Automotive

Which car would you recommend when towing 2800lbs

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 14th, 2018 2:52 pm
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Mar 23, 2003
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+1 for bmw x5 {pref xdrive 35d - diesel)
Xtrema wrote:
Jun 4th, 2018 6:16 pm
BMW X5 - 6000lbs
2018 Q5 - 4400lbs

2018 Honda Pilot/Ridgeline AWD - 5000lbs

Current gen Pathfinder/QX60 - 6000lbs (now how long your CVT will last is another question)

I don't see any FWD model can exceed 3500lbs.
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Jun 16, 2007
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I would suggest an F-150 with the 2.7 ecoboost. Plenty of power and if I'm easy on skinny pedal I can get 12.6 L/100 km in the city. However that's on the dash readout. My wife's 2012 Honda pilot gets 11.5 on the dash. We used to tow and small 18 foot travel trailer with the pilot but now tow with the truck. I get the same mileage towing with the truck and have better stability, power, braking, utility, and ultimately safety.

My only complaint with a midsize truck is that they cost around the same of a full size and don't get much better mileage than a full size. I looked at a Tacoma briefly but the back seat was not any bigger than my RAV4 at the time. It might have actually been slightly smaller. Kids only get bigger and you'll appreciate the extra space a full size truck can offer. That's my 2 cents, take it for what it's worth.Grinning Face
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Jun 15, 2012
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A guy recently posted identical threads on separate F150 and Tundra forums asking which one to buy if reliability was number one on his list. "Best truck" is subjective, but reliability is Toyota, even the Ford guys conceded that.
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Aug 22, 2011
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AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 10:48 am
A guy recently posted identical threads on separate F150 and Tundra forums asking which one to buy if reliability was number one on his list. "Best truck" is subjective, but reliability is Toyota, even the Ford guys conceded that.
Ford owner here and I concur!
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AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 10:48 am
A guy recently posted identical threads on separate F150 and Tundra forums asking which one to buy if reliability was number one on his list. "Best truck" is subjective, but reliability is Toyota, even the Ford guys conceded that.
vkizzle wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 11:55 am
Ford owner here and I concur!
I heard ford has better fuel economy and overall performance. Pretty much the big american trucks (except for dodge hehe) beat out japanese trucks in everything except reliability.

Is tgat true? Or false?
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 12:14 pm
I heard ford has better fuel economy and overall performance. Pretty much the big american trucks (except for dodge hehe) beat out japanese trucks in everything except reliability.

Is tgat true? Or false?
I own a 2016 Explorer Sport.
Advertised city/highway was 12L/100km, real world driving is 14L/100km!
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I consider myself on the technical side, handyman, and research things to death in terms of RFD value, for reliable ownership I went Tundra. They are probably more American than any other, built in Texas.

I'd only look at the others if I needed a 3/4 or full ton to pull a 5th wheel, which Toyota doesn't make.
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Oct 6, 2010
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lol....ridgeline, lol....

AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 1:04 pm
I consider myself on the technical side, handyman, and research things to death in terms of RFD value, for reliable ownership I went Tundra. They are probably more American than any other, built in Texas.

I'd only look at the others if I needed a 3/4 or full ton to pull a 5th wheel, which Toyota doesn't make.
Cannot be true cause Toyota is Japanese. Side note, my ex-neighbour had a Tundra, older one, was in great shape, traded in for a new one, MY 2016, the redesigned first gen one, nothing but issues. Traded it in, got a Ram and said never again.
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tim-x wrote:
Jun 4th, 2018 5:26 pm
I've never seen a van that tows 5000lbs. The Sienna with a tow package can tow 3500lbs. But if you're pulling a 2800lbs trailer that means that you'll very likely be at or over full capacity with a family and cargo. Not to mention that you shouldn't go over 80% of what the full towing capacity is anyway.

You'll need an SUV that pulls 5k, or just go with a full sized truck. A covered bed will offer more cargo room than the cargo area of a 3 row SUV anyway and offer more utility.
You are correct; I mixed up the numbers in my head; vans definitely top out in the 3500lb range.
I've never towed anything that close (percentage wise) to the vehicles weight, but I have pulled about 1500lbs behind a 3000lb "sporty" car fine.
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koffey wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 1:24 pm
lol....ridgeline, lol....

Cannot be true cause Toyota is Japanese. Side note, my ex-neighbour had a Tundra, older one, was in great shape, traded in for a new one, MY 2016, the redesigned first gen one, nothing but issues. Traded it in, got a Ram and said never again.
Namesake? Sure, American brand is American brand. Percentage content? Tundra is right up there with Ford. Reliability? Tundra is statistically the most reliable even if it’s not for a few people anecdotally.

It really doesn’t matter to me what other people drive. I’m super happy with my choice, it’s the bed I chose (rolls down whole back window lol).

Ya, Ridgeline seems to be the butt of jokes for all truck owners. They’re basically rear scalped Pilots.
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AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 2:40 pm
Namesake? Sure, American brand is American brand. Percentage content? Tundra is right up there with Ford. Reliability? Tundra is statistically the most reliable even if it’s not for a few people anecdotally.

It really doesn’t matter to me what other people drive. I’m super happy with my choice, it’s the bed I chose (rolls down whole back window lol).

Ya, Ridgeline seems to be the butt of jokes for all truck owners. They’re basically rear scalped Pilots.
I don't buy into the reliability aspect of any motor vehicle. This day and age, it's all a gamble. You can't perceive future reliability on the past. 2000 GMT800 series. Replaced only the fuel pump, sending unit, rotors, brakes and 1 wheel bearing. Most reliable. But, I wouldn't randomly believe that any k2xx series is just as reliable.
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Jun 16, 2007
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AncasterRFD wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 1:04 pm
I consider myself on the technical side, handyman, and research things to death in terms of RFD value, for reliable ownership I went Tundra. They are probably more American than any other, built in Texas.

I'd only look at the others if I needed a 3/4 or full ton to pull a 5th wheel, which Toyota doesn't make.
When I was shopping for a truck, the tundra was first in my list coming from a RAV4. The mileage scared me away. What kinda of milage do you get in your tundra?
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sildenafil wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 3:26 pm
When I was shopping for a truck, the tundra was first in my list coming from a RAV4. The mileage scared me away. What kinda of milage do you get in your tundra?
It’s bad, they’re all bad, full size trucks are heavy non-aerodynamic boxes. I drive it to work and back within the city and I tow a few times per year. If you have long commutes and need a daily driver, trucks are not it. I actually don’t know my mileage, I know I use less than half a tank every week. 2016 Tundra introduced the bigger 38 gallon tank (was 26), convenient if you tow long distances. Real world mileage stats will tell you Tundra is probably the worst followed closely by the others. The US Tundra 5.7L guys on the forums report around 15mpg mixed, the other Big 3 trucks with same towing capability will sqeeze out another 1-2mpg. Upgrading to bigger heavier tires will be worse, and look more than it is on screen if the speedo/odo isn’t recalibrated for the larger circumference tire.
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Jun 24, 2006
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When I used to live on the Lake, and commuted to work with a buddy. The weeks we drove my 2002 Sierra SLT with 5.3L, I would spend between $90-$100 for the week. When we drive his 2008 Tundra, he would spend between $150-$160 for the week.

Also consider my commute was 4kms longer than his, per day.
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Nov 8, 2005
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 12:14 pm
I heard ford has better fuel economy and overall performance. Pretty much the big american trucks (except for dodge hehe) beat out japanese trucks in everything except reliability.

Is tgat true? Or false?
I did a lot of research before buying my f150. My general impression was that Ram is the first to put all the new fancy tech in their trucks like air suspension, new infotainment systems etc. but then they're obviously going to have the most bugs to work out. Toyota uses old technology and proven powertrains that have been around forever and so thus fuel economy is lower, and features are generally lacking. You're also paying a premium for 'reliability'. I think Ford is somewhere in the middle. Although their engines are newer and less proven.

I went with the f150 because of its superior fuel mileage and it had the features for the price I wanted to pay. I also own Sienna that we bought as a reliable family vehicle. I liked the Tundra and wanted to buy another Toyota but I couldn't justify spending an extra 10k for really poor fuel economy, cheap interior materials, and fewer features. I may eat my words if my ecoboost is a nightmare.

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