Careers

Canceling a job offer acceptance

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 21st, 2010 2:41 pm
Tags:
[OP]
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 8, 2006
826 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto

Canceling a job offer acceptance

Situation: Got a job offer from company A that needs a response within a few days. Had a 2nd interview with company B, and going to be going in for a 3rd one soon.

Solution: Can I just accept offer from company A, and if I do get an offer from company B, can I just cancel the offer from company A? The job is not a contract job, and all it says on the signature form is "I accept your offer of employment."

FYI, I don't mind doing job A, but a job with company B would be better for me.
buffylover wrote:
Apr 6th, 2007 5:44 pm
Akash wrote:
Apr 5th, 2007 5:24 pm
I hate thincrust
im pretty sure thincrust hates you
12 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 9, 2007
2270 posts
96 upvotes
Toronto
if you NEED a job then accept the first offer and continue on with the interview process with company B. If you don't get an offer from B then it's no big deal, if you do then just tell company A that your situation has changed and you can't accept the job offer.

If you ever think you'll end up applying at company A again, this move will ensure that you probably won't be considered in the future.
Newbie
Nov 17, 2010
39 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto
tsat wrote:
Dec 13th, 2010 9:14 am
if you NEED a job then accept the first offer and continue on with the interview process with company B. If you don't get an offer from B then it's no big deal, if you do then just tell company A that your situation has changed and you can't accept the job offer.

If you ever think you'll end up applying at company A again, this move will ensure that you probably won't be considered in the future.

Unless if you are in an industry where everybody knows each other - like actuarial, then there are plenty of bridges to burn. You don't go through your life without burning a few bridges or making a few enemies.
Deal Addict
Dec 26, 2009
1643 posts
407 upvotes
Exas wrote:
Dec 13th, 2010 5:17 am
Situation: Got a job offer from company A that needs a response within a few days. Had a 2nd interview with company B, and going to be going in for a 3rd one soon.

Solution: Can I just accept offer from company A, and if I do get an offer from company B, can I just cancel the offer from company A? The job is not a contract job, and all it says on the signature form is "I accept your offer of employment."

FYI, I don't mind doing job A, but a job with company B would be better for me.

I was in this situation.

I delayed resonding to Company A as long as possible, then accepted right before the deadline (I had an interview scheduled with Company B at this point).

My interview with Company B went really well but I didn't hear back for a while, meanwhile Company A wanted me to choose a start date - I selected the latest date they offered (almost 2 months in the future).

After getting an offer from Company B, I called my would-be manager at Company A and explained the situation (ie that I thought CompanyB would be a better choice for me etc etc). He was understanding and said he could talk to HR to better the offer, I said I didn't think so and that was that. The next day, he called back and offered to increase my vacation time and starting salary. I said sorry but no, he asked me to re-send my offer (after signing the "reject" line) and told me to contact him if things didn't work out with CompanyB.

I SHOULD have then called CompanyB and asked for a better offer but I didn't :( . Anyways, still happily employed by them.

Good luck with your situation :)
Jr. Member
Dec 10, 2005
118 posts
10 upvotes
jeffy10 wrote:
Dec 13th, 2010 1:06 pm
Unless if you are in an industry where everybody knows each other - like actuarial, then there are plenty of bridges to burn. You don't go through your life without burning a few bridges or making a few enemies.

I Agree with this... If you decide to Null your offer with Company A, 3 months down the line, they'll likely have forgotten about the incident. 1 year down the line, they'll be saying "Exas who??".

Also Rubbercheese had a pretty understanding 'would-be-manager' at A... Don't expect your interaction to be that smooth if you nullify your offer.
[OP]
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 8, 2006
826 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto
RubberCheese wrote:
Dec 15th, 2010 12:56 am
I was in this situation.

I delayed resonding to Company A as long as possible, then accepted right before the deadline (I had an interview scheduled with Company B at this point).

My interview with Company B went really well but I didn't hear back for a while, meanwhile Company A wanted me to choose a start date - I selected the latest date they offered (almost 2 months in the future).

After getting an offer from Company B, I called my would-be manager at Company A and explained the situation (ie that I thought CompanyB would be a better choice for me etc etc). He was understanding and said he could talk to HR to better the offer, I said I didn't think so and that was that. The next day, he called back and offered to increase my vacation time and starting salary. I said sorry but no, he asked me to re-send my offer (after signing the "reject" line) and told me to contact him if things didn't work out with CompanyB.

I SHOULD have then called CompanyB and asked for a better offer but I didn't :( . Anyways, still happily employed by them.

Good luck with your situation :)

Alright, I'm going to try and delay signing with company A, thanks guys!
buffylover wrote:
Apr 6th, 2007 5:44 pm
Akash wrote:
Apr 5th, 2007 5:24 pm
I hate thincrust
im pretty sure thincrust hates you
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 7, 2007
5412 posts
378 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Delay your offer as much as possible. You can even let company A know that you have an interview with company B and don't want to sign anything right now. You should also let company B know about A's offer so that they can accelerate your process.

You should never cancel a offer that you have accepted unless absolutely necessary. You are essentially breaking a contract and there might even be legal implications, not to mention the damage to your reputation.
There's a sucker born every minute.
Jr. Member
Dec 10, 2005
118 posts
10 upvotes
number8888 wrote:
Dec 16th, 2010 7:25 pm
Delay your offer as much as possible. You can even let company A know that you have an interview with company B and don't want to sign anything right now. You should also let company B know about A's offer so that they can accelerate your process.

You should never cancel a offer that you have accepted unless absolutely necessary. You are essentially breaking a contract and there might even be legal implications, not to mention the damage to your reputation.

I'm on the fence about this. Generally I would agree, treat your potential employer just as you would want to be treated, but I've been in a situation where my offer was actually rescinded because I took too long to accept the offer and kept on asking for deferrals. Their reasoning was that I had not expressed enough of a passion or interest for the position, and they didn't think I'd be a good fit for it.

In the end, you gotta look out for yourself and your best interests, just as an employer will always be looking out for their best interests. It'd be nice to be able to put all your issues on the table and have an understanding 'would be' employer, but that won't always happen, and you may end up screwing yourself. Just do what you think is right, and if things don't work out, well, what are you gonna do eh?
Jr. Member
Aug 21, 2010
101 posts
3 upvotes
montreal
send the mofos a generic rejection email similar to the one they send their candidates :P
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 29, 2001
4774 posts
38 upvotes
Toronto
jonawesome wrote:
Dec 17th, 2010 4:28 pm
I'm on the fence about this. Generally I would agree, treat your potential employer just as you would want to be treated, but I've been in a situation where my offer was actually rescinded because I took too long to accept the offer and kept on asking for deferrals. Their reasoning was that I had not expressed enough of a passion or interest for the position, and they didn't think I'd be a good fit for it.

In the end, you gotta look out for yourself and your best interests, just as an employer will always be looking out for their best interests. It'd be nice to be able to put all your issues on the table and have an understanding 'would be' employer, but that won't always happen, and you may end up screwing yourself. Just do what you think is right, and if things don't work out, well, what are you gonna do eh?

Same boat a few years back, employer offer a contract position and rescinded at the very last minute.

Didn't find out until days before work start when I call in to inquire about my schedule.

And this is one of Canada big four bank, it shows how much care or lack of for their employee/contractor.

I say, screw them if a better offer is on the table. And also, make sure the start date is only days and not weeks or months away.
Mark77 wrote:
Nov 16th, 2011 9:37 pm
That's not very nice....and you're missing out on a lot of valuable knowledge if you ignore me. Your loss.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 5, 2006
5922 posts
151 upvotes
Murica
tsat wrote:
Dec 13th, 2010 9:14 am
if you NEED a job then accept the first offer and continue on with the interview process with company B. If you don't get an offer from B then it's no big deal, if you do then just tell company A that your situation has changed and you can't accept the job offer.

If you ever think you'll end up applying at company A again, this move will ensure that you probably won't be considered in the future.

this happened to me. Like my app's have ended up in the shredding pool. blacklisted.
Deal Addict
Jun 3, 2009
3122 posts
311 upvotes
Montreal
I had gotten some basic non-paid internship from one of the advisors at company A...2 weeks later while they are doing the background check, I got practically the same offer from a different advisor within the same company.

The problem is that I want to accept the 2nd offer without burning bridges at that company, would this be possible given the fact that I had verbally accepted the 1st offer without signing anything?
Jr. Member
Dec 10, 2005
118 posts
10 upvotes
cn_habs wrote:
Dec 20th, 2010 11:11 pm
I had gotten some basic non-paid internship from one of the advisors at company A...2 weeks later while they are doing the background check, I got practically the same offer from a different advisor within the same company.

The problem is that I want to accept the 2nd offer without burning bridges at that company, would this be possible given the fact that I had verbally accepted the 1st offer without signing anything?
Is the 2nd offer a paid offer? If it is, Tell your potential manager from the first offer this. I highly doubt that he would hold it against you for the 'trouble' you put him through. Paid vs. Unpaid is such a no brainer that I don't think anyone could actually hold it against a candidate for reneging on an acceptance for an unpaid position.

Also generally speaking, there is less of a stigma against employees who move within the same company, and any animosity you may experience will be over the personal trouble you've put the hiring manager/employees through. So if you do go with offer #2, I'm sure the hiring manager from #1 won't be thrilled, but he probably won't feel as 'betrayed' so to speak since you're still with the same company.
× < >

Top