Automotive

Can car still run with blown turbo?

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  • May 18th, 2009 10:47 pm
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[OP]
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Jan 22, 2007
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Can car still run with blown turbo?

I'm contemplating whether or whether not to buy a car with a blown turbo. I have the money for the car, but not the turbo as of yet. My question is, can a car with a blown turbo still drive? If so, how bad is it for the engine?

Thanks
Luckyinfil wrote:
May 18th, 2010 5:23 pm
No gym for home, work out floor with 30, but is it for 20 like 30 lb when you no lift it to be for men, for 30 lbs instead? or half is 10 for 20 pounds?

UMM HOW i word this... ok u take 20 lbs no lifting for 30lb if guy, so divide 2 u dont sit, u get 10 but for guy it no 30, so 20 would be for guy if u werent a girl ?
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Oct 25, 2003
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Depends on what blown turbo means. If ones the whole turbine etc, and run it without that, you'll have horrible lower issues due to the low compression

It'll be like driving a 3 cylinder Geo Metro, or Toyota Tercel or worse
it's me ramin.
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Define blown turbo. Wastegate stuck open? Wastegate stuck closed. Bearings gone. What car is it.
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If it's a modern car I think it should be fine as long as you drive it gently. Turbo cars don't run on boost most of the time anyway so it will be no different and the EFI should be able to manage.

If we're talking about a 1970s Porsche 911 Turbo or Maserati with the turbocharger blowing through the carburator then I probably wouldn't.
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KawaiiTentacleBeast statement on the available power without a turbo is absolutely correct. Many turbo assisted engines never get boosted more than a couple of times a year. The loss of turbo assist isn't the problem. It's the possible loss of some metallic fragments that are of far greater concern. It is conceivable that the engine has received major damage by sucking in these fragments. This sounds like a gamble.
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It's the possible loss of some metallic fragments that are of far greater concern. It is conceivable that the engine has received major damage by sucking in these fragments. This sounds like a gamble.
I don't think this is an issue. It isn't really common for the cold side of a turbo to fragment, since the cold side isn't exposed to the exhaust and is designed specifically to resist damage from foreign objects. Furthermore most modern turbo cars have intercoolers that would block any sort of debris from entering the engine. Again if you're talking about some 1970s non-intercooled Porsche or Maserati or CA18ET Nissan 200SX then maybe not. It would depend on what kind of damage the turbo has sustained though.

Anyway I was only commenting on whether you could drive it without the turbo. I think the OP understands that turbochargers don't usually just fail on their own without poor maintanence or modification/abuse, so he knows what he's getting into.
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KawaiiTentacleBeast wrote:
May 17th, 2009 1:31 pm
I don't think this is an issue. It isn't really common for the cold side of a turbo to fragment, since the cold side isn't exposed to the exhaust and is designed specifically to resist damage from foreign objects. Furthermore most modern turbo cars have intercoolers that would block any sort of debris from entering the engine. Again if you're talking about some 1970s non-intercooled Porsche or Maserati or CA18ET Nissan 200SX then maybe not. It would depend on what kind of damage the turbo has sustained though.

Anyway I was only commenting on whether you could drive it without the turbo. I think the OP understands that turbochargers don't usually just fail on their own without poor maintanence or modification/abuse, so he knows what he's getting into.
My only exposure to turbos is with Subaru. When the turbo goes it is fairly common to have to rebuild the engine.
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Yeah, I just did some more reading and I guess it's possible, depending on how the turbo is oriented, for bits of the turbine side to fall back into the exhaust manifold. But without knowing what kind of car it is it would be speculation at this point.

I hope it's a 1970s Porsche or Maserati Biturbo. :lol:
[OP]
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The car is a 1998 Audi A4 1.8T (well, no T for now, hah). It's fairly cheap (~$1500).

What im thinking of doing is scrapping a turbo from a junk yard (~$500).

Can a turbo be installed by myself or does it need to be done at a shop? From what i've been reading, the main part is the piping, and removing the components to access the turbo.

Do you think it's worth it? If I would need to rebuild the engine, then how much would that cost? Also, I thought turbo's die, every so often (maybe 10 years?)...so it wouldn't be because of abuse or modification..no?

So basically I can drive the car, it would just be severly underpowered right?
Luckyinfil wrote:
May 18th, 2010 5:23 pm
No gym for home, work out floor with 30, but is it for 20 like 30 lb when you no lift it to be for men, for 30 lbs instead? or half is 10 for 20 pounds?

UMM HOW i word this... ok u take 20 lbs no lifting for 30lb if guy, so divide 2 u dont sit, u get 10 but for guy it no 30, so 20 would be for guy if u werent a girl ?
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nornet wrote:
May 17th, 2009 1:18 pm
KawaiiTentacleBeast statement on the available power without a turbo is absolutely correct. Many turbo assisted engines never get boosted more than a couple of times a year. The loss of turbo assist isn't the problem. It's the possible loss of some metallic fragments that are of far greater concern. It is conceivable that the engine has received major damage by sucking in these fragments. This sounds like a gamble.
nornet: Define "Boost" please?

onecoolloser: A 1.8T from 1998 A4 is usually an AEB model engine which spools at 1750RPM.... Sooooo... Any driving UNDER 1750RPM will be similar to normal, and any driving OVER 1750RPM will be reduced performance.
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Circuit wrote:
May 17th, 2009 3:29 pm
nornet: Define "Boost" please?

onecoolloser: A 1.8T from 1998 A4 is usually an AEB model engine which spools at 1750RPM.... Sooooo... Any driving UNDER 1750RPM will be similar to normal, and any driving OVER 1750RPM will be reduced performance.
Sorry totally the wrong word, should have been engaged. The cold temps this weekend are affecting my brain.

edit. When I wrote this we didn't know the OP was looking at an Audi. That statement pertains to Volvos.
[OP]
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Do you guys think it's worth it to buy the car?
Luckyinfil wrote:
May 18th, 2010 5:23 pm
No gym for home, work out floor with 30, but is it for 20 like 30 lb when you no lift it to be for men, for 30 lbs instead? or half is 10 for 20 pounds?

UMM HOW i word this... ok u take 20 lbs no lifting for 30lb if guy, so divide 2 u dont sit, u get 10 but for guy it no 30, so 20 would be for guy if u werent a girl ?
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Aug 27, 2004
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onecoolloser wrote:
May 17th, 2009 6:28 pm
Do you guys think it's worth it to buy the car?
Are you a skilled mechanic, or do you have a good buddy or brother in law who is and who can help you fix the thing?
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nornet wrote:
May 17th, 2009 1:18 pm
KawaiiTentacleBeast statement on the available power without a turbo is absolutely correct. Many turbo assisted engines never get boosted more than a couple of times a year. The loss of turbo assist isn't the problem. It's the possible loss of some metallic fragments that are of far greater concern. It is conceivable that the engine has received major damage by sucking in these fragments. This sounds like a gamble.
Apparently you have never driven a boosted vehicle before? You are entering boost pretty much any time your foot is over halfway down on the throttle and at least 2000 rpms or greater and accelerating
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Sep 18, 2007
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I know nothing about turbo'd cars but I highly doubt it will pass an e-test with a blown turbo. You can buy the car as-is but to get it licensed you'll probably have to fix it.
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