Personal Finance

Can you photocopy a blank cheque for use?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 8th, 2008 5:56 pm
Tags:
None
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 7, 2006
2764 posts
27 upvotes
Vancouver

Can you photocopy a blank cheque for use?

This sounds a bit lame of a question, but I am just curious if one can do this:

Say I have only two cheques left from a particular account, can I photocopy a blank one and then write on it for use?

I understand that "cheques" have security features to prevent fraud, but the intention is not to write a cheque to give to my landload, or pay someone, etc.

Sometimes I deposit money from one of my account at Instition A to instition B. It is more of a money transfer and since I am depositing directly it into my account, I was wondering can an account holder photocopy one of their blank cheques and then use it to deposit it into another one of their accounts?

*There is other alternatives (order new cheques, electronic transfer, etc)but I'm just wondering if this is an option, in case at some point I would like to write a cheque for transfer sometime down the line.*
15 replies
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
42 upvotes
I suspect if you tried to pull such a stunt, the bank would call the cops on you or put you on some fraud watch list.

At the very least, if they do decide to accept the instrument without incident, you will be charged a fairly significant fee (at least $20 I think) for a non-standard, non-MICR'ed cheque.

Plus, of course, there would be lengthy hold periods involved.

Seriously, just get yourself a bank draft or bank cheque. They only cost $5 at the most.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 12, 2001
2822 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto
no, but you can always try setting up electronic transfer between the two institutions. (if it's available). Or you can ask your financial institution to give you a few temporary cheques if you're really in a jam.

If I was a teller and saw anyone giving me a photocopied cheque (even if it's from himself, to himself), I'd just laugh. Numbers on the bottom of a cheque are magnetic so it won't even work. Plus cheques are numbered so that duplicates get flagged by the system, then the fraud department steps in.

Maybe I should photocopy my VISA one day and see how the cashier likes it. I'll even bring ID proving I'm me.
Hi5exposure Photography
http://www.hi5exposure.com
Deal Addict
Apr 5, 2007
1103 posts
133 upvotes
Canada
majesus wrote:
Oct 8th, 2008 2:28 am
Sometimes I deposit money from one of my account at Instition A to instition B. It is more of a money transfer and since I am depositing directly it into my account, I was wondering can an account holder photocopy one of their blank cheques and then use it to deposit it into another one of their accounts?
As someone else already mentioned - photocopy cheques do not carry magnetic ink needed for the cheque to be accepted. Besides, most cheques will show a 'VOID' pattern when photocopied so I don't see how you can present that to a bank/CU (maybe they will flag you in their system?)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 7, 2003
2588 posts
298 upvotes
Ottawa
LOL...
You might as well try to photocopy $100 bills, and pay your rent with them :D
Moderator
User avatar
Mar 23, 2004
33100 posts
2103 upvotes
Markham
dux wrote:
Oct 8th, 2008 9:12 am
LOL...
You might as well try to photocopy $100 bills, and pay your rent with them :D
LMAO good one. You have to remember that cheque # will be duplicated which is a HUGE NO NO.

Go with a pcf or citizen's global chq account if u want...umm need free cheques :p
「もし、奇跡を起こせたら……」
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 6, 2007
1768 posts
15 upvotes
Technically, you can write a "cheque" on anything from a napkin, a scrap piece of paper to a rock; it's really just a note. But what a bank will accept is another thing.
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
42 upvotes
MrBurns wrote:
Oct 8th, 2008 1:51 pm
Technically, you can write a "cheque" on anything from a napkin, a scrap piece of paper to a rock; it's really just a note. But what a bank will accept is another thing.
+1

A 'cheque' is a form of private sector money. Unlike cheques from the Bank of Canada (we call those 'dollar bills'), nobody is obliged to negotiate any form of private money whatsoever to fulfill any debt or obligation.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Member
User avatar
Apr 23, 2008
451 posts
Edmonton, Alberta
You can write a cheque on anything. Furthermore, having two of the same cheque number doesn't matter at all (I've done it before - when I opened my account, I got three sample cheques with the same numbers as the ones I ordered). The only problem I could foresee is the absence of MICR encoding and the cheque not being of standard size, which would have you hit with a fee for not using CPA standard cheques.
Member
Jul 13, 2007
334 posts
Toronto
Let's digress from the usual knee-jerk responses that basically consist of "I've never heard of it being done, it involves banking, therefore it must be some kind of crime!" for a bit.

Here's what TD has to say about non-MICR cheques:
http://turl.ca/td-micr-cheques
No fees for doing so! (But I'm not sure if that's on the drawer's or depositor's side of things).

Yes, the person that writes the cheque is called the "drawer", because, legally, a cheque can be written on anything.

Manulife Bank states: "Using a non-MICR encoded cheque (i.e. photocopy) $10.00"

The only problem I can see is that the actual cheque number will be the same, but I believe that's just more for your own record-keeping than anything else.

As much as people like to say that a bank would refuse it, I'm not so sure, can they decline to negotiate (ie: cash) a cheque as long as it has been authorized by the drawer of that cheque? They can hold it to investigate, but I believe there are limits and restrictions on that.

And just to note to others, cheque-printing places (you don't have to use your bank's!!!) basically do what you just requested. They just print cheques with your account numbers on them (that you provide them), but they'll use their MICR toner ink for the parts required.

A cheque is just that, an instrument (ie: piece of paper) that is a promise to pay a certain amount of money to a certain person from a certain account #.

Another little known thing you can do with cheques is write them in different currencies, you can just write "US$35" or "50 EUR" on your CAD$ account cheques, but they'll be sure to charge you for the privilege!

So, in summary, it'll probably cause a hassle, but ultimately shouldn't be.
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
2866 posts
2270 upvotes
Toronto
A photocopy of a cheque would have VOID all over it. Therefore, anything you write on it is overridden by the VOID, even if you prove it's your account, etc. You'll have better luck with a blank sheet of paper.

It's like saying "anything I say is a lie", which negates anything you say afterwards (or does it? hmmm.....)
Member
Jul 13, 2007
334 posts
Toronto
dealtacular wrote:
Oct 8th, 2008 5:03 pm
I've worked in a bank, I wouldn't have allowed it. With additional checks and paperwork, perhaps, but unlikely. The bank is not legally obligated to accept all types of cheques AFAIK.
Now, the obvious question is, if one deposits it into an ATM, does that mean that the bank has accepted it, and needs to come up with a good reason for later refusing it?

And a-ok on the cheque number thing :)

Now to find some ultrafine milled iron oxide for my printer toner, ha.
× < >

Top