where a purchase is made under someone's name (i.e. sports/concert tickets, phones), people are usually amenable to showing an ID if requested (in my experience).
That's true. There is a need to show proof of ownership if the name of purchaser/owner is shown on the merchandise (tickets).
Member
Feb 27, 2014
289 posts
48 upvotes
Viper98 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2017 11:39 am
I've been buying/selling phones on Kijiji for the better part of a decade a d have never had someone blacklist a phone on me(literally several hundred phones)
Good point. Only those sales that turned bad (blacklisted) got posted here. People don't post Kijiji's cell phone sales that has no problems. So the actual percentage of blacklisted phones sold on Kijiji is not known. It could be 1 out of 100 cell phones sold on Kijiji. Or 1 out of 1000 cell phones sold on Kijiji.
Member
User avatar
Jun 18, 2017
216 posts
70 upvotes
Vancouver
Wow when I got my last phone on craigslist I thought it was weird that the guy gave me his receipt with full personal information on it, but I guess he was trying to be reassuring.
That's my name...
Newbie
Jan 8, 2017
40 posts
10 upvotes
I'd make sure the conversation got flipped to real e-mail before making the purchase. Also a good idea to exchange texts. (yes, they could use a burner, but that coupled with an e-mail?).

Having a phone blacklisted after selling it is fraud (it's the equivalent to stealing). The police can subpoena the cell records from the carrier and the e-mail records from the mail poster and the associated ISP when they view the mail headers.

People knowingly selling stolen phones actually can't do that as they don't have that relationship with the originating carrier.

As for what to do with blacklisted devices that you DID purchase from the rightful owner? Once the police have been involved they should be able to get the carrier to have the blacklist cleared. (It's a database maintained by the GSMA - the originating carriers can clear the entry if it's justified - ie. the phone was blacklisted erroneously).
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2007
566 posts
289 upvotes
The way you can avoid this scam is to get a signed bill of sale when you buy a phone off of Kijiji. And if you're really paranoid ask them to confirm their identity with photo ID as well. If the seller is legit, they'll be willing to give you a bill of sale. Although I probably wouldn't be buying a phone for hundreds of dollars on Kijiji, if new phones are on there they're quite often stolen.
Banned
Oct 9, 2017
35 posts
4 upvotes
Then brother in law is lucky, he bought 2 iphones from kijiji, and he didn't get black listed
Deal Addict
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May 11, 2009
4147 posts
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Debtario
Just like with watches, buy the seller, not the phone! Dealing with reputable sellers is key.
OpenMobile wrote:
Oct 14th, 2017 8:28 pm
...
Having a phone blacklisted after selling it is fraud (it's the equivalent to stealing). The police can subpoena the cell records from the carrier and the e-mail records from the mail poster and the associated ISP when they view the mail headers.
...
That is incorrect, fraud would be the seller taking the money and walking without giving you a phone. You get a phone, but it is not what you expected since it's blacklisted, it becomes a civil matter between you and the seller. The police won't help unless there is outright theft, even then there has to be violence/weapons/threats involved for it to be taken seriously enough to involve subpoenas from service providers.
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Newbie
Jan 8, 2017
40 posts
10 upvotes
Nope, you're wrong. Blacklisting it after the effect is equivalent to declaring it stolen after selling it. It's still fraud, regardless of whether your malice was before or after the sale.

Whether the police are willing to investigate or not really depends on your locale. I wouldn't expect them to get involved in Toronto...but smaller municipalities, you may be able to find a sympathetic ear.

If you can find the identity of the thief, you can take them to small claims court to recoup your money. (hence the need to try to get real contact information).

Additionally...I'm thinking this happens very rare indeed...what would be the point in having something blacklisted after the fact - except to run the risk of getting yourself into trouble??? Pointless and immature.
Deal Fanatic
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May 17, 2006
5645 posts
1307 upvotes
GTA
One thing i am not clear about and perhaps someone has had some experience with is phones that are bought outright. Whether it is iphone or android, how does one go about blacklisting those as they are not part of any carrier inventory. From what i gather that phones bought outright from Apple cannot be blacklisted if they have never been activated? I assume at the point if insurance was involved and serial number was provided the insurance can get it blacklisted but no other recourse.
Deal Addict
Oct 25, 2005
1192 posts
553 upvotes
OpenMobile wrote:
Oct 14th, 2017 8:28 pm
Having a phone blacklisted after selling it is fraud (it's the equivalent to stealing). The police can subpoena the cell records from the carrier and the e-mail records from the mail poster and the associated ISP when they view the mail headers.

As for what to do with blacklisted devices that you DID purchase from the rightful owner? Once the police have been involved they should be able to get the carrier to have the blacklist cleared.
Are you joking?

Police would NEVER bother to subpoena cell records for this (they will not even get involved, will tell you to take it up in Civil Court)
Fraud would never be charged, much less proven

And even if you had their info, you would now be out another $500 or so dollars just to file the claim and try to enforce it
Only person who can unblacklist the phone is the person who reported it. Police again have nothing to with this.

Cut your losses and move on, not worth it
OpenMobile wrote:
Oct 24th, 2017 2:24 pm
Nope, you're wrong. Blacklisting it after the effect is equivalent to declaring it stolen after selling it. It's still fraud, regardless of whether your malice was before or after the sale.

Whether the police are willing to investigate or not really depends on your locale. I wouldn't expect them to get involved in Toronto...but smaller municipalities, you may be able to find a sympathetic ear.
Although I do not doubt in a small town an officer would be far more likely to talk to someone, unless that person is an idiot they do not need to answer anything.
Officer has nothing to charge them with.

Your legal definition is way off base as well. Fraud itself is not defined in Criminal Code, but the "malice" you refer to MUST be before the sale.
Once sale is completed, if he suddenly wakes up next morning deciding to screw you over (no idea why but for theory) this is in no way fraud
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Deal Addict
Jan 6, 2004
3859 posts
377 upvotes
Scarborough
Happened to me. Bought an iPhone 7+. Two months later, the phone lost reception. Checked the imei database and it was blacklisted. Kept the texts and contacted the seller. He said he did declare it lost for the Fido insurance money. He was puzzled why the carrier was able to block... very stupid person. He gave back the money without any hassle, cuz he wanted to “f the system”, not random people.
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Member
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Oct 24, 2016
461 posts
311 upvotes
ON
You can consider yourself extremely lucky. Otherwise with this blacklisting thing, buying off random people has become very risky unless you’re lucky or do your due diligence.
Isn't it great to live in the 21st century where deleting history has become more important than making it.
Deal Fanatic
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May 17, 2006
5645 posts
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Holystone wrote:
Oct 30th, 2017 10:29 am
You can consider yourself extremely lucky. Otherwise with this blacklisting thing, buying off random people has become very risky unless you’re lucky or do your due diligence.
From what i have read here seems like no matter what you do you can still get funked. License? Check. Contract? Check. Meet at a police station? Check. Apparently if they block it you still cant get it unblocked unless the seller does it. Cops won't do shit unless he was doing 67 in a 50.
Jr. Member
Sep 3, 2017
167 posts
81 upvotes
If you're buying devices that's at least a year old, no one would report it stolen because they've got nothing to gain. (Insurance scam only applies for 1st yr after purchase anyways)
Newbie
Nov 25, 2017
10 posts
2 upvotes
Buying a device that was sold unlocked from the OEM rather than a telco is also a good way to avoid being blacklisted. Only telcos blacklist not Manufacturers.

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