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[Canadian Tire] Nike Slingshot 6.0 Golf Set, Men's, Right-Hand - $250

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 4th, 2017 9:35 am
Member
Jun 16, 2012
285 posts
85 upvotes
Toronto. ON
cjam wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 9:52 am
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Agreed. I've never seen the advantage. Who wants a whippy iron? Maybe the pro game.
quite the opposite, the pro's go with stiffer shafts cuz they don't need the whippy shafts to create the distance for them, too much flex would minimize their ball control. They create distance by creating 'lag' in the downswing. is why you see in recent years the advent of graphite shafts in irons for more whip in senior and some womens sets as well. Fact is that most amateurs swings are so slow that they get minimal advantage, with little to no "flex" in their club because they can't create lag in the downswing no matter what club shaft they use.
Deal Addict
Jul 22, 2007
3065 posts
1242 upvotes
Calgary
bam136 wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 7:54 am
I've golfed about 2 times in my life and been to the driving range a few times as well. Is this a good set for a beginner? I'd also require a driver and I'd be set? Suppose I'd need a bag as well.
This is a good deal, quality set. You can find a driver/3 wood for cheap as well. Bags are cheap, sometimes at costco or kijiji.
I love my Koodo account.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 14, 2003
10316 posts
129 upvotes
Mississauga
mikepoppe wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 8:06 am
If you've barely golfed, I recommend just buying a used set on Kijiji to start. Golf clubs in no way make the golfer, so buy a set, you can probably get a whole set with drivers, bag, balls etc for less than this and then if you get into it, then look at buying a better set. Costco regularly has nice sets for a decent price too. The key is to make sure the clubs are the right length for you. Shaft flex is next, but for a beginner doesn't make much difference.
Slightly disagree. If you're a beginner golfer and want to become a regular golfer, it's important that you invest a little bit in getting a set of clubs that will help you. Those aren't Pings or high-end Callies, those are made for experienced golfers and are often difficult to use well if you're below that level. When I started, I had a crappy set of clubs and it was endless frustration; when I bought my current set of Adams golf Redlines, the difference was night and day.

If you're just looking for an inexpensive set, almost any clubs will do. If you're looking to become a golfer, invest. Highly recommend Adams - they have a big sweet spot and are very forgiving. Also, consider buying a Draw driver if you find your drives off the tee tend to slice.
4chan melts your brain.
Member
Jun 16, 2012
285 posts
85 upvotes
Toronto. ON
danfromwaterloo wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 10:44 am
Slightly disagree. If you're a beginner golfer and want to become a regular golfer, it's important that you invest a little bit in getting a set of clubs that will help you. Those aren't Pings or high-end Callies, those are made for experienced golfers and are often difficult to use well if you're below that level. When I started, I had a crappy set of clubs and it was endless frustration; when I bought my current set of Adams golf Redlines, the difference was night and day.

If you're just looking for an inexpensive set, almost any clubs will do. If you're looking to become a golfer, invest. Highly recommend Adams - they have a big sweet spot and are very forgiving. Also, consider buying a Draw driver if you find your drives off the tee tend to slice.
I have to agree and slightly disagree as well lol

As a golfer who has started golfing prior to the meteoric evolution of golf equipment (i started with persimmon woods, and blades, and whatever the shaft flex was, was), IMO there are two paths regarding this discussion.

Easy one first, buy the most forgiving clubs, and play the game. If I started golfing after this golf evolution, I'd of probably taken this path, as most would. By chance, I grew up playing with a set of Northwesterns, Bob Murphy Classics

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/ ... Y/$_35.JPG

they were the most unforgiving clubs, with a small sweet spot. If you mishit it, you'd get a ringing in your hands. Instant feedback, like shock therapy. The trajectory was always low, which made it hard to hold greens if pins were hidden. Thus you learned to open up the face a bit, and improvise. You had more feedback when trying to learn to purposely hit draws and fades, not have the club technology do it for you like today... trust me there were more than everyone's share of mishits with these older clubs. Then came cavity backs, hugely perimeter weighted clubs that reduced the shock in the hands, got the ball up higher, at the cost of feedback and distance control. It was like hitting with a driving iron but with every club. Then thankfully they reduced the cavity, and morphed perimeter weighted clubs with more of a blade feel, which gave you some feedback, but more forgivability.

So the dilemma is do you go for more forgivability, at the expense of feedback, and getting a false sense of really mastering the art of the golf swing? I liken it to doing long math with pencil and paper, than just picking up a calculator.

Just my two cents...
Sr. Member
Oct 23, 2005
503 posts
37 upvotes
Hawkesbury
bam136 wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 7:54 am
I've golfed about 2 times in my life and been to the driving range a few times as well. Is this a good set for a beginner? I'd also require a driver and I'd be set? Suppose I'd need a bag as well.
I would get this instead. Full set of Adams with bag for 50$ more. http://www.canadiantire.ca/fr/pdp/adams ... p.html#srp
Member
Nov 26, 2015
459 posts
208 upvotes
Hamilton, ON
danfromwaterloo wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 10:44 am
Also, consider buying a Draw driver if you find your drives off the tee tend to slice.
Or how about don't buy a driver. Driver gets quite expensive and too many noobs are caught up in hitting just a driver. Even on the driving range, a majority of non regular golfers always hits just a driver. It is one of the hardest clubs to control.

I sometimes don't even play driver since it is my most inconsistent club. I rather lose my woods swing then my irons. Having said this, I can still play a 600 yard par 5 with 3 irons.
Member
Dec 29, 2007
313 posts
89 upvotes
DealyMcCheapskate wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 10:28 am
quite the opposite, the pro's go with stiffer shafts cuz they don't need the whippy shafts to create the distance for them, too much flex would minimize their ball control. They create distance by creating 'lag' in the downswing. is why you see in recent years the advent of graphite shafts in irons for more whip in senior and some womens sets as well. Fact is that most amateurs swings are so slow that they get minimal advantage, with little to no "flex" in their club because they can't create lag in the downswing no matter what club shaft they use.
okay, makes sense. I guess my thought with irons is that they are finesse tools, need more distance, go longer iron. If you need more distance on your low iron, you probably screwed your drive lol. But there are always times or situations where you want to get distance on an iron.
Member
Jun 16, 2012
285 posts
85 upvotes
Toronto. ON
cjam wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 1:40 pm
okay, makes sense. I guess my thought with irons is that they are finesse tools, need more distance, go longer iron. If you need more distance on your low iron, you probably screwed your drive lol. But there are always times or situations where you want to get distance on an iron.
Your guess is right, irons are finesse clubs at times. With pros, getting distance is less of a factor as compared to us hackers, For us yes it would make more sense to go with a longer iron, but with the pros, a longer iron would make it much more difficult to keep the ball on the green once you hit it cuz the lower trajectory and green conditions they play, are wayyyyyy different than ours. Sometimes a lower trajectory on shorter shots is required cuz they hit down on the ball and create lots of backspin.. For higher handicaps who have trouble creating club head speed, and lag in the downswing, they have to look towards technology to create distance and better launch angles. That's what I was getting at concerning your prior post. It was pretty much correct until you mentioned "pros"
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User avatar
Mar 1, 2006
1087 posts
249 upvotes
Edmonton
Picked my set up today. Very nice for the price. Box is a bit non-descript (cardboard), but good looking clubs and hybrid.
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2006
676 posts
118 upvotes
Since Golftown has their Demo sale starting tomorrow, Nov 4... should go check that out first... I've bought some really really good deals for friends before (although this was prior to Golfsmith merger)...
Member
Dec 15, 2006
415 posts
107 upvotes
Ottawa
I bought a used set of Adams irons for $130 a couple weeks ago.

Now Canadian Tire has a complete set on for $299 (down from $499). LINK
So, I bought a set last weekend after waiting a couple days in case a CT GC promo happened (I figured it was due).

Lo and behold CT GC went on sale last Saturday, so Sunday I bought a bunch of GC and decided I want to use some to buy the clubs (change payment method). So, I go to the Carleton Place CT where they have 2 sets in stock (online inventory showed one). Bought them, went to car, got old receipt, brought clubs back inside. Cashier tells me she needs a supervisor's approval since they don't sell the item. I said "What do you mean?" She repeats it. I tell her, "You have a set out on the floor right now!" She eventually processes return which automatically back on my CC.

I likely would have bought these Nikes if they had gone on sale first.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2004
852 posts
66 upvotes
bam136 wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 7:54 am
I've golfed about 2 times in my life and been to the driving range a few times as well. Is this a good set for a beginner? I'd also require a driver and I'd be set? Suppose I'd need a bag as well.
Look on Kijiji or a forum like torontogolfnuts. You can get a set of irons and bag for $150 or less and a driver and 3 wood for $50ish. It won't be the latest and greatest but they'll be good enough to let you play and enjoy the game.

The other place to look is garage sales, although the weather is getting cooler and they aren't as prominent.

Golfers tend to suffer from upgrade-itis so good deals on used gear are easy to find.
Member
Jun 16, 2012
285 posts
85 upvotes
Toronto. ON
Just a note worth posting IMO. I'm not opposed to buying used clubs, but if you do, you should be aware of wear on the club face grooves, mainly on the higher loft clubs which are used more often. Now we may never play enough rounds/year to wear them out, but who knows how many rounds that old retiree you just bought them from has played lol.

Surely you won't notice the difference as much as buying a dull pair of used hockey skates, but as frustrating as the game is, it would suck to not know that the one amazing swing/shot you just hit, could of actually resulted better (or maybe the extra roll out helped you who knows lolol)/

Being the golf nerd that I am, this video is truly amazing, and speaks out to the research and evolution of the game in recent years.

http://www.vokey.com/spin/spin-performance.aspx#

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