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[Canadian Tire] Pizza Stone Lagostina $29.93 YMMV

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  • Feb 20th, 2020 9:49 pm
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Jan 22, 2014
2697 posts
1948 upvotes
Toronto, ON
tatung wrote: What are the benefits over a ceramic/stone?
kenchau wrote: I use a pizza stone myself, but the steel should heat up faster, retain heat better, has easier clean up, perhaps lighter (but this depends on the steel and stone - varies really), won't be prone to cracking. A stone can naturally absorb moisture, but this is seldom an issue from personal experience. But absorbing moisture is also a draw back, for example, when you have sauce or grease spilling onto the stone, it gets absorbed and your stone becomes spotted and such.

I can't speak to whether they heat up to the same temperatures, but assume it's a wash. I assume the steal needs to be seasoned, but have no experience to say one way or another.
The key benefit of steel over stone is heat conductivity - how quickly it moves its stored heat into the dough. The faster the heat transfer the better the oven spring (a quick rise in the dough before it sets) and the nicer the caramelizing on the bottom (tasty toasty brown spots). The thinner the pizza, the hotter you want to bake it and the faster you want to zap it with the stored heat.

Steel is much heavier than stone.

Yes, the steel needs to be seasoned to prevent rust and make it more non-stick, same as iron or steel pans. Brand name pizza steels probably have some level of seasoning that may be all you need, but just as with pans, it's even better if you strip and season it, if you're willing to spend the time and effort. And since it's just steel, if you're OK with a less convenient buying experience to save cost, you can get a sheet of thick steel from a local steel shop, cut to your size, corners rounded; and either have them file the edges down or do it yourself (they can be sharp). You will absolutely need to wash it very well (it will have oil on it that's definitely not food-grade), dry it, and season it if you get it from a shop. Get 1/4" thick minimum; 3/8" is better; 1/2" is technically even better, but very heavy. For sizing, the ideal would be the internal size of your oven minus a 2" gap an all four sides (supposedly for airflow for more even heat distribution).

I'll get a nice steel when I get a bigger oven. For now I have a round stone, and it's great for pizza as well as bread. I just leave it in the oven all the time, and give it a quick cleaning only when cheese overflows a pizza etc. It's not easy to get super clean because it's porous, but it doesn't need to be super clean - it lives in an oven and doesn't need to look new, and is sterilized every time it's used.
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Jan 22, 2014
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dilligafeh wrote: Bro you went all the way out there to get stiffed on toppings ?
Looks like the half price promo at Pizza Hut with the hot air stuffed crust...lol.
Can't compare that level of pizza to Pizza Hut! Look at that photo - that's art. That crust is puffed real bread and nice to eat by itself, those toppings are fresh and real food, and that oven was super hot. I'd bet if you tasted that and compared it to anything from a pizza chain you'd appreciate the difference.
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Jan 22, 2014
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karlb wrote: The baking steel looks like a piece of 1/4 steel to me. Seems like something to pick up at a metal supplier.
ceramic pizza stone? Go to a tile place and buy a large unglazed tile. You will want to avoid glazed tiles as many glazes contain lead.
Or find a stone counter place and get one of their sink cutouts, though the thicker stone will take longer to heat up.

They're not just for pizza, they also apparently help when baking bread.
In general, ceramic withstands high heat. But that does NOT mean a floor tile won't crack in the oven. Maybe give it a try and see how it does. You're right about avoiding glazed tiles.

Countertop stone is also not meant to withstand high heat, but again, might be worth a try. But in that case you should probably make sure it's not a modern engineered stone or any other composite material, because they contain adhesive that wasn't meant for the oven - at the very least find out what's in the stone and look into it for oven use.
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Sep 6, 2002
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OakAged wrote: The key benefit of steel over stone is heat conductivity - how quickly it moves its stored heat into the dough. The faster the heat transfer the better the oven spring (a quick rise in the dough before it sets) and the nicer the caramelizing on the bottom (tasty toasty brown spots). The thinner the pizza, the hotter you want to bake it and the faster you want to zap it with the stored heat.

Steel is much heavier than stone.

Yes, the steel needs to be seasoned to prevent rust and make it more non-stick, same as iron or steel pans. Brand name pizza steels probably have some level of seasoning that may be all you need, but just as with pans, it's even better if you strip and season it, if you're willing to spend the time and effort. And since it's just steel, if you're OK with a less convenient buying experience to save cost, you can get a sheet of thick steel from a local steel shop, cut to your size, corners rounded; and either have them file the edges down or do it yourself (they can be sharp). You will absolutely need to wash it very well (it will have oil on it that's definitely not food-grade), dry it, and season it if you get it from a shop. Get 1/4" thick minimum; 3/8" is better; 1/2" is technically even better, but very heavy. For sizing, the ideal would be the internal size of your oven minus a 2" gap an all four sides (supposedly for airflow for more even heat distribution).

I'll get a nice steel when I get a bigger oven. For now I have a round stone, and it's great for pizza as well as bread. I just leave it in the oven all the time, and give it a quick cleaning only when cheese overflows a pizza etc. It's not easy to get super clean because it's porous, but it doesn't need to be super clean - it lives in an oven and doesn't need to look new, and is sterilized every time it's used.
Sounds like way too much effort considering the usa one might be $80-$100 if shipped and taxes.

Im adding it to my usa shopping list
Did I post something that interests you? Feel free to PM further questions.
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Aug 15, 2015
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ON
OakAged wrote: Can't compare that level of pizza to Pizza Hut! Look at that photo - that's art. That crust is puffed real bread and nice to eat by itself, those toppings are fresh and real food, and that oven was super hot. I'd bet if you tasted that and compared it to anything from a pizza chain you'd appreciate the difference.
Nobody has a sense of humour around here...
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Aug 15, 2015
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jrshopper wrote: Agreed. Simple is better. This is with the steel.
I see you put toppings right up to the edge eh...looking good though.
Jr. Member
Jul 3, 2003
111 posts
31 upvotes
OakAged wrote: In general, ceramic withstands high heat. But that does NOT mean a floor tile won't crack in the oven. Maybe give it a try and see how it does. You're right about avoiding glazed tiles.

Countertop stone is also not meant to withstand high heat, but again, might be worth a try. But in that case you should probably make sure it's not a modern engineered stone or any other composite material, because they contain adhesive that wasn't meant for the oven - at the very least find out what's in the stone and look into it for oven use.
I always found the results from these materials sub-par hence my 2019 summer project:
IMG_20190816_075211_6.jpg
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Apr 11, 2006
7541 posts
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Mississauga
freddie wrote: I always found the results from these materials sub-par hence my 2019 summer project:

IMG_20190816_075211_6.jpg
Nice! Home made brick oven.
Newbie
Sep 5, 2009
65 posts
31 upvotes
Toronto
jrshopper wrote: Good price, but I will never go back from a baking steel now. Although it is 3 times the price with exchange and Canadian shipping charges are high. https://shop.bakingsteel.com/collection ... king-steel
I just checked the price on this and it works out to 156CAD + duties. Must be amazing as I've been using the same pizza stone for 32 years now with amazing results.
Newbie
Feb 17, 2019
62 posts
172 upvotes
400 replies about how people have better shit than the original post. Cooooooool. I grabbed one because I like pizza and 30 bucks is good enough for me to try. The ease of clean up on porcelain is niiiiice.
Sr. Member
Nov 2, 2010
807 posts
164 upvotes
ordered for pick up yasss thank OP
Member
May 12, 2012
294 posts
125 upvotes
ETOBICOKE
karlb wrote: The baking steel looks like a piece of 1/4 steel to me. Seems like something to pick up at a metal supplier.
ceramic pizza stone? Go to a tile place and buy a large unglazed tile. You will want to avoid glazed tiles as many glazes contain lead.
Or find a stone counter place and get one of their sink cutouts, though the thicker stone will take longer to heat up.

They're not just for pizza, they also apparently help when baking bread.

https://kozknowshomes.com/2013/07/diy-baking-steel.html
Member
Feb 16, 2012
279 posts
300 upvotes
Vancouver
Will this pizza stone make a frozen grocery store pizza cook and taste better or is it more for if you make your own pizza with fresh dough?
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Mar 13, 2008
2738 posts
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chrischris84 wrote: I’m really sorry for this unrelated, related post. I’m literally sitting in Italy eating this and just had to show it when I saw this pizza thread. I’m not moving for the next hour lol. Don’t thread cap off my post lol just enjoy the view fellow pizza lovers Thumbs Up Sign
Chris, why are you in Italy alone? Why didn't you invite any of us? Pretty selfish dude. Enjoy your pizza...hope you eat a big size and cho-....*exhales* choose to share more than a photo next time.

Just kidding, btw I've had a ton of pizza in Italy and it's okay...the "real" pizza is in New York or Massachusetts....contrary to popular belief.
-ZdpZ... ;)
Member
Nov 22, 2004
357 posts
127 upvotes
dilligafeh wrote: Nobody has a sense of humour around here...
Nice save! I'll remember this line if I ever need to use it :)

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