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Canadian Citizen looking to find a job in USA Looking for some advise

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 26th, 2019 10:56 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 4, 2014
108 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto

Canadian Citizen looking to find a job in USA Looking for some advise

Hello!
I am a Canadian Citizen moved in Canada as Skilled immigrant 7 years ago.
I have a background in food Science -Food Chemist and I recently graduated from McGill in a master program in food science.
I have find it very hard to find a job in my field and Actually work for A Board school in Ontario as Educational Assistant (no relation with my background), but i have Previous experience on Research and Government and Food Safety.
I see that there is a bigger job market in USA than in Canada.
My question is when you apply for a job in USA (when they ask do you require sponsorship- (I answer NO- but i am not quite sure if a Canadian Citizen does require a sponsorship from any employee in USA.
second: does you have greater chances if you place an actual address in USA( I have family in two regions of USA and it is there that i want to move Philadelphia and NY.) or I should put the postal code from Canada.
I can't stand no more the fact that I keep receiving Phone calls from Food companies, and sometimes i have been invited for interviews but in all cases they hire internal (switching from other departments), and i have lost hopes that i will find any place in my field of expertise, that's the reason I want to move in USA.
Any help or advice that what are the chances for a technician in the field of food Laboratory services, regulatory specialists, R&D or Quality assurance and Food safety would be very appreciated.
And also some advice on how to find suitable companies that may be interested in Canadian citizens?
Thank you in advance
21 replies
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2018
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Ok first things first, as a non-US citizen/permanent resident you will always require sponsorship to work in the US. As a Canadian you qualify for a TN, which makes things much easier as you don't have to go through the H-1B lottery.

Second, I really don't think having a US vs Canadian address will make much of a difference. If the company is open to hiring foreign workers and sponsoring their visa, more likely than not they're also willing to work with them on relocation. If you want to maximize your chances, then focus on big multinational companies as they're very likely to have quite a few foreign workers, and have the experience and resources needed to deal with the immigration side of things.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 4, 2014
108 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto
arkane wrote:
Aug 10th, 2019 11:48 pm
Ok first things first, as a non-US citizen/permanent resident you will always require sponsorship to work in the US. As a Canadian you qualify for a TN, which makes things much easier as you don't have to go through the H-1B lottery.

Second, I really don't think having a US vs Canadian address will make much of a difference. If the company is open to hiring foreign workers and sponsoring their visa, more likely than not they're also willing to work with them on relocation. If you want to maximize your chances, then focus on big multinational companies as they're very likely to have quite a few foreign workers, and have the experience and resources needed to deal with the immigration side of things.
Thank you for your information.
My understanding was that Canadian Citizens doesn't require sponsorship, second when I have applied for openings, There are Questions like do you require sponsorship to come in USA, (for that I was unsure). From different conversations I have heard that it is very difficult to make a company sponsor you to work for them.
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Apr 21, 2014
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Alberta
anisaem wrote:
Aug 12th, 2019 10:32 pm
Thank you for your information.
My understanding was that Canadian Citizens doesn't require sponsorship, second when I have applied for openings, There are Questions like do you require sponsorship to come in USA, (for that I was unsure). From different conversations I have heard that it is very difficult to make a company sponsor you to work for them.
It all depends. Is your field of study on the list of job ms eligible for a TN visa? If it is then you can say you don’t require sponsorship. If it is NOT on the list then you will have to get sponsorship via H1B etc.

Also are you married ? If you are and you go to the states on a TN visa your spouse and kids get dependent visas and are NOT eligible to work.

I am in the states on a TN visa and my company has just started the green card process for me.
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Aug 18, 2018
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abc123yyz wrote:
Aug 15th, 2019 12:48 pm
It all depends. Is your field of study on the list of job ms eligible for a TN visa? If it is then you can say you don’t require sponsorship. If it is NOT on the list then you will have to get sponsorship via H1B etc.

Also are you married ? If you are and you go to the states on a TN visa your spouse and kids get dependent visas and are NOT eligible to work.

I am in the states on a TN visa and my company has just started the green card process for me.
I don't really want to have this stupid argument again, but unless you were explicitly told or checked with HR beforehand, do NOT say you DON'T require sponsorship. Any time you require work authorization to legally work in the US, you require sponsorship.
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Apr 21, 2014
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arkane wrote:
Aug 15th, 2019 5:39 pm
I don't really want to have this stupid argument again, but unless you were explicitly told or checked with HR beforehand, do NOT say you DON'T require sponsorship. Any time you require work authorization to legally work in the US, you require sponsorship.
Technically you are correct. But I would never put that on my application. In reality, when companies think sponsorship they thing h1b or green card and significant costs. A TN visa just requires a support letter (which I drafted), and no costs to the employer. I just explained what a TN visa is during the interview. I am on my second employer here in the states, and my 3rd TN visa. I would not have gotten an interview for my current role if I said “I require sponsorship” on my resume. I explained what a TN visa was during the interview process.
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2018
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Well no I'm not saying you should advertise it on your resume, but I also don't think it's right to say you don't need sponsorship and then leave it at that. That basically amounts to misrepresentation. If you explained in the interview what a TN is and how to get one that's totally fine.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 4, 2014
108 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto
abc123yyz wrote:
Aug 15th, 2019 12:48 pm
It all depends. Is your field of study on the list of job ms eligible for a TN visa? If it is then you can say you don’t require sponsorship. If it is NOT on the list then you will have to get sponsorship via H1B etc.

Also are you married ? If you are and you go to the states on a TN visa your spouse and kids get dependent visas and are NOT eligible to work.

I am in the states on a TN visa and my company has just started the green card process for me.
Yes I have my spouse and kids, the ides is me to be principal application for my family at the beginning and if we succeeds later we may have other opportunities.
thanks for the feedback everyone in this forum
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 4, 2014
108 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto
abc123yyz wrote:
Aug 16th, 2019 11:07 am
Technically you are correct. But I would never put that on my application. In reality, when companies think sponsorship they thing h1b or green card and significant costs. A TN visa just requires a support letter (which I drafted), and no costs to the employer. I just explained what a TN visa is during the interview. I am on my second employer here in the states, and my 3rd TN visa. I would not have gotten an interview for my current role if I said “I require sponsorship” on my resume. I explained what a TN visa was during the interview process.
My first intend when i made this question is when you apply in portals like Indeed or zipreqruriter, in most of the cases I do not send cover letter, unless is required. But when I apply on company site (some of the job applications on indeed send you to the company website) I write that i am a Canadian Citizen looking to find an opportunity in USA. I have gotten replies back from companies, but they were looking for some specific skills i don't have. So I believe if they are interested in your profile, then is the time to discuss the details of N application process.
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2018
1684 posts
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anisaem wrote:
Aug 16th, 2019 10:36 pm

Yes I have my spouse and kids, the ides is me to be principal application for my family at the beginning and if we succeeds later we may have other opportunities.
thanks for the feedback everyone in this forum
If your spouse and/or kids want to work as well, they'll each need to get their own TN, since TD (dependents of TN beneficiary) are NOT allowed to work.
anisaem wrote:
Aug 16th, 2019 10:43 pm
My first intend when i made this question is when you apply in portals like Indeed or zipreqruriter, in most of the cases I do not send cover letter, unless is required. But when I apply on company site (some of the job applications on indeed send you to the company website) I write that i am a Canadian Citizen looking to find an opportunity in USA. I have gotten replies back from companies, but they were looking for some specific skills i don't have. So I believe if they are interested in your profile, then is the time to discuss the details of N application process.
Honestly, any medium-large sized company would know about TN so no need to explain further. If it's a small company that has never done this before, then you can spend some time in the interview explaining what it is and how easy it is (relatively speaking) to get approved for one.
Deal Addict
Oct 18, 2014
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OP, aside from being honest, reach out to recruiters on LinkedIn.
Member
Jun 19, 2007
491 posts
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Halifax
arkane wrote:
Aug 16th, 2019 3:07 pm
Well no I'm not saying you should advertise it on your resume, but I also don't think it's right to say you don't need sponsorship and then leave it at that. That basically amounts to misrepresentation. If you explained in the interview what a TN is and how to get one that's totally fine.
The problem is you'll never even get to the interview stage if you say you require sponsorship.

The immigration system in the US is a frigging mess. Most companies aside from the big ones with legal staff are wholly ignorant of it, only know the very basics, and that it's expensive, time-consuming, and generally a huge hassle. You're fortunate that unemployment is at record lows now, but you say you recently graduated. So unless you're bringing something amazing to the table beyond a degree (the US has lots of new grads too....) why would a company want to go to the (albeit limited) hassle of bringing you down?

This was the cold hard truth I learned after I graduated. Instead, I worked in Canada for a few years for a F500 that had offices all over the world and liked mobile employees, pushed hard, eventually got to the states, then over to Asia. A bit different since my goal was to work in different countries vs work period, but the sad truth I found, is that Non-Citizen/GC holders are all lumped into the same category by probably 80% of companies. And that category is "unhireable".
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Aug 18, 2018
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seadog83 wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 12:32 pm
The problem is you'll never even get to the interview stage if you say you require sponsorship.

The immigration system in the US is a frigging mess. Most companies aside from the big ones with legal staff are wholly ignorant of it, only know the very basics, and that it's expensive, time-consuming, and generally a huge hassle. You're fortunate that unemployment is at record lows now, but you say you recently graduated. So unless you're bringing something amazing to the table beyond a degree (the US has lots of new grads too....) why would a company want to go to the (albeit limited) hassle of bringing you down?

This was the cold hard truth I learned after I graduated. Instead, I worked in Canada for a few years for a F500 that had offices all over the world and liked mobile employees, pushed hard, eventually got to the states, then over to Asia. A bit different since my goal was to work in different countries vs work period, but the sad truth I found, is that Non-Citizen/GC holders are all lumped into the same category by probably 80% of companies. And that category is "unhireable".
They don't, even if you say you don't require sponsorship and then try to clarify later what you really mean. As I've already mentioned in a previous post, there's a glut of chemists in the US and the competition is immense. If you don't have something unique that sets you apart to bring to the table, then sponsorship or not, you won't get hired. Also I graduated in 2012 when unemployment rate was double what it is today.

Most of the time, those who are willing to hire foreigners ARE the big ones who have tons of experience navigating the immigration system and would certainly have heard of TN.
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Oct 2, 2006
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I just want to point out, that according to USCIS, TN for Canadians is NOT a visa.
Unlike Mexican citizens, Canadian citizens are generally eligible for admission as nonimmigrants without a visa. The TN category, a nonimmigrant classification, simply reflects this general exemption from the visa requirement.
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Oct 6, 2015
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arkane wrote:
Aug 15th, 2019 5:39 pm
I don't really want to have this stupid argument again, but unless you were explicitly told or checked with HR beforehand, do NOT say you DON'T require sponsorship. Any time you require work authorization to legally work in the US, you require sponsorship.
TN doesn't require 'sponsorship' per se, it requires an offer letter and a qualifying occupation including training for such occupation.

"Sponsorship" is a whole different process, and requires the employer spin up a LCA, and commit to quite a significant amount of legal fees unless they already have a program of hiring a lot of people. A process which is risky, with random outcomes, that most employers would prefer to not go through. (yes, the technology sector extensively and prolifically abuses the H-1B visa, but they tend to do so in bulk, and they really aren't interested in Canadians, but are more interested in Indian nationals mostly because they work cheap and undercut wages expected by both Americans and Canadians). Agree with the other poster that the US immigration system is a completely disgraceful cr*p-show that is extensively abused by employers and immigrants alike.

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