Art and Photography

Can Anyone Breakdown Film Developing in the GTA?

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 14th, 2017 4:05 pm
Deal Addict
Feb 3, 2006
1055 posts
29 upvotes
I was about to start a new thread but decided to post here.

I have a canon 35mm camera that I bought years ago in Japan.
I don't have a DSLR camera and was looking to into photography.

Just curious but why do some of you still shoot using 35mm film.

Apart from the hassles of getting the film developed, are there any advantages?
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3638 posts
386 upvotes
Toronto
For 35mm it's more of a process thing (the act of using older manual film cameras, adjusting settings, etc.) For larger formats there can also be some quality / tonal rendition aspects that people like.
Deal Addict
Feb 21, 2013
3464 posts
771 upvotes
Toronto
fogo wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 9:07 pm
I was about to start a new thread but decided to post here.

I have a canon 35mm camera that I bought years ago in Japan.
I don't have a DSLR camera and was looking to into photography.

Just curious but why do some of you still shoot using 35mm film.

Apart from the hassles of getting the film developed, are there any advantages?
I got into shooting 35mm film recently as a way to challenge myself more. I was finding that I'd get lazy when shooting digital, and knowing that I have a finite number of exposures, and knowing that I needed to get it right for one shot was a way to get me more engaged. Shooting film helped me consider composition better, and make sure that the shot I wanted to take really was worth it, and not just a throwaway thing.

I do think it's helped with picking and choosing when to take a photo, and to be more discriminate about what I shoot.
Games: XBox Live: M1GO

Gear: Fujifilm X-Pro2 | Canon A-1
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 19, 2006
3407 posts
185 upvotes
Toronto
fogo wrote:
Dec 10th, 2017 9:07 pm
I was about to start a new thread but decided to post here.

I have a canon 35mm camera that I bought years ago in Japan.
I don't have a DSLR camera and was looking to into photography.

Just curious but why do some of you still shoot using 35mm film.

Apart from the hassles of getting the film developed, are there any advantages?
The biggest reason for me shooting film is that it's photography for myself. When you shoot digital, alot of people put pressure on you to immediately show your work, or they ask you to take photos for/of them. With film, I just tell them I can my work in a month when I develop it or that I'm not wasting money to shoot their portrait photo unless they pay for the film and developing.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3638 posts
386 upvotes
Toronto
M1GOmigs wrote:
Dec 13th, 2017 3:00 pm
I do think it's helped with picking and choosing when to take a photo, and to be more discriminate about what I shoot.
In that case, you should switch over to an old Medium Format camera (10-12 shots per roll) or, even better, a field camera that uses individual sheet film!
Deal Addict
Feb 21, 2013
3464 posts
771 upvotes
Toronto
JHW wrote:
Dec 13th, 2017 8:59 pm
In that case, you should switch over to an old Medium Format camera (10-12 shots per roll) or, even better, a field camera that uses individual sheet film!
While I have friends who sometimes shoot Medium Format and have even dabbled in tin type, I know 35mm strikes the best balance of affordability while still being fun. Once I'm shooting larger format at more cost per shot, I don't know if I'd feel right after missing shots.
Games: XBox Live: M1GO

Gear: Fujifilm X-Pro2 | Canon A-1
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3638 posts
386 upvotes
Toronto
M1GOmigs wrote:
Dec 13th, 2017 10:11 pm
While I have friends who sometimes shoot Medium Format and have even dabbled in tin type, I know 35mm strikes the best balance of affordability while still being fun. Once I'm shooting larger format at more cost per shot, I don't know if I'd feel right after missing shots.
For sure. I was kinda joking, but in all seriousness, I've come to prefer the even more deliberate practice of medium-format photography and actually sold my 35mm film camera some time ago. I was at a point where 35mm didn't feel "different enough" from digital to be worthwhile.
Deal Addict
Feb 21, 2013
3464 posts
771 upvotes
Toronto
JHW wrote:
Dec 13th, 2017 10:49 pm
For sure. I was kinda joking, but in all seriousness, I've come to prefer the even more deliberate practice of medium-format photography and actually sold my 35mm film camera some time ago. I was at a point where 35mm didn't feel "different enough" from digital to be worthwhile.
Yeah don't get me wrong, whenever I see a Rolleiflex for sale, I get real curious... And I was close to considering one of those cheap plastic Holga medium format cameras just to give it a shot, but I feel like I can wait a bit. We'll see.
Games: XBox Live: M1GO

Gear: Fujifilm X-Pro2 | Canon A-1
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3638 posts
386 upvotes
Toronto
M1GOmigs wrote:
Dec 14th, 2017 12:38 am
Yeah don't get me wrong, whenever I see a Rolleiflex for sale, I get real curious... And I was close to considering one of those cheap plastic Holga medium format cameras just to give it a shot, but I feel like I can wait a bit. We'll see.
I actually have a Rolleiflex. They are incredible cameras and I've immensely enjoyed having mine (I had other TLRs before that). All of its features and quirks (ground glass composition and focusing, manual exposure and focus, fixed lens, limited close-focus etc.) really force you to slow way down and think carefully about every shot. The image quality is excellent as well. Developing at home and having a scanner that can handle 6x6cm negs really helps, of course.

The Yashicamats and Rolleicords are other, less expensive (and likely just as good) options. Holgas are a waste of money IMO unless you like the plastic-lens look.
Deal Addict
Feb 21, 2013
3464 posts
771 upvotes
Toronto
JHW wrote:
Dec 14th, 2017 9:24 am
I actually have a Rolleiflex. They are incredible cameras and I've immensely enjoyed having mine (I had other TLRs before that). All of its features and quirks (ground glass composition and focusing, manual exposure and focus, fixed lens, limited close-focus etc.) really force you to slow way down and think carefully about every shot. The image quality is excellent as well. Developing at home and having a scanner that can handle 6x6cm negs really helps, of course.

The Yashicamats and Rolleicords are other, less expensive (and likely just as good) options. Holgas are a waste of money IMO unless you like the plastic-lens look.
Yeah, I didn't bother with the Holga after doing a bit more research because it seemed like a waste of money. I don't really look hard enough, but I only ever see the more expensive Mamiya/Rolleiflex/Hasselblad cameras being sold, and not the knock off or lower end Rolleis. I do have a scanner that can handle larger film negatives, but I can't develop at home because I have a toddler, a newborn coming, and a dog... and due to space constraints, I just don't have a secure place to keep all the chemicals. My wife has actually developed film before using dark bags, but right now it's just not in the cards, and probably won't be for a while.
Games: XBox Live: M1GO

Gear: Fujifilm X-Pro2 | Canon A-1
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3638 posts
386 upvotes
Toronto
M1GOmigs wrote:
Dec 14th, 2017 9:44 am
Yeah, I didn't bother with the Holga after doing a bit more research because it seemed like a waste of money. I don't really look hard enough, but I only ever see the more expensive Mamiya/Rolleiflex/Hasselblad cameras being sold, and not the knock off or lower end Rolleis. I do have a scanner that can handle larger film negatives, but I can't develop at home because I have a toddler, a newborn coming, and a dog... and due to space constraints, I just don't have a secure place to keep all the chemicals. My wife has actually developed film before using dark bags, but right now it's just not in the cards, and probably won't be for a while.
If you ever get interested, you can try the camera fairs that happen around the GTA around 4-5 times per year (usually in Thornhill and Etobicoke). They are announced / advertised on the Photographic Historical Society of Canada newsletter (which you can sign up for through their website). That's where I got my Rolleiflex.

Hasselblads and Mamiyas are fantastic cameras but IMO more complex and less fun to use due to that complexity (and weight).

It can take surprisingly little space to do your own film (with a dark-bag and minimal equipment) but I think time constraints are actually going to be your main concern. I know when my kids were very little I did almost no photography (except for pictures of them).
Deal Addict
Feb 21, 2013
3464 posts
771 upvotes
Toronto
JHW wrote:
Dec 14th, 2017 11:10 am
If you ever get interested, you can try the camera fairs that happen around the GTA around 4-5 times per year (usually in Thornhill and Etobicoke). They are announced / advertised on the Photographic Historical Society of Canada newsletter (which you can sign up for through their website). That's where I got my Rolleiflex.

Hasselblads and Mamiyas are fantastic cameras but IMO more complex and less fun to use due to that complexity (and weight).

It can take surprisingly little space to do your own film (with a dark-bag and minimal equipment) but I think time constraints are actually going to be your main concern. I know when my kids were very little I did almost no photography (except for pictures of them).
Yeah the time constraints are definitely going to be a factor for sure. My daughter right now thankfully sleeps through the night pretty well, so I have time to scan photos sometimes, but getting the negatives developed gives me a bit more time, and for $6 to develop them, it's worth the time and mess I save.

I've actually been to a PHSC event in Etobicoke once, and I managed to score a decently priced prime lens for my Canon, as well as some lens caps. But if I do end up getting into MF, you're right, it'll likely be when my kids are a bit older.
Games: XBox Live: M1GO

Gear: Fujifilm X-Pro2 | Canon A-1
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 3, 2007
3007 posts
310 upvotes
I quit shooting all film about a year and a halfago. Prior to that I had an Xpan that I shot a nice Havana project with and a Rolleiflex that I used sparingly. I sold both. A few months back, I was going over the photos I shot with the Xpan and realized it was probably some of my best work. Long story short, the Xpan has increased so much in value that I couldn't re-purchase it so I settled with a Fuji G617. That produces 4 shots a roll on 120. lol.
Neil Ta, Epic Wedding Photographer. My Instagram

Top