Politics, Religion & Controversial

Canada files WTO trade complaint against the US; prepares for NAFTA exit

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  • Jul 1st, 2018 5:07 pm
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^as long as trump willing to extend it till after he get out of office
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divx wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 2:30 pm
^as long as trump willing to extend it till after he get out of office
Political expediency will prevail. Michigan Wisconsin and Pennsylvania are huge NAFTA beneficiaries.
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mr_raider wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 1:54 pm
To play the devil's advocate, how long will Trump, or Trumpism last? It may be more advantageous to swallow the loss of NAFTA and wait to see what happens in 2020. Trade deals are negotiated for decades, not 4 year terms.
I agree...Trudeau has these silly ideological crusades he's on, trying to put human rights, gender rights, climate change nonsense into trade deals and just spoiling it for us. Whatever the US is offering, we are still better to take it and run.

The only hiccup would be if Trump is using this to kick Mexico out of "NAFTA" permanently, which would benefit both of us overall. As mentioned, having a 3rd world country compete freely for business with two first world countries isn't that great. Not much of our cheap stuff comes from Mexico, other than some produce. We get a ton more of it from other Central/South American nations...Mexico has pretty average to low quality produce from my experience.
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tk1000 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 2:28 pm




Idnk, @webdoctors has to answer this question
Just an example of blue collar industry that's been dying. Manufacturing shifted to the cheapest place, which has now become Mexico.
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mr_raider wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 2:44 pm
Political expediency will prevail. Michigan Wisconsin and Pennsylvania are huge NAFTA beneficiaries.
This argument isn't playing well in actual practice. States aren't buying the argument that a NAFTA withdrawal will be disastrous. States like Michigan are already seeing renewed investment and thousands of new jobs due to the threat of Trump pulling out of NAFTA.
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I'd love to see the look on Brian Mulroney's smug face when NAFTA falls apart.
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webdoctors wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 2:57 pm
Just an example of blue collar industry that's been dying. Manufacturing shifted to the cheapest place, which has now become Mexico.
Natural gas killling the coal industry...

Coal on the Chopping Block as Trump Ponders NAFTA Withdrawal
https://www.triplepundit.com/2018/01/co ... ithdrawal/

The U.S. coal industry already took one hard hit this month, when federal regulators appointed by President Donald Trump turned down a request to protect aging coal power plants. Now the President is poised to deal a knockout blow to beleaguered coal stakeholders. Trump is widely expected to pull the country out of NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, a move that is all but certain to lower the cost of natural gas and kill the market for coal power generation in the US.
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LeisureSuitL wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 2:50 pm
I agree...Trudeau has these silly ideological crusades he's on, trying to put human rights, gender rights, climate change nonsense into trade deals and just spoiling it for us. Whatever the US is offering, we are still better to take it and run.

The only hiccup would be if Trump is using this to kick Mexico out of "NAFTA" permanently, which would benefit both of us overall. As mentioned, having a 3rd world country compete freely for business with two first world countries isn't that great. Not much of our cheap stuff comes from Mexico, other than some produce. We get a ton more of it from other Central/South American nations...Mexico has pretty average to low quality produce from my experience.
Have you bought a car recently? Ford, GM, Nissan and VW have massive production facilities in Mexico. A lot of parts from other makers are from Mexico. The price of cars would definitely go up. And the profitability of GM and Ford would take a hit.
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LeisureSuitL wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 2:50 pm
I agree...Trudeau has these silly ideological crusades he's on, trying to put human rights, gender rights, climate change nonsense into trade deals and just spoiling it for us. Whatever the US is offering, we are still better to take it and run.
Prime Minister Trudeau commented on NAFTA negotiations saying although Canada remained committed to negotiation but wouldn't accept any deal.

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mr_raider wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 4:16 pm
Have you bought a car recently? Ford, GM, Nissan and VW have massive production facilities in Mexico. A lot of parts from other makers are from Mexico. The price of cars would definitely go up. And the profitability of GM and Ford would take a hit.
I would agree with you normally, but the Honda Civic is built here in Canada and that doesn't ever seem to go out of style, or get outrageously expensive. There are plenty of affordable models built in Canada/USA that I doubt there would be THAT much impact for the main production. Supply chain though, that's another issue as who knows exactly where hundreds of thousands of small parts are produced.

I just don't see it impacting (significantly) anything other than the lowest models of cars. Supply chain changes might impact every model potentially, but there would be more flexibility to compensate for those price increases.
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LeisureSuitL wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 4:42 pm
I would agree with you normally, but the Honda Civic is built here in Canada and that doesn't ever seem to go out of style, or get outrageously expensive. There are plenty of affordable models built in Canada/USA that I doubt there would be THAT much impact for the main production. Supply chain though, that's another issue as who knows exactly where hundreds of thousands of small parts are produced.

I just don't see it impacting (significantly) anything other than the lowest models of cars. Supply chain changes might impact every model potentially, but there would be more flexibility to compensate for those price increases.
but the parts are likely coming from other countries, nothing is built entirely from one country anymore, even the tools are sourced from all over the world.
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User455957 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 10:45 am
The U.S wouldn't suffer as bad as Canada, but they'd suffer. Canada's the US biggest trade partner, and not in some protective vacuum immune from trade consequences. Check out OP's map of. Everyone of those states (voters) would suffer.
Nope. China displaced Canada as the U.S's largest trading partner since 2015.
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divx wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 4:49 pm
but the parts are likely coming from other countries, nothing is built entirely from one country anymore, even the tools are sourced from all over the world.
Yeah, this is exactly why I don't think our expenses are going to go up that much. In the example of cars, so many parts come from China, Japan, Korea, plus a massive chunk of parts that are still built in the US. When I go on Rockauto to shop, I am always amazed at how many aftermarket parts are available, and cheap, all Made in the USA.

Maybe border states will take a hit on grocery prices (for whatever comes from Mexico like Avocado, grapes, etc.), but I can't see a very big impact overall.
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gei wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 9:41 pm
um... what?
Canada has failed to develop more trade with other countries. We have also failed to diversify more our economy across sectors. RE or Pot bubbles better not pop anytime soon.
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peli33 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 5:12 pm
Canada has failed to develop more trade with other countries. We have also failed to diversify more our economy across sectors. RE or Pot bubbles better not pop anytime soon.
Pot bubble will probably burst...I heard an analyst talking about Canopy Growth having like a 6 billion dollar valuation...meaning they would have to have like 1 billion in sales in order to have that make sense.

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