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Calling all cat owners...Advice

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[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2014
98 posts
54 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON

Calling all cat owners...Advice

Calling all cat owners....


So basically want to get a family pet. I believe a cat would be a good pet for us. As it is not as demanding as a dog can usually be. So looking to get a ragdoll kitten who will be about 10 weeks if we decide to get him. My only concern is we moved into a new house. The entire house is hardwood floors, no carpet or tile besides carpet in family room and tiles in the bathroom. Should I be concerned about my hardwood getting ruined. The other concern is I have a 2 year old daughter as well. Her being scratched is my number on concern.

I've been told to keep the nails trimmed and put up some scratching posts. However i would love to hear first hand what people's experiences are with this. Also will never think about declawing so that isn't even an option.

Thanks
17 replies
Newbie
Dec 2, 2014
36 posts
30 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I only have hardwood floors and no carpet in the house. I don't have any problem with my cat. The cat don't extend the nails when walking. He scratches the sofa from time to time but never on the floors (I do have scratching post at home).
I don't have kid but my cat do give us scratch mark and love bite. So I think you need to teach your cat not to scratch your daughter. I am still learning but having a cat at home is amazing.
Deal Addict
Aug 17, 2008
3775 posts
730 upvotes
Sask.
We've had kittens/cats for decades and just never had a problem with any of them scratching floors or furniture. Or hurting children.

It's a matter of training right from the beginning - we always have used a stern "NO!" if we see a kitten even starting to do something bad - yes, and sometimes you might have to do a swat (gentle, very gentle - if you can get within reach - it's more to scare them away). The trick is to do it every single time - no letting up. It's hard at first because you have to keep getting up - but it's worth it in the end, because it really doesn't take long for them to learn what they can and cannot do. Of course a kitten will keep exploring and trying.
You must have a scratching post - we have always had a three-tiered one which my husband made, covered in old carpet.

We have always kept kittens and cats nails trimmed - I use a baby nail clipper and just take off the tips, so there's never any danger of getting down to the quick. Others use specialty cat nail clippers, so hopefully someone here can give you info on those.

About Ragdolls - are you getting a purebred? They are pretty special, and you must research the breed. They cannot be allowed to go outdoors at all.
We have a Ragdoll cross, and she's got a lot of Ragdoll characteristics - she's floppy, the uber-sweet temperament, the bunny fur, the fur markings, blue eyes, big size but delicate - but she's also got some tabby characteristics which we love - she's got the broad regular face of a tabby instead of the pointy Siamese face.

This all said, we didn't get cats again until our son was five - in my opinion, two is too young. Our cats don't scratch nor bite, but that could be different with a toddler driving them nuts, maybe.
Member
Nov 17, 2014
378 posts
134 upvotes
Peterborough, ON
^ I think it depends on the Ragdoll. We let our little guy out in the backyard and he spends the whole time hunting and catching birds. I also think he would defend himself if he had to, not that I anticipate this happening. He is in general pretty bonkers and requires a lot of attention and playtime (talking like an hour twice a day). Like most Ragdolls he is very social and follows us around absolutely everywhere.


Image

Oh and to answer the question about the hardwood. I've noticed a few minor scratch marks on the floor I believe are from the cat but not too sure. I wouldn't be too worried about it. Hardwood will get scratched in one way or another cat or no cat.
Deal Addict
Aug 17, 2008
3775 posts
730 upvotes
Sask.
Oh, Copper, your kitty is absolutely gorgeous!

About the not going outside - it wasn't about defence, we were told that most Ragdolls if they saw a car coming, would just lie down and roll over, not run. Mind you, we have a cat bylaw in our city, so we can't let cats out anyway.
Newbie
Sep 8, 2013
86 posts
21 upvotes
Winnipeg
We've got hardwood floors upstairs and 3 cats. They've never scratched up the hardwoods floors or even the carpets downstairs or bedrooms. We don't have children but when my cousin along with his wife and 4yo girl lived with us for a few months, the cats never laid a paw on the child. In fact, the cats would often run away from the little girl as she was always trying to chase them around the house.
Member
Aug 13, 2006
266 posts
20 upvotes
Another data point from someone with hardwood flooring. The flooring is 6 years old and regularly abused by 3 cats pouncing and running across it. There are scratches but nothing out of the ordinary of typical wear and tear and requires looking very closely to actually notice. With regular claw clippings you should be ok.

Regarding scratching, it depends on the cat and your daughter's personality.

Cats extend their claw when they feel defensive. The exception to it is when the cat kneads. If the claws are not regularly clipped, it can feel like acupuncture (but I was never scratched or bled from it). Teaching your daughter to be gentle with the cat is key.

Look for a kitten that is laid back instead of skittish. If they get scared easily, there is higher chance of them going into defensive mode. Having a cat-only area (e.g: elevated spot on the cat tree) that your daughter cannot get to will provide a safe place for it to retreat to if necessary.

Sounds like your heart is set on this (to be) 10 weeks old kitten. If possible, consider an older cat. Their personality has developed and they are more mellow than kittens.

Good luck!
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Jun 15, 2012
9670 posts
3985 upvotes
Southern Ontario
gtadoors wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2016 7:04 pm
Calling all cat owners....


So basically want to get a family pet. I believe a cat would be a good pet for us. As it is not as demanding as a dog can usually be. So looking to get a ragdoll kitten who will be about 10 weeks if we decide to get him. My only concern is we moved into a new house. The entire house is hardwood floors, no carpet or tile besides carpet in family room and tiles in the bathroom. Should I be concerned about my hardwood getting ruined. The other concern is I have a 2 year old daughter as well. Her being scratched is my number on concern.

I've been told to keep the nails trimmed and put up some scratching posts. However i would love to hear first hand what people's experiences are with this. Also will never think about declawing so that isn't even an option.

Thanks
Did you end up getting one? We have a young Ragdoll, she lets you pick her up however you want and flops in our arms. You'd wonder if she had claws at all because she doesn't even use them when cats do that kickoff as you put them down. We have a scratching post and taught her to use it, entice it with catnip. That was to avoid her randomly scratching furniture. I trim her nails every few weeks, basically clipping the tips because if you go too far, they'll bleed. Even if I didn't trim them, it would have no effect on our hardwood. I don't know if most Ragdolls have the same temperament, but ours never scratches or bites our kids and my younger daughter picks her up in the most awkward ways.
Ragdolls from what I understand act like dogs, she follows us around and plays fetch with cat toys. Having said all this, I'm not really a big cat person, my wife did the research. As mentioned above, she chose the least skiddish kitten.

Before her we had a Husky and Bengal Tabby, both big shedders (both passed, naturally life expectancy). Dogs are much more work, you have to take them out to go to the bathroom, and I had to jog with my husky daily (most breeds require walking regardless). Interestingly as fluffy as our Ragdoll, we hardly notice fur anywhere and we have dark hardwood.

Xmas 2015 as a kitten:

Image
Deal Addict
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Jul 19, 2012
1638 posts
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Canada
hard wood floors are ok for cats, it's not a dog or horse for chrissake!!

teach your toddler to be gentle with the cat
Deal Addict
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Sep 6, 2006
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super cute ancaster!

I have hard wood floors and multiple cats, the only they scratch is if something truly scares them (something shatters) and they all run away as fast as possible.
That's once in a blue moon so it's not an issue.
Just maintain their nails and don't do anything crazy.
Penalty Box
Mar 8, 2016
325 posts
48 upvotes
op if u are more concerned about ur floors than the cat i think you are a person who should not own a cat, nor any other large animal. its better if you get a caged animal perhaps a fish or something like that.
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Apr 30, 2005
1341 posts
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Toronto
first I applaud op's decision not to declaw the cat, which is cruel and against law in some states of US, not sure here in canada. some greedy vets (in GTA) still practice it. I have 3 cats but no kids, so I can't say about scratching your baby. but they have never scratched the floor. however, they scratched my bed, my sofa (the corner)...even there are scratch posts. well, so be it. if you ever decide to get one, i suggest adopt one from humane society, not spend hundreds or even thousand to buy from some private pet owners. (two of my cats were adopted from humane society when they were 4 years old). yes, please do consider the old ones. most people like to adopt as young as possible. but old ones need home more urgently - they are ahead in the line of being put down if no one adopts them.
Penalty Box
Mar 8, 2016
325 posts
48 upvotes
forgetpwd wrote:
Jun 26th, 2016 7:54 pm
first I applaud op's decision not to declaw the cat, which is cruel and against law in some states of US, not sure here in canada. some greedy vets (in GTA) still practice it. I have 3 cats but no kids, so I can't say about scratching your baby. but they have never scratched the floor. however, they scratched my bed, my sofa (the corner)...even there are scratch posts. well, so be it. if you ever decide to get one, i suggest adopt one from humane society, not spend hundreds or even thousand to buy from some private pet owners. (two of my cats were adopted from humane society when they were 4 years old). yes, please do consider the old ones. most people like to adopt as young as possible. but old ones need home more urgently - they are ahead in the line of being put down if no one adopts them.
yes but the op in my opinion should not be anywhere near a cat. she is more worried about her floors than her cat, in my opinion she should get a fish or something
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
We have hardwood floors.

The secret is they are 50 years old and have stains of life on them. They aren't living breathing entities and we don't care as much about material things vs bringing an animal into our lives that needs a home.

We also don't have super expensive furniture except in the living room, but the cats go in there too. We cover funiture with blankets and have a 7 foot tall cat tree in the main room the cats spend time in but it doesn't stop some wear and tear, especially on the stairs which are carpet.

Don't get a cat if you can't accept scratching. When they are declawed they are more likely to bite in defence (MUCH more dangerous and can lead to blood poisoning) and urinate outside the litter box.

Do not get a purebred. They are expensive when you can essentially get a cat off the street or from a shelter that needs a home and has a great personality. Two of mine are from off the street AND were initally feral and they are FANTASTIC. I know someone that went out and spent a ton on Ragdolls... they are totally regular cats. Also more prone to certain problems such as cancer and heart conditions.

Go to a shelter and save a life and find the right match... I would never purchase a cat when there are upwards of 100 million on the streets starving and fighting for their lives in the world. So many cats enter shelters every year and a great deal (upwards of 70%) never make it out. Of those about 80% are healthly.

Cats for the most part aren't like dogs were certain breeds may have vast personality differences, every cat is unique. Most cat breeds were created less than 100 years ago from the very cats found off the street or are bred down from combining other breeds -- and aren't as healthy as a regular cat.

Our one cat that was a purebred Snowshoe (I had no hand it getting this cat) is the most anti-social nasty cat ever and we got her as a kitten. She also has had thousands of dollars in vet bills due to pancreatitis and IBD, and her food costs a fortune to keep her healthy. She has been unhealthy since she was young. Keep in mind kittens are usually all cute and cuddly but their true personlities do not emerge until they get older - another reason to adopt an older cat which has a set personality already.

Meanwhile, by contrast one of our feral cats acts more like a dog. He is very active and playful and affectionate and vocal and gentle and easygoing. He wrestles with the dogs, has serious seperation anxiety, plays fetch and loves us hiding his toys all over the cat tree, where he will search out and find them stuck various places and make Matrix moves to paw them out. Then he'll want you to hide them again right away... Or if we're out he'll often drop them in our shoes at the door. All this from an initially extremely vicious, food obsessed, unneutered male cat that was wounded in a fight with wildlife and starving, likely eating poisoned rats in our neighbourhood and looking very sickly before we accidentally trapped him in our house. He has a more engaging personality than almost any cat I've known (and I've known a lot, I volunteered at the largest cat sanctuary in North America).

Please keep these things in mind when shopping for a life...

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