Automotive

buying tires from usa costco - getting them balanced/rotated in canada

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  • Jan 19th, 2012 1:46 pm
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May 21, 2006
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buying tires from usa costco - getting them balanced/rotated in canada

hi guys,

I will be making a trip in October to Ohio for a wedding.

My car's (2000 Honda Civic DX) tires (Michelin X Radial P185/65R14 85T) are at the end of their usable life.

The regular price at Costco in Canada is $114.99 + $14 install + 13% tax (total will be 583.03 for all 4).
The regular price at Costco in USA is $98.99 + $14.99 + 7% tax (total will be 483.59 USD for all 4 - which his about 459.41CAD).

So a savings of about $123 CAD.

I'm not counting the gas to drive there as I have to go down there no matter what.

Now here are my questions:

1) will my canadian costco membership card work at coscto in USA?
2) will the canadian costco do the regular tire rotation/balancing for tires purchased at a costco usa?
3) does usa costco have the $70 coupon that we regularly see in the canadian costco?

thanks
klad007
-klad007-
8 replies
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Jul 30, 2005
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klad007 wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2011 2:43 pm
1) will my canadian costco membership card work at coscto in USA? - YES
2) will the canadian costco do the regular tire rotation/balancing for tires purchased at a costco usa? - YES
3) does usa costco have the $70 coupon that we regularly see in the canadian costco? - YES

thanks
klad007
Answers above!!! Go for it!!
[OP]
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May 21, 2006
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thanks guys

now i will have to research when the usa costco has their tire coupons, lol
-klad007-
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Dec 3, 2007
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GT-eh
klad007 wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2011 3:50 pm
thanks guys

now i will have to research when the usa costco has their tire coupons, lol

I can confirm the Costco Canada membership (AMEX) works with Costco USA.
Member
Jan 29, 2010
399 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto
The question about buying tires in the US came up in another thread recently. There have been some articles run over the past few months about Canadian Customs and Immigration specifically watching out for cars licensed in Canada coming back across the border with tires that look brand new. Apparently this has become a new revenue stream for Canada as they're nailing people with fines, taxes and duties for not declaring the tires when coming back in (it didn't specify in the articles, but my guess is they nail you and then you have the ability to prove you bought them in Canada by submitting receipts, sort of a guilty-until-proven-innocent schtick). So although you may initially save around $100 doing it, keep in mind the potential consequences of buying them in the US and then getting caught not declaring them when you come back. First, if you're gone less than a week you're likely going to be over your personal exemption and may get dinged there (no, a passenger in the car can't claim two of the tires belong to them, the article covered that). Second, if the tires weren't manufactured in the US, Canada or Mexico you're going to get dinged for duty. Third, if you don't declare them and they catch you you're going to get dinged with a fine, too. It's possible your approx. $100 in savings ends up evaporating if you get caught without declaring them. If you declare them keep in mind there's a chance you'll have to pay duty (on non-NAFTA tires) and HST on anything above your personal exemption so you may want to factor that into your savings calculation. Are they going to stop and check your tires for sure? Nope. Even if they do will they just waive you through anyway? Maybe. Do you want to get caught not declaring them? No. I've seen what happens to people at the border when they get zapped for not declaring stuff and it's not pretty.
http://www.kingofham.com
For the love of barbecue...
[OP]
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May 21, 2006
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you bring up some good points. but I will be gone for atleast 3 days (leaving Thur night and coming back on Mon night) so that means i will fall into the 48 hour category so I will get $400 per person. Its me and my wife so in total we will have $800. I intend to declare the tires as they will cost me approx $460 CAD, so they can charge me duty on $60 if they want.

second question is what if these tires are not made in north america, can they still be covered under the $400 exemption or no?
Boods wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2011 10:48 pm
The question about buying tires in the US came up in another thread recently. There have been some articles run over the past few months about Canadian Customs and Immigration specifically watching out for cars licensed in Canada coming back across the border with tires that look brand new. Apparently this has become a new revenue stream for Canada as they're nailing people with fines, taxes and duties for not declaring the tires when coming back in (it didn't specify in the articles, but my guess is they nail you and then you have the ability to prove you bought them in Canada by submitting receipts, sort of a guilty-until-proven-innocent schtick). So although you may initially save around $100 doing it, keep in mind the potential consequences of buying them in the US and then getting caught not declaring them when you come back. First, if you're gone less than a week you're likely going to be over your personal exemption and may get dinged there (no, a passenger in the car can't claim two of the tires belong to them, the article covered that). Second, if the tires weren't manufactured in the US, Canada or Mexico you're going to get dinged for duty. Third, if you don't declare them and they catch you you're going to get dinged with a fine, too. It's possible your approx. $100 in savings ends up evaporating if you get caught without declaring them. If you declare them keep in mind there's a chance you'll have to pay duty (on non-NAFTA tires) and HST on anything above your personal exemption so you may want to factor that into your savings calculation. Are they going to stop and check your tires for sure? Nope. Even if they do will they just waive you through anyway? Maybe. Do you want to get caught not declaring them? No. I've seen what happens to people at the border when they get zapped for not declaring stuff and it's not pretty.
-klad007-
Member
Jan 29, 2010
399 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto
klad007 wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2011 4:24 pm
you bring up some good points. but I will be gone for atleast 3 days (leaving Thur night and coming back on Mon night) so that means i will fall into the 48 hour category so I will get $400 per person. Its me and my wife so in total we will have $800. I intend to declare the tires as they will cost me approx $460 CAD, so they can charge me duty on $60 if they want.

second question is what if these tires are not made in north america, can they still be covered under the $400 exemption or no?

Yes, the only difference is that being manufactured in one of the NAFTA countries means they're duty-free, i.e. you'd potentially still have to pay the tax on anything over your personal exemptions but tires not covered under NAFTA could also incur a duty charge. You'd also likely be able to get away with claiming two tires yourself and having your wife claim the other two since the car is owned by both of you. The article I read said don't try and get your buddies in the car to claim tires on your car under their own personal exemptions, Customs Officers aren't generally dumb enough to believe your buddy owns the tires you're driving around on. I think it's highly likely if you declare the tires and have the receipt handy for the officer to inspect if they choose to do so they'll just wave you through, I've lost count at this point how many times I've come back way over my personal limit, offered up the receipts of my own accord and then been waived through after they've given them a cursory check for alcohol and tobacco line items.
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Jan 31, 2007
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Aurora
Are there any RFD threads regarding buying new cars in the US and bringing them over to Canada? I was reading that Costco members in the US get invoice + $200 rates on Kia's (almost like an employee discount) and Kia is already priced extremely well in the US vs Canadian prices. Even with taxes it looks like it would be worth it and I believe the warranty would double from 5 years to 10 years, although one would have to return to the US to take advantage of that coverage. Would the state tax be refundable, or would Canadians need to look for a specific state to reduce taxes? Or is it wishful thinking since Canada probably has more than HST in place to disuade residents from buying abroad?
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