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Canada is now home to some of the toughest anti-piracy rules in the world: Geist

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  • Aug 12th, 2017 6:28 pm
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Canada is now home to some of the toughest anti-piracy rules in the world: Geist

Canada is now home to some of the toughest anti-piracy rules in the world
http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2017/03/why- ... come-next/

- Canada last overhauled its copyright law in 2012, bringing to a conclusion more than a decade of failed bills and lobbying pressure.
- the change in Canadian law is best exemplified by a ruling last week from the Federal Court of Canada involving the sale and distribution of “modchips”
- last year, the federal court issued sweeping injunctions against multiple distributors of set-top boxes that turn standard televisions into “smart TVs” by enabling users to access a wide range of video content found online
- Canadians have also demonstrated a willingness to pay for content online.
- The notice-and-notice system deployed by copyright owners to alert Internet users of alleged infringements has been widely misused with the inclusion in e-mail notices of demands for settlements that were never envisioned by policy makers

The government prepares to conduct a statutorily-mandated review of the Copyright law. Geist syas the two ministers responsible for copyright – Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains and Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly – should be working to tweak the law to address concerns involving misuse and restrictions on innovation.
Further, the absence of fair use may hamstring innovation as it leaves Canadian companies at a disadvantage when compared with innovative, fair-use-based economies such as the United States, Israel, South Korea, and Singapore. When coupled with the restrictive digital-lock rules that suffer from narrowly interpreted exceptions, many may find the current Canadian copyright law environment supportive of cracking down on infringement but lacking the flexibility needed for new creativity and innovation.
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Then why have no canadians been sued and paid damages for illegal download and streaming?
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Doubleshot wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 6:06 pm
Then why have no canadians been sued and paid damages for illegal download and streaming?
Because it is not law yet. Fast tracking is just an expression, not a fact :)
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Doubleshot wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 6:06 pm
Then why have no Canadians been sued and paid damages for illegal download and streaming?
Good point. The title of the article is misleading.
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Heck, with the backlog in our Courts, here in BC, murder & drug charges takes years to get to Court. You think they have the time to prosecute copyright cases?
Maybe His head just keeps his two ears apart.
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Pete_Coach wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 9:35 am
Because it is not law yet. Fast tracking is just an expression, not a fact :)
Geist is referring to existing Copyright Laws enacted under Harper. No one knows what the new overhaul will look like. More? Less?

For now the law is there but no real legal enforcement is done for individual violations. Max average Joe is getting are threatening letters to pay a settlement but nothing was tested in court yet. We saw the Kodi Addon guy getting raided, streaming boxes with illegal addons getting the chop. These are initiatives to target the source at best.
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insync44 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 9:52 am
Heck, with the backlog in our Courts, here in BC, murder & drug charges takes years to get to Court. You think they have the time to prosecute copyright cases?
Of course when corporations are paying the bill......
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peli33 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 11:31 am
Geist is referring to existing Copyright Laws enacted under Harper. No one knows what the new overhaul will look like. More? Less?

For now the law is there but no real legal enforcement is done for individual violations. Max average Joe is getting are threatening letters to pay a settlement but nothing was tested in court yet. We saw the Kodi Addon guy getting raided, streaming boxes with illegal addons getting the chop. These are initiatives to target the source at best.
That is nothing new though. I havent been to flea market in a long time but I remember cops shutting illegal satellite stuff back then. Pirated Games/DVD's was targeted in Pacific mall. They sold illegal copyright stuff in broad daylight.

Im looking at the US and if laws like that start being applied over here then Canadians are in trouble. You have americans getting their internet cut due to this. Some pay thousands of dollars.

TPP was the important one and they will try again im sure.
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Just use VPN or proxy and one could care less about some funny laws.
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insync44 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 9:52 am
Heck, with the backlog in our Courts, here in BC, murder & drug charges takes years to get to Court. You think they have the time to prosecute copyright cases?
Copyright would be civil cases, so backlog in criminal cases isn't relevant
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ukrainiandude wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 4:51 pm
Just use VPN or proxy and one could care less about some funny laws.
Eventually not quite that easy. Originally under the proposed TPP Cdn Telcos would be responsible for reporting/ catching violators. The Telcos stated it would take time to design and install software that would monitor customers in detail. They were happy with this scenario as it would mean no outsiders would be viewing their customer's usage and other customer info= a breach of privacy. Anti- Piracy laws will go through eventually and it was a no brainer when I saw Telcos literally giving away unlimited at low prices. Using a proxy would eventually be a huge red flag.
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magoot wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 5:30 pm
Eventually not quite that easy. Originally under the proposed TPP Cdn Telcos would be responsible for reporting/ catching violators. The Telcos stated it would take time to design and install software that would monitor customers in detail. They were happy with this scenario as it would mean no outsiders would be viewing their customer's usage and other customer info= a breach of privacy. Anti- Piracy laws will go through eventually and it was a no brainer when I saw Telcos literally giving away unlimited at low prices. Using a proxy would eventually be a huge red flag.
Proxy and VPN or just proxy?
Also I don't think it is that easy to filter and to prove traffic and its origins.
Also I amsure the inventors of p2p will come out with the solution.
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ukrainiandude wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 5:50 pm
Proxy and VPN or just proxy?
Also I don't think it is that easy to filter and to prove traffic and its origins.
Also I amsure the inventors of p2p will come out with the solution.
We are talking about the very companies that rolled out and maintain the Net. Telcos already stated it could be done and it would be to their benefit re: their own streaming services. These large corps ( BHell MktCap= $53 B, Robbers= $26 B) would have no problem setting up a system. TPP would've made policing a lot more easier. Many yrs ago I was heavily involved within the Community but gave up my involvement when it became too risky. Believe me I'm not happy about it and was overjoyed when TPP fell apart.

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