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Canada's foreign-born population soars to 6.8 million

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  • May 13th, 2013 1:57 pm
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Canada's foreign-born population soars to 6.8 million

he debut of Canada's controversial census replacement survey shows there are more foreign-born people in the country than ever before, at a proportion not seen in almost a century.

They're young, they're suburban, and they're mainly from Asia, although Africans are arriving in growing numbers.

- Follow interactive National Household Survey highlights

But the historical comparisons are few and far between in the National Household Survey, which Statistics Canada designed, at Prime Minister Stephen Harper's behest, to replace the cancelled long-form survey, which was eliminated.


The new survey of almost three million people shows that Canada is home to 6.8 million foreign-born residents, or 20.6 per cent of the population, compared with 19.8 per cent in 2006, and the highest in the G8 group of rich countries.

It also shows that aboriginal populations have surged by 20 per cent over the past five years, now representing 4.3 per cent of Canada's population, up from 3.8 per cent in the 2006 census.

Almost one in five people living in Canada is a visible minority.

And in nine different municipalities, those visible minorities are actually the majority.

Statistics Canada isn't handing out detailed comparisons to the results shown in the 2006 census.

That's because many comparisons with the past can only made reliably at a national or provincial level, said Marc Hamel, director general of the census. He said the agency suppressed data from 1,100 mainly small communities because of data quality, compared with about 200 that were suppressed in 2006.

"For a voluntary survey, it has very good quality. We have a high quality of results at a national level," said Hamel.

Until 2006, questions on immigration, aboriginals and religion were asked in the mandatory long-form census that went to one-fifth of Canadian households. When the Conservatives cancelled that part of the census in 2010, Statistics Canada replaced it with a new questionnaire that went to slightly more households, but was voluntary instead of mandatory, skewing the data when it comes to making direct comparisons.

- Read the geographic breakdown of the NHS

The result is a detailed picture of what Canada looked like in 2011, but it is a static picture that in many instances lacks the context of what the country looked like in the past at the local level.

Politicians weigh in on NHS results

Industry Minister Christian Paradis, however, said the NHS "provides useful and usable data for Canadian communities, representing 97 per cent of the population," and that more Canadians responded to the survey than its predecessor.

"More than 2.5 million households returned the survey, achieving a response rate of 68 per cent and making this the largest voluntary survey ever conducted in Canada," Paradis said in a release Wednesday. “Our government will be looking at options to improve the quality and reliability of the data generated by the 2016 census cycle.”

Treasury Board president Tony Clement, who was industry minister when the long-form census was killed, said the NHS provides "very definitely useful and usable data...."

"I understand that more Canadians answered the national household survey than ever answered the mandatory long-form census," he said after the Conservative caucus meeting in Ottawa.

"I think that's great that we can have more Canadians answering these surveys. ... We've balanced off the government's continual need for data with privacy concerns. I think we've found the right balance. That's my assessment."

However, Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau told reporters after his party's caucus meeting that he "absolutely" would reinstate the long-form census.

"It boggles my mind a little bit that in the data-driven 21st century, we would have a government that would choose to know less about its citizens, and about the needs and about getting good data on what people are struggling with...," he said. "We have a government that has decided that it doesn't want to know what Canadians are facing."

Opposition Leader Thomas Mulcair also criticized the NHS, saying after his party's caucus meeting that the survey provides "a much lower rate of return, less information which to base government programs on, and taxpayer dollars are not going to be spent as efficiently as possible.”

P.E.I. Premier Robert Ghiz, who was in Ottawa on Wednesday and asked by reporters to comment on the NHS, said there are concerns switching from a mandatory to a voluntary survey would provide less information "to help make evidence-based decisions around public policy."

"The long-form census has changed in the last number of years. Hopefully it will change again in the future to better reflect the information Canadians are looking for."

Most immigrants from Asia, Mideast

The NHS results indicated that, overwhelmingly, most recent immigrants are from Asia, including the Middle East, but to a lesser degree than in the early part of the decade. Between 2006 and 2011, 56.9 per cent of immigrants were Asian, compared with the 60 per cent of the immigrants that came between 2001 and 2005.

- Read more about why the long-form census was dropped

The Philippines was the top source country for recent immigrants, with 13 per cent, according to the National Household Survey. although a footnote warns that the survey data "is not in line" with data collected by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. China and India were second and third as source countries.

The decline in the share of Asian immigration was offset by growth in newcomers from Africa in particular, and also Caribbean countries and Central and South America.

As in the past, newcomers are settling in Canada's biggest cities and are generally younger than the established population. Newcomers have a median age of 31.7 years, compared to the Canadian-born population median age of 37.3.

Of Canada's 6.8 million immigrants, 91 per cent of them live in metropolitan areas, and 63.4 per cent live in the Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver areas.

The Toronto area continues to be the top destination for immigrants, but newcomers are increasingly settling elsewhere, especially in the Prairies. Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax and Montreal all saw their shares of newcomers expand, compared to the 2006 census.

While Statistics Canada did not make the comparison, the Toronto area drew in just 32.8 per cent of recent immigrants in the past five years, compared with 40.4 per cent in the 2006 census and 43.1 per cent in the 2001 census.

- Read about how Jedis aren't as much of a religion force

Analysts had been anxious to see whether province-driven immigration policies had led to growing numbers of immigrants settling in smaller towns and cities, but the NHS does not make comparisons at that level.

The survey does show that suburbs in particular are a magnet for visible minorities. The Toronto suburbs of Markham, Brampton, Mississauga and Richmond Hill all have visible minority communities that make up well over half the population. The same pattern is seen in areas around Vancouver: in Richmond, Greater Vancouver, Burnaby and Surrey.

Aboriginal population rises

Aboriginal peoples are also claiming a larger share of the Canadian population. More than 1.4 million people told Statistics Canada they had an aboriginal identity, comprising 4.3 per cent of the population compared to 3.8 per cent in the 2006 census.

The aboriginal population grew by more than 20 per cent between 2006 and 2011, compared with 5.2 per cent for the non-aboriginal population. However, Statscan warns that not all of this growth was because of people having more babies. Rather, changes in legal definitions and survey methodology account for some of the difference.

First Nations populations grew by 22.0 per cent, while Métis people grew 16.3 per cent and Inuit by 18.1 per cent.

"While we have concerns about the new process for collecting information, the results released today further highlight the importance of First Nations as one of the fastest growing and youngest population, and as drivers of and partners to economic development," Assembly of First Nations Chief Shawn Atleo said in a statement Wednesday.

The data so far does not delve into social conditions among Aboriginal peoples, but the NHS does offer a glimpse. Aboriginal children are far more likely to be living with a single parent, usually a mother. Half the foster children under the age of 14 are aboriginal, the survey shows. And less than half of First Nations children live with both parents.

The AFN also expressed concern about data from the survey that showed that the number of people speaking First Nations languages is declining.

As for religion, Canadians are increasingly turning their backs.

While two-thirds of Canada's population said it was Christian, almost one quarter of respondents said they had no religious affiliation at all. That's up from 16.5 per cent a decade earlier in the 2001 census.

At the same time, immigration patterns have led to growth in the numbers of Muslim, Hindu, Sikh and Buddhist worshippers.

The other two parts of the NHS will be released on June 26 (covering labour, education, place of work, commuting to work, mobility and migration and language of work) and Aug. 14 (providing data on income, earnings, housing and shelter costs).

With files from CBC News
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[OP]
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OTTAWA - The debut of Canada's controversial census replacement survey shows there are more foreign-born people in the country than ever before, at a proportion not seen in almost a century.

They're young, they're suburban, and they're mainly from Asia, although Africans are arriving in growing numbers.

But the historical comparisons are few and far between in the National Household Survey, which Statistics Canada designed — at Prime Minister Stephen Harper's behest — to replace the cancelled long-form census of the past.

The new survey of almost three million people shows that Canada is home to 6.8 million foreign-born residents — or 20.6 per cent of the population, compared with 19.8 per cent in 2006, and the highest in the G8 group of rich countries.

It also shows that aboriginal populations have surged by 20 per cent over the past five years, now representing 4.3 per cent of Canada's population — up from 3.8 per cent in the 2006 census.

Almost one in five people living in Canada is a visible minority. And in nine different municipalities, those visible minorities are actually the majority.

However, Statistics Canada isn't handing out detailed comparisons to the results shown in the 2006 census.

That's because many comparisons with the past can only made reliably at a national or provincial level, said Marc Hamel, director general of the census. He said the agency suppressed data from 1,100 mainly small communities because of data quality, compared with about 200 that were suppressed in 2006.

"For a voluntary survey, it has very good quality. We have a high quality of results at a national level," said Hamel.

Until 2006, questions on immigration, aboriginals and religion were asked in the mandatory long-form census that went to one-fifth of Canadian households. When the Conservatives cancelled that part of the census in 2010, Statistics Canada replaced it with a new questionnaire that went to slightly more households, but was voluntary instead of mandatory, skewing the data when it comes to making direct comparisons.

The result is a detailed picture of what Canada looked like in 2011, but it is a static picture that in many instances lacks the context of what the country looked like in the past at the local level.

What the NHS does show is that, overwhelmingly, most recent immigrants are from Asia, including the Middle East, but to a lesser degree than in the early part of the decade. Between 2006 and 2011, 56.9 per cent of immigrants were Asian, compared with the 60 per cent of the immigrants that came between 2001 and 2005.

The Philippines was the top source country for recent immigrants, with 13 per cent, according to the National Household Survey — although a footnote warns that the survey data "is not in line" with data collected by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. China and India were second and third as source countries.

The decline in the share of Asian immigration was offset by growth in newcomers from Africa in particular, and also Caribbean countries and Central and South America.

As in the past, newcomers are settling in Canada's biggest cities and are generally younger than the established population. Newcomers have a median age of 31.7 years, compared to the Canadian-born population median age of 37.3.

Of Canada's 6.8 million immigrants, 91 per cent of them live in metropolitan areas, and 63.4 per cent live in the Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver areas.

The Toronto area continues to be the top destination for immigrants, but newcomers are increasingly settling elsewhere, especially in the Prairies. Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax and Montreal all saw their shares of newcomers expand compared to the 2006 census.

While Statscan did not make the comparison, the Toronto area drew in just 32.8 per cent of recent immigrants in the past five years, compared with 40.4 per cent in the 2006 census and 43.1 per cent in the 2001 census.

Analysts had been anxious to see whether province-driven immigration policies had led to growing numbers of immigrants settling in smaller towns and cities, but the NHS does not make comparisons at that level.

The survey does show that suburbs in particular are a magnet for visible minorities. The Toronto suburbs of Markham, Brampton, Mississauga and Richmond Hill all have visible minority communities that make up well over half the population. The same pattern is seen in areas around Vancouver: in Richmond, Greater Vancouver, Burnaby and Surrey.

Aboriginal Peoples are also claiming a larger share of the Canadian population. More than 1.4 million people told Statscan they had an aboriginal identity, comprising 4.3 per cent of the population compared to 3.8 per cent in the 2006 census.

The aboriginal population grew by more than 20 per cent between 2006 and 2011, compared with 5.2 per cent for the non-aboriginal population. However, Statscan warns that not all of this growth was because of people having more babies. Rather, changes in legal definitions and survey methodology account for some of the difference.

First Nations populations grew by 22.0 per cent, while Metis people grew 16.3 per cent and Inuit by 18.1 per cent.

While the data so far does not delve into social conditions among Aboriginal Peoples, the NHS does offer a glimpse. Aboriginal children are far more likely to be living with a single parent, usually a mother. Half the foster children under the age of 14 are aboriginal, the survey shows. And less than half of First Nations children live with both parents.

As for religion, Canadians are increasingly turning their backs. While two-thirds of Canada's population said it was Christian, almost one quarter of respondents said they had no religious affiliation at all. That's up from 16.5 per cent a decade earlier in the 2001 census.

At the same time, immigration patterns have led to growth in the numbers of Muslim, Hindu, Sikh and Buddhist worshippers.
Deal Fanatic
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Jan 13, 2005
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Why do you have a sad face avatar? There is nothing wrong with foreign born citizens. Canadians aren't having enough children without immigration who will pay taxes?
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Thanks for the troll post news update, OP!
AcidBomber wrote:
Jan 19th, 2012 8:09 pm
Warning to all (trolls) - next person to post any flamebaits (religious, sexist, racial, etc) gets an automatic ban.
[OP]
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Diafel wrote:
May 10th, 2013 12:39 am
Why Africans?
People are jealous of rich Asian immigrants ... so now they prefer African refugees to receive welfare in Canada.
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May 28, 2012
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I think we are capable of finding our own news articles to read. There is a place for discourse, but now you are just spamming the forum with all these posts.
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Mars2012 wrote:
May 10th, 2013 1:09 am
I think we are capable of finding our own news articles to read. There is a place for discourse, but now you are just spamming the forum with all these posts.
Without these facts from statscan, our discourse becomes useless trash talk.
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Seriously, TLDR, stopped after a few paragraphs. At the end of the day, who cares. This only proves how multicultural we are and welcoming of immigrants. That trend is simply continuing to grow. We all know this. Nothing new here. It also comes at no surprise that the greatest surges are especially from countries where living conditions and standards are below ours.
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This is most excellent. We should further triple immigration. The quicker this country becomes a complete craphole the better. I'm anxiously waiting to say I told you so.
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This is great and wonderful news. We need to immigrate more Asians into Canada, so that we can further dominate the school system and universities with our progeny. First the schools.. Then the corporate management! No more golf and hockey talk. Ping Pong glory FTW!
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Jun 26, 2010
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Diafel wrote:
May 10th, 2013 12:39 am
Why Africans?
Superhucard wrote:
May 10th, 2013 1:01 am
People are jealous of rich Asian immigrants ... so now they prefer African refugees to receive welfare in Canada.
Not everyone who immigrates from Africa is a refugee. A large number of these people have degrees. A growing number of them are setting themselves up favorably over here.

But believe what you want to believe.
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May 25, 2005
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Phoenix3434 wrote:
May 10th, 2013 6:42 am
This is great and wonderful news. We need to immigrate more Asians into Canada, so that we can further dominate the school system and universities with our progeny. First the schools.. Then the corporate management! No more golf and hockey talk. Ping Pong glory FTW!
This terrible idea considering driving schools.
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Blanket_Man wrote:
May 10th, 2013 8:46 am
Not everyone who immigrates from Africa is a refugee. A large number of these people have degrees. A growing number of them are setting themselves up favorably over here.

But believe what you want to believe.

i.e. Arlene from Dragons Den
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