Fashion & Beauty

CBC Marketplace episode on what happens to ur clothing donations

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  • Feb 12th, 2018 6:25 am
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Mar 14, 2005
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CBC Marketplace episode on what happens to ur clothing donations

"Fast fashion is a major contributor to the world's clothing waste problem. Many of us give our old clothes to charity or drop them in a store take-back bin, but you might be surprised to learn most of it is sold and can end up in the landfill."

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Mar 23, 2011
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If you are looking for more info on this, look up the movie "The True Cost"
Alex
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May 14, 2009
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While I'll never dump old clothes in one of those community donation bins, I once did give some to H&M for a $5 coupon off something I was going to buy anyway.

I prefer to either sell stuff to a second hand clothing store, donate certain items to the Out of the Cold program (they give it directly to people and don't resell it or toss it), or donate to a second hand clothing store that attracts lower income shoppers (non VV but one of those that might target low income women trying to enter the workplace, for example).

Interesting about the program in Markham- I'll read more about that.
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Feb 17, 2007
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Quality > Quantity
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Oct 3, 2006
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Reminds of of how my aunt donated her old clothes to Value Village only to buy it back from them a while later Face With Tears Of Joy
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Oct 6, 2015
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Easy solution. Stop buying. More saving. Buy only the stuff you need.
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Aug 15, 2015
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Markham, ON
Give your used clothing back to yourself. It's a great motivation for you to grow bigger or smaller. Also, donate your used clothings to others only when you have truly wore out your clothings. People are too busy sitting by the computer all day and not putting any wear or tear on their bought clothings.

The poorly made clothes will rip so fast if you wear them. Who would buy clothes that have been ripped in half?
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Aug 15, 2015
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As I was looking at the remains of the burnt textile, I just thought maybe they are preparing to improve their roads and burning textiles to use as pavement? You have to burn some garbage first and then turn it into stuff that can be durable enough to be pavement right?

I am no garbage man or construction worker so I don't know. I am just guessing LOL
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May 14, 2009
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Poppwl wrote:
Jan 30th, 2018 10:26 am
Give your used clothing back to yourself. It's a great motivation for you to grow bigger or smaller. Also, donate your used clothings to others only when you have truly wore out your clothings. People are too busy sitting by the computer all day and not putting any wear or tear on their bought clothings.

The poorly made clothes will rip so fast if you wear them. Who would buy clothes that have been ripped in half?
What? If I want to get bigger on purpose, why would I give my used (too small) clothing back to myself?
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Jun 1, 2006
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Poppwl wrote:
Jan 30th, 2018 10:26 am
Give your used clothing back to yourself. It's a great motivation for you to grow bigger or smaller.
Image
I swear to drunk I'm not God 😝
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Oct 23, 2017
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GTA West
You really feel pretty guilty seeing this. In the first place, people (and children) who make this stuff in poor countries are exploited to make this stuff in sweatshop conditions, and then we ship it off to other poor countries a couple of years later to pollute their environment.

This was a pretty shocking documentary, stating that the supply of donated textiles vastly exceeds the number of needy recipients who can use it. I think they said that 95% of clothes given to charity here are shipped overseas in big bales that are stacked up for sale in markets, but most of it ends up being discarded and burned there.

Some African countries want to ban all used clothing from entering the country since most of it ends up as garbage. It also discourages local garment industries in those countries.

It seems that recycling is not feasible since most clothing has mixed synthetic/natural content that cannot readily be separated, and any fibre they can get is very poor quality.
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Oct 1, 2011
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^ Yes, it is shocking and disgusting. I don't have high clothing turnover myself but the documentary made me more acutely aware of what I have wasted anyway.

I am going to be far more conscious of not buying too many more cute low-quality crap, or uncomfortable/trendy things I wear once/twice then never wear again. And no more high heels...just low heels or flats from now on, as the high heels fall into the "wear once or twice" category.
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peanutz wrote:
Feb 12th, 2018 12:44 am
^ Yes, it is shocking and disgusting. I don't have high clothing turnover myself but the documentary made me more acutely aware of what I have wasted anyway.

I am going to be far more conscious of not buying too many more cute low-quality crap, or uncomfortable/trendy things I wear once/twice then never wear again. And no more high heels...just low heels or flats from now on, as the high heels fall into the "wear once or twice" category.
There is a place for low quality clothes. You can use it as undershirt or clothes intended to break, could be a performance costume.

You think about what you want to wear carefully.

Some high heels are actually very comfortable. Buy what's right for you in terms of wear and price. If you cannot afford, too bad. If you missed a sale or promotion. Too bad.

You probably have more than enough clothes.

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