Careers

Careers or professional jobs where there is actual demand

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  • Apr 7th, 2012 3:32 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 9, 2008
739 posts
86 upvotes
Winnipeg

Careers or professional jobs where there is actual demand

So I know there has been a lot of threads on this topic...but no good or supported answers on this topic at all.

When I say actual demand, I mean jobs where it is relatively easy finding work and if you were to lose your job, it would be rather easy finding another job in that same sort of category getting compensated similarly.

Government employees don't fit in this category for instance: if any public service worker lost their job, chances are they'd have nowhere to go and would probably need to go on EI / go back to school to get anywhere close to the pay scale they were at before.

So with that in mind, what is there out there really? Doctors/Dentists have it pretty good, but not everyone can get into that kind of career. What else? Nurses? Lawyers?
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Jun 20, 2010
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This question doesn't have a solid answer, and for sure you shouldn't be taking the stuff you read on this forum (or any forum) as an indication of what the demand is like in the real world.

On this forum you mostly have complaints from entry level recent graduates. I don't think there is really a huge demand for these people in any profession. There are many more graduates these days in all fields than positions available for them.

When you start talking about experienced people, this is where the variability comes in. If you're an all star programmer who knows 10+ languages and can churn out 1000+ lines of code a day while the average guys can only do 50, you will most likely be in demand regardless if your company goes belly up and has to lay you off. If you have specific skills in a niche market (say traffic signal design or something, where you'll find only like 5 or so people at an engineering company doing this) and you have 15+ years experience, you will also probably have a lot of mobility. If you're just a paper pusher with no real skill set or aren't at the top of your field, you will probably be having a harder time.

You mention healthcare a lot on these forums, well guess what entry level nurses/technologists from those michener programs you love also have a hard time getting their feet in the door. On the other hand if you have 10+ years of experience as one of these techs you will probably have much less if any trouble finding someone who will take you.
Member
Feb 18, 2012
452 posts
61 upvotes
Toronto
Accountants definitely don't have problem finding jobs. Whether you are an undergraduate looking for entry level job or an accomplished professional looking for senior accounting job, jobs are available and plenty. You can even set up your own practice and do consulting work. The hard part always comes down to actually securing those jobs and clients, but I guess it's same for everything in life.
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Mar 27, 2011
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Big hell no to lawyers. Law school is becoming a fall back the way teacher's college is to a lot of people.
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Mar 28, 2010
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I see phamra / healthcare booming
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Jan 14, 2006
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No to nursing. Hiring freeze. No jobs. May graduate this year from nursing jobless.
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mtmp5k wrote:
Feb 25th, 2012 8:03 pm
I see phamra / healthcare booming
Not pharma. Plenty of full-time permanent pharmacy jobs is a thing of the past.
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May 18, 2009
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Applecart wrote:
Feb 25th, 2012 5:52 pm
Accountants definitely don't have problem finding jobs. Whether you are an undergraduate looking for entry level job or an accomplished professional looking for senior accounting job, jobs are available and plenty. You can even set up your own practice and do consulting work. The hard part always comes down to actually securing those jobs and clients, but I guess it's same for everything in life.

I wish people would stop telling our impressionable youth that Accountants have no trouble finding jobs. It's pretty over-saturated, I think half my graduating class is still unemployed.
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if it was easy to get a job in some field, don't you think people would have already pounced on the opportunity?
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Aug 24, 2011
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kasianman wrote:
Feb 26th, 2012 7:46 am
No to nursing. Hiring freeze. No jobs. May graduate this year from nursing jobless.
WoW. In my parts nurses are in demand, and with the aging population I always figured it was a sure bet...go figure
thegradas wrote:
Feb 28th, 2012 10:54 pm
Not pharma. Plenty of full-time permanent pharmacy jobs is a thing of the past.
What about a lab tech? or something in the bio industry? I have a hard time believing Pharma has a down side.

To answer the OP question Stone Mason for the win Jim

Cross country shortage of this high paying trade. You work only on nice days and are guaranteed possible if not permanent injuries after 10 years. Seriously, if you are young and mechanically orientated, go trades. Automechanic, Industrial Mech, Electromech. Though not always in demand these jobs give you the freedom of jumping around other trades if need be. I am a TQ mechanic but I don't have much problem finding work in the (any) service industry, from repairing dishwashers to home heating systems because of my "mechanical abilities". Most every jobs have highs and lows, even accountants in the early 90s had a tough time, so its hard to tell whats a sure bet. In all my working life, my experience have been that every trade or career goes through a slow period its how fast you can adapt and do something completely different that will set you aside from others. I always suggest to youngsters is to get as much education as possible before going trades in case you need a change in the future.

Tough question,
Regards
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Jul 11, 2010
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Accounting, Nursing, Pharmacy. Basically anything that'll help the baby boomers when they retire.
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NutsandBolts wrote:
Feb 29th, 2012 9:25 am
WoW. In my parts nurses are in demand, and with the aging population I always figured it was a sure bet...go figure


What about a lab tech? or something in the bio industry? I have a hard time believing Pharma has a down side.

To answer the OP question Stone Mason for the win Jim

There's always casual nursing work, A lot of people just don't like the hours and schedule. My friend had no trouble finding that and filling 40 hours before he got his permanent job. He's now in a nursing related office job and still picks up hospital shifts. If he wanted to get back into hospital work he would have no trouble at least getting 40 hours in while he looked for a regular spot.

NO NO NO to lab tech and anything to do with the bio industry. It's boom and bust for even the most successful companies and they pay crap to anyone lower than a Phd. The only decent jobs are in government which is at risk right now, and science in government is unstable at the best of times.

See the post a few months back about pharma companies offering new grads 20k jobs because they can, and even Phd people trying to get them.
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Nov 26, 2007
767 posts
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London
As with anything, it is not only demand dependent, but also regionally dependent.

Are there jobs for doctors? Sure - but it depends heavily on what you specialize in (Family medicine vs. Orthopedic surgery), and also WHERE you want to work. Want to work in downtown TO? Unlikely, for any specialty. Want to work as a family doctor in a rural community? Many will be begging for you. Same applies to nursing, only in an urban/rural hospital setting instead of community levels.
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Aug 24, 2011
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Rhaegar wrote:
Feb 29th, 2012 10:15 am
There's always casual nursing work, A lot of people just don't like the hours and schedule. My friend had no trouble finding that and filling 40 hours before he got his permanent job. He's now in a nursing related office job and still picks up hospital shifts. If he wanted to get back into hospital work he would have no trouble at least getting 40 hours in while he looked for a regular spot.

NO NO NO to lab tech and anything to do with the bio industry. It's boom and bust for even the most successful companies and they pay crap to anyone lower than a Phd. The only decent jobs are in government which is at risk right now, and science in government is unstable at the best of times.

See the post a few months back about pharma companies offering new grads 20k jobs because they can, and even Phd people trying to get them.

Thanks for writing back
Its true I did see some pharma co offering 3 year college grads $12 to $14 an hour.....I would never do that kind of schooling for that kind of pay. Go figure :?:

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