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Calling All UTSC Economics Grads

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  • Nov 20th, 2017 10:37 am
[OP]
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Apr 10, 2017
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East York, ON

Calling All UTSC Economics Grads

I have some general questions about the Economics for management studies program. I'm in the first year of the program right now and besides MATA32/33, I dont seem to find the econ courses difficult to do well in...kinda on the easy side. But do econ classes get easier after the first year like MGEB02/06/12 or the C level courses?
My friend who graduated from this program says that first and second year are hard but third and forth year become easier, is this information accurate?

Others have also said the jump from A level to B level is pretty dramatic while B and C lvl are more closely related.

Thanks a bunch in advance!
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That is correct, everyone is different tho. The first year is really to weed the weak out.... too many students in the program typically

Some might find the 3rd and 4th courses to be easier than others - some may struggle. Depends on your strengths and whether or not you are studying and grasping the concepts. Economics is pretty easy in my opinion but would you feel the same way? Who knows?
[OP]
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Apr 10, 2017
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East York, ON
imflying12 wrote:
Oct 24th, 2017 6:48 pm
That is correct, everyone is different tho. The first year is really to weed the weak out.... too many students in the program typically

Some might find the 3rd and 4th courses to be easier than others - some may struggle. Depends on your strengths and whether or not you are studying and grasping the concepts. Economics is pretty easy in my opinion but would you feel the same way? Who knows?
My friend who graduated wasn't the best in economics, he only continued it because he had taken half the courses already and delay in graduation. Surprising that he found the upper-level courses easier. His marks in first and second-year economics were in the 60s, he was shocked at the grades I was getting and that I didn't find it difficult although we both put the same effort in terms of studying. Which profs did you find easier? Mazaheri teaches most of the upper levels, I'm not sure if he's good (easy) or a hard marker. I have to maintain a certain gpa for co-op so I'm trying to be extra careful.

I presume you graduated with an econ major. Was it a useful degree when finding your first job or do employers look down upon it?
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Oct 19, 2017
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zipperz wrote:
Oct 25th, 2017 3:44 pm
My friend who graduated wasn't the best in economics, he only continued it because he had taken half the courses already and delay in graduation. Surprising that he found the upper-level courses easier. His marks in first and second-year economics were in the 60s, he was shocked at the grades I was getting and that I didn't find it difficult although we both put the same effort in terms of studying. Which profs did you find easier? Mazaheri teaches most of the upper levels, I'm not sure if he's good (easy) or a hard marker. I have to maintain a certain gpa for co-op so I'm trying to be extra careful.

I presume you graduated with an econ major. Was it a useful degree when finding your first job or do employers look down upon it?
I did my undergrad at UTM and I completely agree with the notion that for some reason, the lower year courses seem harder than the upper year courses if we're talking about economics (the only exception being econometrics, which was easily the hardest economics course you could take in undergrad). My guess is that it has to do with the lower year courses being exceptionally focused on the mathematical theory, which can really turn some people off. The upper year course on the other hand, blends a combination of mathematical theory and applied economic contexts, which is easier to digest.
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The later courses are generally more 'easy' going in that it specializes on a particular segment (therefore more exploratory, take your time to dig deeper) and is not so focused on every economic theory that can be overwhelming.
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Sep 27, 2010
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Does anybody still have their notes and tests? Ideally for all economics courses. I am interested in buying them.
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I graduated from the BBA program so its very econ heavy. I struggled the first year as well as I have no prior econ background at all. Naturally I hated every moment of it and begrudgingly took all the prerequisite courses. The best course is money and banking taught by Walid Hejazi. Having said that, I thought never again will I use all these "useless" econ courses but as I get deeper and deeper into global macro investment and trading after graduation, all the prior knowledge slowly surfaced and made my life much easier at understanding some of the macro dynamics.

Even though the courses are at an undergrad level, I find them sufficient as an "applied" knowledge to aid my investment thesis, and to better understand all the various economics reports and analysis written by the fed and research analysts.
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Nov 18, 2017
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traderjay wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 11:05 pm
I graduated from the BBA program so its very econ heavy. I struggled the first year as well as I have no prior econ background at all. Naturally I hated every moment of it and begrudgingly took all the prerequisite courses. The best course is money and banking taught by Walid Hejazi. Having said that, I thought never again will I use all these "useless" econ courses but as I get deeper and deeper into global macro investment and trading after graduation, all the prior knowledge slowly surfaced and made my life much easier at understanding some of the macro dynamics.

Even though the courses are at an undergrad level, I find them sufficient as an "applied" knowledge to aid my investment thesis, and to better understand all the various economics reports and analysis written by the fed and research analysts.
What other courses would you recommend (specifically C- and D- levels)? Also, what made Money and Banking a great course? Was it the professor? Course content? Was it applicable to real life?
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tsilva33 wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 8:03 pm
What other courses would you recommend (specifically C- and D- levels)? Also, what made Money and Banking a great course? Was it the professor? Course content? Was it applicable to real life?
My memory is fuzzy now since I graduated in 2008, right when the world is going down the tubes. The prof for Money & Banking is great and the content gives you a good understanding how how central banks operate (at least theoretically). I will say the A level economics course are also very helpful at giving you the working knowledge on how the economy operates once you start looking at real world events.

The other stuff learned such as M1, M2 and velocity of money also becomes extremely helpful for macro analysis.
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