Shopping Discussion

Can I bring vegetables/fruits from US to Canada?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 3rd, 2010 12:58 am
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Deal Addict
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Oct 22, 2009
2212 posts
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Lethbridge
The key to enjoying exotic fruit in Canada is as follows (please note, individual results will vary):

Step 1: Answer All Questions With “No.”
Step 2: Proceed Through Border Unabated
Step 3: Enjoy Kumquats
Newbie
Jul 22, 2010
4 posts
canada
I crossed the border with 3 bananas, and 1 apple at Niagara fall...they let me pass
Deal Guru
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Aug 20, 2005
10455 posts
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Pauly Boy wrote:
Jul 23rd, 2010 12:48 pm
The key to enjoying exotic fruit in Canada is as follows (please note, individual results will vary):

Step 1: Answer All Questions With “No.”
Step 2: Proceed Through Border Unabated
Step 3: Enjoy Kumquats
As a kid, I remember border agents going through my parents trailer looking for fruits and vegetables because my parents said we didn't have any. After having Florida oranges confiscated at the border, my parents knew to leave that stuff at home but they weren't believed.

These days, I leave all fruits and vegetables at home and avoid buying them in the US to bring home. It's just easier that way.
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Aug 22, 2003
15532 posts
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Niagara Falls
sdm242 wrote:
Jul 23rd, 2010 11:26 am
We're going to be camping for a few days in the US and I don't want to have to buy all my food there. What foods can I take across the border?

... finally found the answer for myself. If anyone else is interested:
http://consumerinformation.ca/app/oca/c ... nguage=eng
I take it you've never grocery shopped in the US? Groceries are far cheaper in the US. Buy all the groceries you'll need in the US and save yourself some money. ;)

BTW folks, it's pretty normal for folks to bring produce back into Canada. Occaisionally there are restrictions due to disease outbreaks but generally it's a non-issue. Taking produce into the US is another story. If it's a product of Canada it's generally ok, a product of another country is an absolute no-no due to disease and pest concerns. Can't say I blame the US either for wanting to protect their produce operations...
Thinking seriously about the 4 S's...Sun, Sand, Surf and ... Booked for Sept in Mexico and booked Samana DR for Jan!
Sr. Member
Apr 26, 2004
537 posts
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Cambridge
CSK'sMom wrote:
Jul 23rd, 2010 5:07 pm
I take it you've never grocery shopped in the US? Groceries are far cheaper in the US. Buy all the groceries you'll need in the US and save yourself some money. ;)

BTW folks, it's pretty normal for folks to bring produce back into Canada. Occaisionally there are restrictions due to disease outbreaks but generally it's a non-issue. Taking produce into the US is another story. If it's a product of Canada it's generally ok, a product of another country is an absolute no-no due to disease and pest concerns. Can't say I blame the US either for wanting to protect their produce operations...
I like to do some food prep. before we leave to make things easier when we're camping. I can't do that if I don't have the food in advance. Also, the one grocery store that's closest to where we're going doesn't seem to have prices much better than what I can get at home...I've been checking out their online flyers...maybe I'm missing something.
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May 15, 2004
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Richmond
http://www.crossbordershopping.ca/conte ... -guide-12/
LuckyDucky wrote:
Jul 23rd, 2010 12:16 pm
The Customs Agent made me throw away a 10 lb bag of potatoes. Potatoes are considered as fruit! Unfortunately, I knew a 10 lb bag of "U.S." potatoes was allowed (I found some reference on the Customs web site) but I didn't have a hard copy to show the agent. I will next time!
Root vegetables are restricted. I know loose carrots are prohibited (as posted on a sign in the grocery store I frequent), I would imagine the same would apply for loose potatoes as they are also a root vegetable. The packaged/"U.S." labelled 10 lb. bag might be allowed, but I imagine it's hard to remember all the little differences all the time (assuming the 10 lb. "U.S." bag is allowed).

Here's an interesting link, an "Automated Import Reference System". Type in the product in question, fill in the other info, and get your answer.
http://airs-sari.inspection.gc.ca/Airs_ ... spx?lang=1

Perhaps that 10 lb. bag of potatoes was prohibited because its state of origin could not be confirmed.
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Feb 26, 2003
3952 posts
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peroxide8888 wrote:
Jul 24th, 2010 10:47 am

Here's an interesting link, an "Automated Import Reference System". Type in the product in question, fill in the other info, and get your answer.
http://airs-sari.inspection.gc.ca/Airs_ ... spx?lang=1
Yeah, use AIRS. Print off what it says if you're concerned. Sometimes it comes down to what state it's from, what province it's coming into, etc.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 25, 2005
1752 posts
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North Vancouver
I check Peach and get these info:

HS Description

06 Live trees and other plants; bulbs, roots and the like; cut flowers and ornamental foliage
02 Other live plants (including their roots), cuttings and slips; mushroom spawn.
10 Unrooted cuttings and slips

OGD Extension

0009 Unrooted plants (include greenhouse grown) - fruits (edible) (nursery stock)
31 Peach - Unrooted plants (Prunus persica)


"OGD Extension HS Description", what does these means? :confused:




peroxide8888 wrote:
Jul 24th, 2010 10:47 am
http://www.crossbordershopping.ca/conte ... -guide-12/


Root vegetables are restricted. I know loose carrots are prohibited (as posted on a sign in the grocery store I frequent), I would imagine the same would apply for loose potatoes as they are also a root vegetable. The packaged/"U.S." labelled 10 lb. bag might be allowed, but I imagine it's hard to remember all the little differences all the time (assuming the 10 lb. "U.S." bag is allowed).

Here's an interesting link, an "Automated Import Reference System". Type in the product in question, fill in the other info, and get your answer.
http://airs-sari.inspection.gc.ca/Airs_ ... spx?lang=1

Perhaps that 10 lb. bag of potatoes was prohibited because its state of origin could not be confirmed.
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Nov 11, 2008
6206 posts
733 upvotes
sushiup wrote:
Jul 23rd, 2010 4:03 pm
I crossed the border with 3 bananas, and 1 apple at Niagara fall...they let me pass
SAME!!! :p
LOL :D
Deal Addict
Jul 14, 2009
1538 posts
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The general rule is that if the food is grown commercialy here in Canada, then it cannot be imported into Canada on a personal basis. This is to ensure that foreign pests / viruses do not enter the Canadian food chain.

Most fruits with pits i.e cherries, peaches, plums are grown here and not allowed. The same goes with apples.

Since we do not grow banana's or citrus fruits here in Canada, these fruit can be admitted into Canada.

Since meat, poultry and dairy are all highly regulated in the USA, they are all allowed into Canada in specific amounts. Meat, poultry and dairy from other countries are not allowed.

As previously posted the Automated Import Reference System is a great referance tool offered from by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
Member
Nov 17, 2009
251 posts
79 upvotes
Toronto
ecgz88 wrote:
Jul 26th, 2010 11:33 am
"OGD Extension HS Description", what does these means? :confused:
you are not done yet...go through the drop-downs for country of origin and end use below
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