Careers

Careers in demand now and in the future

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 23rd, 2017 1:52 pm
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4714 posts
846 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Trucking. Always work - easily $60-70K+, some 100K+, and many opportunities to start your own business. But it sucks, is hard work, can be dangerous, and definitely not a life sentence- as you can't have a family being away all the time. Have to sleep on a little mattress inside a semi if you are long haul. Also very difficult to stay healthy if you are not a disciplined eater.

Construction. Always work- easily $40-50K+ for a labourer with no skills or experience to start, some 100k+ once you climb the ladder. Hard work though and you are fighting the weather.
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2008
720 posts
110 upvotes
Markham
FirstGear wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 10:01 pm
Trucking. Always work - easily $60-70K+, some 100K+, and many opportunities to start your own business. But it sucks, is hard work, can be dangerous, and definitely not a life sentence- as you can't have a family being away all the time. Have to sleep on a little mattress inside a semi if you are long haul. Also very difficult to stay healthy if you are not a disciplined eater.

Construction. Always work- easily $40-50K+ for a labourer with no skills or experience to start, some 100k+ once you climb the ladder. Hard work though and you are fighting the weather.
These jobs are on its way to being automated over the next 20 years.
[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2013
236 posts
9 upvotes
Oakville
xblackrainbow wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 6:45 pm
Honestly if there's something easy to learn, and pays well. Everybody would jump on that. Unfortunately easy to learn and high paying jobs are outside of major cities.

Find something you like. You seem to be picky about everything.
Thats true that everybody will be doing it.... nah I'm not picky, just concern if I go into something that is not hearing impaired friendly and just stuck working at a bottom feeder job and not get promotions or move up the ladder because of it
hyph3n wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 7:00 pm
Getting a job would be easier if you are a coder but if you really want to earn a lot, its better to have coding as a skill and you should do some other majors.

From my perspective

- Data Science. Its been few decades that clients (end users) have started to use online store, now its high time to make their stored data meaningful. As long as you have data science under your belt, you can do lot better in multiple fields (marketing, finance etc)
- Health Informatics: there will be lot of innovation in health field in near feature, right time to get into it
- Machine Learning/Deep Learning/AI: Everything ... everything will depend on it. It will become more of a commodity and anyone who has more girp on these subjects will be high in demand
Huh! Interesting ... didn't expect coding can be that big of an aspect or factor .. maybe I should get my feet wet and check out some basic coding class or seminar

Interesting career directions based on coding
natalka wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 9:24 pm
Oops, my bad for not reading your first post correctly...

Insurance adjuster/claims
marketing
massage therapist
I have an education in marketing from Sheridan college for their 3 year marketing program like 8 years ago or so... I thought marketing nowadays getting saturated with so many people getting into it
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
9403 posts
1178 upvotes
Toronto
Really,l sounds like an impossibility and not something one would do but shoe cobbler and seamstress type work. If you get proficient at it, and develop a good reputation by doing good work and not seemingly to be a money hungry grub, you can be very successful. The type of immigrants that come that used to bring those skills are no more. Immigrants generally today don't want to get their hands dirty and or are rich so wont' even think about working like that.

That's a true trade, where you'll need to apprentice for awhile. But at the end, it can never be taken away from you and you will always be able to work even in your later years.
Jr. Member
Apr 5, 2017
115 posts
105 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
unowned wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 12:44 am
These jobs are on its way to being automated over the next 20 years.
Assuming the technology is perfect, and it may very well be, but people will put it under intense scrutiny, and resist change as long as possible. It will take till nearly the end of this century the way we're moving along. And that's assuming we don't destroy ourselves before then given the once again rising (even more) tensions in the world.

The take on automated truck(ers) in the movie Logan is pretty well thought out and has plausible accuracy to it with modules that hook up to trailers. But it will take a LONG time for "automation" to take over jobs like this where a physical presence/use of a human is still very much needed (e.g. checking to make sure loads are still secure). But construction? The job security of the labor aspect will always be in demand. The cost for the AI machines and still needing humans around for when things go wrong. Unless they can create a robot as versatile as TARS from Interstellar or a T900 from Terminator.

Even right now, the backlash and scrutiny of self-driving fully autonomous vehicles. Even Uber taking over Taxi's. They can't just go in and change century old established industries or ways of doing things, and expect people to not try and resist it.

I'd like to see my labor job become automated in the foreseeable future. 45-55k a year for me, pretty decent for now while I figure out what I really want to do, I somewhat enjoy the work, time passes by like nothing, hang out with a fun crew, and its helped me with my fitness goals.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 18, 2005
16894 posts
1821 upvotes
GTA West
Salespeople ... if you can sell, you will always be in demand.

Stay away from the financial industry right now unless you really want to be in sales of financial products, and you are confident in your selling ability. There's an oversupply of accounting / banking types in the market right now.

Don't go into engineering / CS unless you are willing to branch out internationally. These people who get engineering degrees and then expect to get a job in Toronto... most of them will be disappointed. I am very fortunate in this respect since I actually do have a real engineering job in my field in Toronto. If you are willing to branch out internationally, you could do well here.

IMO medical / healthcare is where the marketplace is going.
Tradespeople are often overlooked - you can do well as an auto mechanic, and you won't be outsourced to India!
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[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2013
236 posts
9 upvotes
Oakville
tehwegz wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2017 12:30 am
Assuming the technology is perfect, and it may very well be, but people will put it under intense scrutiny, and resist change as long as possible. It will take till nearly the end of this century the way we're moving along. And that's assuming we don't destroy ourselves before then given the once again rising (even more) tensions in the world.

The take on automated truck(ers) in the movie Logan is pretty well thought out and has plausible accuracy to it with modules that hook up to trailers. But it will take a LONG time for "automation" to take over jobs like this where a physical presence/use of a human is still very much needed (e.g. checking to make sure loads are still secure). But construction? The job security of the labor aspect will always be in demand. The cost for the AI machines and still needing humans around for when things go wrong. Unless they can create a robot as versatile as TARS from Interstellar or a T900 from Terminator.

Even right now, the backlash and scrutiny of self-driving fully autonomous vehicles. Even Uber taking over Taxi's. They can't just go in and change century old established industries or ways of doing things, and expect people to not try and resist it.

I'd like to see my labor job become automated in the foreseeable future. 45-55k a year for me, pretty decent for now while I figure out what I really want to do, I somewhat enjoy the work, time passes by like nothing, hang out with a fun crew, and its helped me with my fitness goals.
valid points... getting the true automation to take over will take a long time to happen...I assumed based on your labour job... doing construction? ... I would like to make 45-55k myself lol

I'm currently making $16/hr or 30k (2016) plus maybe 3k in tips as a pastry chef at restaurant in Oakville, it a dead end job, no advancement... I have an education in marketing from sheridan college like 9 years ago and culinary education from humber college for 1 year afterward. My plan was to open a pastry shop but from working at my current job kinda kill the passion to do it and top of that... huge money for startup which is probably like 100k, workload, start super early, holidays/weekends are gone, managing and dealing with other things kind of took it toll on me to not do it.

Jucius Maximus wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2017 8:29 pm
Salespeople ... if you can sell, you will always be in demand.

Stay away from the financial industry right now unless you really want to be in sales of financial products, and you are confident in your selling ability. There's an oversupply of accounting / banking types in the market right now.

Don't go into engineering / CS unless you are willing to branch out internationally. These people who get engineering degrees and then expect to get a job in Toronto... most of them will be disappointed. I am very fortunate in this respect since I actually do have a real engineering job in my field in Toronto. If you are willing to branch out internationally, you could do well here.

IMO medical / healthcare is where the marketplace is going.
Tradespeople are often overlooked - you can do well as an auto mechanic, and you won't be outsourced to India!
I can't sell since I'm hearing impaired (wear hearing aids) .... it will be difficult to communicate with different people with accents, tones, volumes, etc

I can't do medical/healthcare... I don't have the stomach to handle that ... one time I got light-headed when I saw blood in the tubes moving in the hospital, passed out and fell backward and hit the wall with my head which made a hole in the wall haha

another option is open a different business with 60k cash I currently have ... but the question is... what kind of businesses are feasible in this day and age where most things can be bought online... hell! look at walmart closing stores with the lack of sales... I never thought to see the day a titan like walmart crumbling down a bit
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 18, 2005
16894 posts
1821 upvotes
GTA West
toshibaaa wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2017 9:22 pm
I can't do medical/healthcare... I don't have the stomach to handle that ... one time I got light-headed when I saw blood in the tubes moving in the hospital, passed out and fell backward and hit the wall with my head which made a hole in the wall haha
You must realise that not all medical / healthcare jobs involve the possibility of seeing blood.
I used to work for a biotech company whose purpose was to develop software that analyzed images of cell cultures. All you see is cells under a microscope.
I did some software development contracting work for another company whose work was more in the gynecology department. (No off-colour jokes please, let's keep this thread open.)
There are MANY branches of medical technology jobs and only a small portion of them will have any possibility of letting you see blood.
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Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Apr 16, 2006
5880 posts
329 upvotes
Anything to do with death or taxes. There's always work in these areas.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
9403 posts
1178 upvotes
Toronto
FirstGear wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 10:01 pm
Trucking. Always work - easily $60-70K+, some 100K+, and many opportunities to start your own business. But it sucks, is hard work, can be dangerous, and definitely not a life sentence- as you can't have a family being away all the time. Have to sleep on a little mattress inside a semi if you are long haul. Also very difficult to stay healthy if you are not a disciplined eater.

Construction. Always work- easily $40-50K+ for a labourer with no skills or experience to start, some 100k+ once you climb the ladder. Hard work though and you are fighting the weather.
Apparently there's alot of low level, low skilled workers taking over. Basically standards have gone way down and the people willing to take a pay check as well.
Penalty Box
Dec 2, 2007
812 posts
86 upvotes
Toronto
the job market in Canada has gone down the toilet.
people can't find jobs including engineers, teachers, IT professionals, accountants, CNC machinists.
something is really F*** in this country for sure.
Newbie
Jan 8, 2015
47 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto, ON
natalka wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 5:59 am
My niece just started her career as a repiratory therapist - very high in demand, as is anything else respiratory related.

Anything dealing with the elderly/gerontology - from social work, occupational therapy, etc.
Unfortunately, this is absolutely not true. I have friends in the respiratory therapy program that graduated last year and this year from Michener Institute and Fanshawe College and they cannot find work including many of their classmates. This holds true if you wish to move out of Ontario and go east or west for for Ontario, it is very heavily saturated. Many of their peers are only part-time or casual and the health field care is not as lucrative as it once was. Because of this, many private clinics are now lowering wages and salaries because they know that there is an oversupply of the market and they can pay however they wish.
Last edited by Sequanium on Apr 23rd, 2017 11:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Oct 26, 2003
26805 posts
1666 upvotes
Winnipeg
picard12 wrote:
Apr 23rd, 2017 11:12 am
the job market in Canada has gone down the toilet.
people can't find jobs including engineers, teachers, IT professionals, accountants, CNC machinists.
something is really F*** in this country for sure.
times are changing, you have to change with it
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Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4714 posts
846 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
at1212b wrote:
Apr 23rd, 2017 2:05 am
Apparently there's alot of low level, low skilled workers taking over. Basically standards have gone way down and the people willing to take a pay check as well.
Yes. The East Indian truckers fit that stereotype for highway work. For natural resources related work they recruit non-local workers from other provinces for cheaper who don't know what they are worth and are more desperate for work.

That happened to a lot of fields too. You have call centers and lots of software engineering that is outsourced now. Previously "accounting" positions now replaced with cheaper data entry clerks.
unowned wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 12:44 am
These jobs are on its way to being automated over the next 20 years.
At this time of writing, if you're looking to work as a trucker over the next 20 years, you're doing it wrong. You cannot sustain that lifestyle happily anyhow. You hit an income ceiling pretty quickly (often within 5 years, sometimes less). The key is to gain experience and raise investment capital quickly.

Many industries are cyclical. Look what happened to oil, engineering, and finance.
Last edited by FirstGear on Apr 23rd, 2017 12:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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