Entrepreneurship & Small Business

can I use web domain name without registering business name?

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  • Aug 28th, 2014 9:39 am
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 30, 2006
811 posts
15 upvotes
Richmond Hill

can I use web domain name without registering business name?

Hi, a newbie question!

Just starting my own business, as a numbered Ontario corp. Also, registered a domain name I like, created an email address.

Can I use this email/website with my customers without registering business name? The actual agreement with customers will only have numbered corporation name, obviously, but can web site and email be used?

Thanks!
12 replies
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 12, 2013
815 posts
83 upvotes
Yes, you can buy as many domain names as you want. The domain name can be registered to your business or your own name.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 30, 2006
811 posts
15 upvotes
Richmond Hill
jesuisdanny wrote:
Aug 26th, 2014 11:21 pm
Yes, you can buy as many domain names as you want. The domain name can be registered to your business or your own name.
Question was different. Can I give email/website (let's say aaa@xxx.com and www.xxx.com) to customers without registering business name xxx?
Sr. Member
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Feb 12, 2013
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jimmi1977 wrote:
Aug 26th, 2014 11:54 pm
Question was different. Can I give email/website (let's say aaa@xxx.com and www.xxx.com) to customers without registering business name xxx?
I think you're mixing up two different things -- I take it you want to create email addresses using a domain name you own. Yes, you can create as many email addresses / alias as you need. Whether you've registered a business license or not has no bearings on your ability to do this.

I would look into something like Bluehost or some of the more reputable shared hosting providers. It sounds like you'd benefit from a managed solution, but it wouldn't be cost effective right now given that you're a new business. Perhaps get one of your tech savvy friends to help you with setting up your hosting plan.. Everything else after that can be learned easier. Generally, the customer service for these shared hosting sites will help you a bit more with these beginner's questions.
Sr. Member
Apr 8, 2006
954 posts
124 upvotes
Look into Google Apps for Business, it comes at a price but will manage your emails/calender/chat/contacts, it is a nice all in one solution.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 12, 2013
815 posts
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masalma wrote:
Aug 27th, 2014 12:33 am
Look into Google Apps for Business, it comes at a price but will manage your emails/calender/chat/contacts, it is a nice all in one solution.
+1 I use this personally, no complains.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 18, 2008
2617 posts
532 upvotes
Ottawa
If this is just for the marketing/contact aspect, then yes, you can register whatever site you like.

However, if you make references to those names (i.e. operating as those names, but legally registered as something else) then usually you'll need an additional business license.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 30, 2006
811 posts
15 upvotes
Richmond Hill
masalma wrote:
Aug 27th, 2014 12:33 am
Look into Google Apps for Business, it comes at a price but will manage your emails/calender/chat/contacts, it is a nice all in one solution.
Technically, I already created domain and email aliases. My question was legal. Can I actually use these emails/website without business license? Because legal name is "Ontario 12345 INC" and I don't have business license for "mywebsite.com"
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 30, 2006
811 posts
15 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Akitakara wrote:
Aug 27th, 2014 3:04 am
If this is just for the marketing/contact aspect, then yes, you can register whatever site you like.

However, if you make references to those names (i.e. operating as those names, but legally registered as something else) then usually you'll need an additional business license.
Hmm. Sending email from name@mywebsite.com to a customer, is this considered making reference to a name "mywebsite"?

I mean my relationship with customer is/will be based on a legal name "12345 Ontario inc" and this is just to avoid using personal email.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 17, 2013
5120 posts
1488 upvotes
Montreal
The only real issue is if your using the name and someone registers a business with that name. They might ask you to take it off of your website, email, etc. Just register it if it's a business. Not sure about your location but here its only about 80 bucks a year.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 18, 2002
6950 posts
581 upvotes
Toronto
It's perfectly legal and ok to use your domain without registering a business. You can use any domains as long as you're not wilfully infringing on trademark of an established business
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 18, 2008
2617 posts
532 upvotes
Ottawa
jimmi1977 wrote:
Aug 27th, 2014 7:42 am
Hmm. Sending email from name@mywebsite.com to a customer, is this considered making reference to a name "mywebsite"?

I mean my relationship with customer is/will be based on a legal name "12345 Ontario inc" and this is just to avoid using personal email.
It's completely fine. Case in point, you (may) have an email such as Jimmi@gmail.com, but that doesn't mean you own the domain/business gmail ;)

Likewise, you wouldn't see a domain name of John.Doe@12345OntarioInc.ca

You'd be making references to it if you call yourself "Pear Plumbing Providers" in advertisements, in a phone book, or (technically) if you keep talking to people and use that name.
Jr. Member
Jun 7, 2010
187 posts
16 upvotes
I think some aspects of your questions are well covered by other posters. I will add following based on one of my business ventures which caused us quite a nightmare. If you are registering a domain, you might find one that is available, however does not mean that you can use it. The reason being that if someone has a registered business name and/or a trademark, you are SOL unless you have ton of time and money to put on a fight. So do yourself a favor and if possible get a lawyer to do the incorporation work for you (it will cost you but it may or may be within your budget). Alternatively, you can do following searches:

1) Go to Corporations Canada and search for some combination of your prospective domain name to see if there are any other businesses with similar name or have partial name in their legal name. If they do, could be an issue (especially if they are exact same or even remotely close to your business domain)

2) Similarly, go to this link for your provincial incorporated registry and do same as # 1 here:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cd-dgc.nsf ... 01134.html

3) Look up trademark database to see if there is any thing someone has TM'd which is similar to your domain name: http://www.ic.gc.ca/app/opic-cipo/trdmr ... o?lang=eng

I am not sure what kind of business you starting up, but in our case (software industry), this caused us major headaches and we definately would have gladly given the lost cash due to reskinning our product and marketing hit. In our case, a Fortune 500 company who does nothing like what we did came in and basically bullied us, which we would have fought if we had the $$$ and resources on hand. In the end walking away and starting fresh was just cheaper!

Good luck.

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