Pets

Which cat food do you guys recommend for cat?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 25th, 2018 12:39 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 24, 2018
157 posts
33 upvotes

Which cat food do you guys recommend for cat?

Hi i just wanna get your opinions on the cat foods out there.

my cats about 14 months. I want to get opinions on cat foods as theres so many different ones and some are a lot more expensive then others.
42 replies
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2012
13372 posts
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Toronto
My main strict rule is, the label doesn't lie.
If two brands have a very similar ingredient list I'd buy the cheaper of the two.
If you're okay with "Chicken meal" being the first ingredient, then PC "Nutrition first" kitten food is a good choice: https://www.presidentschoice.ca/en_CA/p ... 10363.html
IF not, then read the label carefully and DO keep the first ingredient on mind...
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May 9, 2006
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Give this thread a read through... it's a bit dated, but it'll give you a better understanding of brands. http://forums.redflagdeals.com/quality- ... ly-905185/

Also check out this website: https://catinfo.org/ It'll give you a lot of information on proper cat nutrition.

One last tip. Don't listen to vets. Veterinary schools only have 1-2 courses on pet nutrition and often it's optional. On top of that, pet food brands hand out scholarships, promote heavily on campus and give big incentives to vets for selling and promoting their products. Basically they are brainwashing vets from day 1 that their products are superior yet actually are no better than low end. Here's an analogy. Would you trust a doctor's nutrition advice who when through school on a scholarship from Pepsi and was paid by Pepsi to sell their products in his office? That's exactly what's happening... except replace doctor with vet and Pepsi with Colgate Palmolive.
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Jun 22, 2007
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Been using Purina One Indoor dry for years. Friskies wet as a treat. Purine One has a near perfect rating and my cat enjoyed it from day one. Wet food was trial and error with brands and flavors.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
847 posts
382 upvotes
British Columbia
joeyjoejoe wrote:
Jun 8th, 2018 8:45 am
give big incentives to vets for selling and promoting their products. Basically they are brainwashing vets from day 1 that their products are superior yet actually are no better than low end.
You make it sound like some huge conspiracy where vets are out to get you. Sheesh. Vets get no incentives for promoting these products and more often than not their own pets are on the foods. They see results on the foods and recommend them because there are studies backing their efficacy. They can't back a product that has no research behind it and moreover may have no quality control at their processing plants. If you care to enlighten me on what these incentives are that you speak of that would be fantastic because I work closely with multiple vets and know a fair bit about the business pricing structure and have not heard of such a thing. Also, food has a very low markup considering how much space it takes up in the clinic. The food simply is not cheap even at cost.

A couple months back one vet was confronted with coments such as yours and was very upset when she came back after the appointment. Don't believe everything you read online. Vets are people too and they love animals. It would not be a very rewarding career otherwise. They're trying to help your pets. If you get good results on other brands of food then that's fine. Every animal is different.

To answer the OP, as I said every animal is different. I recommend feeding wet food over dry food no matter the quality. Besides that just find something that works within your budget. I personally believe genetics play a far more important role than food quality; I have had several cats that made it to 17-20+ on "low end" brands.
Member
Jan 18, 2017
338 posts
103 upvotes
I transitioned my cat into raw after a couple months, but if you're not comfortable with raw I'd look at Petcurean Now and Go. I think you can get free samples. Definitely look for grain free and feed wet food at least once a day. Cats are desert animals and don't drink water naturally, they get their water from the prey they hunt. Dry food ... no water.
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May 9, 2006
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Karala wrote:
Jun 8th, 2018 11:43 am
You make it sound like some huge conspiracy where vets are out to get you. Sheesh. Vets get no incentives for promoting these products and more often than not their own pets are on the foods. They see results on the foods and recommend them because there are studies backing their efficacy. They can't back a product that has no research behind it and moreover may have no quality control at their processing plants. If you care to enlighten me on what these incentives are that you speak of that would be fantastic because I work closely with multiple vets and know a fair bit about the business pricing structure and have not heard of such a thing. Also, food has a very low markup considering how much space it takes up in the clinic. The food simply is not cheap even at cost.

A couple months back one vet was confronted with coments such as yours and was very upset when she came back after the appointment. Don't believe everything you read online. Vets are people too and they love animals. It would not be a very rewarding career otherwise. They're trying to help your pets. If you get good results on other brands of food then that's fine. Every animal is different.

To answer the OP, as I said every animal is different. I recommend feeding wet food over dry food no matter the quality. Besides that just find something that works within your budget. I personally believe genetics play a far more important role than food quality; I have had several cats that made it to 17-20+ on "low end" brands.
First of all, don't put words in my mouth. I never said vets are out to get anyone. I just said they are misinformed and brainwashed by big corporations.

Second, I didn't say or promote the idea of confronting your vet. I just said don't listen to them when it comes to food. Also why don't you ask your vets about the incentives with sales volumes/targets. Or added incentives to push whatever new product that company wants to sell? Or if they sell competing brands, if they ever went to an "education seminar"... at a vacation resort? Typically the incentives are paid to the vet and not the clinic. Think of it like commission. Maybe the vets you know just sell the products and not into the incentives or maybe they aren't telling you the whole story. Whatever the case, incentives do exist.

Third, the link I provided wasn't written by some vegan, hippie, online social justice warrior... it was written by a vet! A vet who saw the lack of nutrition knowledge within her field and chose to specialize in it. If you bothered to read the link, you would see that she has a similar stance (and basically what you did). Wet over dry, buy whatever best fits your budget and don't listen to vets.

Finally, I didn't recommend any brand over another or how much to spend. The only thing I said was to not buy the food the vets sell. For example, one of the popular brands is Hills. They use big words like "science" and "prescription" to make their products look good. They'll spout out all sorts of studies which were completely funded by themselves. There's all sorts of inherent bias with that.

So what makes Hills bad? Read what's on the label. Generally speaking (as various sub products will have varying ingredients), but Hill's cat food main ingredient is rice. Big red flag! Cats don't eat grains and cats don't need grains. They won't die from it, but it's not needed in the diet of obligate carnivores. Second ingredient is chicken by-product meal. Now many will say that when ever you see "meal" instead of meat, to stay away, but that's not entirely true. The creation of "meal" is taking meat and making a stew, but boiling it down to a concentrate. This reduces water, but what's left over is very high in protein. The problem is you can do that with anything like meat, bones, worn shoes, etc. So how do you tell bad meal from good meal? Generally, if it says something like "chicken meal" or "beef meal" is fine. When they start stating other things like "by-product" or "bone" or "animal" (as in they don't even state the animal), you should be concerned. Third ingredient is corn by-product. More carbs that cats don't need. Then there are ingredients like artificial flavors and color as none of the top 3 have any. The ingredients aren't any better than the low end brands, except they cost significantly more. In most cases even more than top tier brands. Nobody should ever spend that much for inferior food.

The real evil are the food companies that try to pass their low end food as high end and get the vets to do their dirty work. So educating yourself is the best solution. Read up on the brands out there. Read up on nutrition, then make the best choice for you and your cat... as they'll have the final say on what tastes good and what doesn't. Comments like "I have had several cats that made it to 17-20+ on "low end" brands." are irresponsible. There are some cheap dollar store no name wet food brands out there that are high in fats and carbs which for the long term of your cat is like eating McDonald's every day. It doesn't matter what your genetics are.
Deal Addict
May 22, 2003
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Hi guys, my wife and I are about to adopt a cat and we're trying to figure out which wet cat food to buy. Originally was going to go for Wellness cat food, but seems like a lot of people are recommending Petcurean.
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Aug 2, 2003
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notenoughsleep wrote:
Jun 15th, 2018 6:11 pm
Hi guys, my wife and I are about to adopt a cat and we're trying to figure out which wet cat food to buy. Originally was going to go for Wellness cat food, but seems like a lot of people are recommending Petcurean.
I'd recommend Wellness for the grain-free canned food It's a good value for a premium food when you factor in the coupons you get from the Wellness site by signing up for the newsletter. You can sign up more than once and each sign up gets you a coupon typically monthly for $3 off any food purchase. You can print twice, so every e-mail address adds to that. It can save you quite a bit. Also, Wellness cat food has larger cans, which many cat foods don't. The smaller the can, the less the value. It depends on the cat of course. Some will eat anything and some are into that "fresh can" taste and texture (an oxymoron, I know).

I'm ultimately of the opinion that raw is best. But that doesn't suit everyone and some cats will never eat raw no matter what you do.
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Deal Addict
May 22, 2003
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So VOKRA has suggested we keep the cat on the same food for the first month to avoid diarrhea, so we're keeping her on Firstmate for now before switching to wellness. Do cats like to stick with the same flavour or do they like variety? We're picking her up on Thursday :)
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notenoughsleep wrote:
Jun 24th, 2018 11:52 pm
So VOKRA has suggested we keep the cat on the same food for the first month to avoid diarrhea, so we're keeping her on Firstmate for now before switching to wellness. Do cats like to stick with the same flavour or do they like variety? We're picking her up on Thursday :)
Are you feeding the grain-free wet food of First Mate? I think that's quite a good food, at least in my experience. I recall phoning them at some point (I don't recall why) and spoke to a guy there who was in charge of manufacturing or marketing or something. He was super-proud of their cat foods and said they worked very hard on the formulation. It was all very impressive. And relatively local to us in B.C. :-) We bought the turkey grain-free wet food and my first reaction was that it smelled *exactly* like you'd expect turkey to smell. That's not always the case with cat foods, for whatever reason. But unfortunately, one of our cats is very picky and she simply didn't like it, no matter which flavour we tried. So we went back to Wellness. She also will eat the wet food from Bosley's, Performatrin, if you haven't tried that. But not First Mate. Anyway, if your cats like it, why switch for now?
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Newbie
Sep 8, 2015
40 posts
3 upvotes
I mix these 2
science diet dental
science diet hairball

no more dental or hairball issues.

Nutro is another good brand.
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captnoon4545 wrote:
Jun 30th, 2018 4:52 pm
I mix these 2
science diet dental
science diet hairball

no more dental or hairball issues.

Nutro is another good brand.
FWIW, Nutro has a few OK grain free varieties, but Science Diet is chock full of things cats don't need, like grains. Cats simply don't need them at all. Science Diet is expensive too relatively speaking, considering all the filler.

At some point, most cats need their teeth brushed, even with a dental-specific food. Something way less expensive than Science Diet that also helps in that same way with dental issues is to chop up some raw chicken or turkey in small pieces. Not tiny, but small. The meat and bone. Necks are great for this. Our cat gets about 30 grams per night. Raw meat is good for cats, but you shouldn't feed just exclusively raw meat as it's not a balanced diet, although a balanced raw food is *really* good for cats and their teeth.

Your hairball issues can also be helped by brushing of course, but also if you add some kind of oily thing to your cat's food that helps too. For example, we add a few drops of grapeseed oil to each of our cat's food each night. A bit of ghee or another oil will also fulfill that function. And raw egg yolk (for the lecithin) mixed in the food can also help. You can purchase egg yolk lecithin at most stores that sell supplements if you don't want to deal with raw egg yolks.

You can't really argue with genetics as a factor though and your cat can have a perfectly happy life on Science Diet and I hope he/she does. I'm just saying there are healthier alternatives you could consider.
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