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Change of career to be a recruiter

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 25th, 2019 12:15 pm
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8262 posts
525 upvotes

Change of career to be a recruiter

I am thinking to have a career change after spending decades working for stable and good pension jobs that I don't enjoy at all. Since my background and whole life have been working in the accounting/finance field, I am thinking being a recruiter for accounting/finance professional could be a good move for me especially I like working with people than numbers. I know it might not be easy as I thought. But at least this idea gets me more excited than finding another job that I will end up with another dead end job I hate.

I wonder how/where I can start with this move e.g. contact different big agencies and see if they are hiring ?

Also, I understand the pay will not be as stable as a regular office job. But would like know if the pay structure is similar from different firms e.g. base pay with commisions.

BTW, I understand some recruitment firms e.g. Robert Half, have a team that deal with the clients (hiring companies) and another team deal with candidates. Is it common for most recruitment firms ? Do I have to pick which ones I should pursue first ? Or should I go for recruitment positions that do both sides ?

Thanks in advance for sharing any information you know.
13 replies
Deal Fanatic
May 18, 2009
5483 posts
1132 upvotes
Richmond Hill
You might want to consider a post-grad cert in HRM as recruitment is a stream of HR.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2893 posts
646 upvotes
Former agency recruiter here

Some firms, the recruiter runs a 360 desk which means you do everything. Bring in sales, fill the jobs. You pocket much more commission, about half goes back to company.

Some firms you will have sourcers/recruiters to help fill your jobs, and you focus on bringing in sales. You cut commission to them, however some say this way you can bring in more sales since not every lead will result in a close. You bring in 10 job orders but you might only close 2.

If you're really fancy and top of your game, you would be running retained search where clients pay upfront...regardless if you fill the job or not. Retained is higher pressure IMHO because your reputation is on the line. I've worked retained for a bit, even though I filled everything i was given....i actually hated it. You need to be very client-centric to be successful, since they already paid and have high expectations.

Do you need HR education? Not really, it helps but not as much as you think it would.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 16, 2015
1678 posts
1131 upvotes
Canada
Sounds like a good role to automate...
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8262 posts
525 upvotes
bhrm wrote:
Sep 23rd, 2019 10:32 pm
Former agency recruiter here

Some firms, the recruiter runs a 360 desk which means you do everything. Bring in sales, fill the jobs. You pocket much more commission, about half goes back to company.

Some firms you will have sourcers/recruiters to help fill your jobs, and you focus on bringing in sales. You cut commission to them, however some say this way you can bring in more sales since not every lead will result in a close. You bring in 10 job orders but you might only close 2.

If you're really fancy and top of your game, you would be running retained search where clients pay upfront...regardless if you fill the job or not. Retained is higher pressure IMHO because your reputation is on the line. I've worked retained for a bit, even though I filled everything i was given....i actually hated it. You need to be very client-centric to be successful, since they already paid and have high expectations.

Do you need HR education? Not really, it helps but not as much as you think it would.
Thanks a lot for sharing.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2893 posts
646 upvotes
Redsanta wrote:
Sep 24th, 2019 12:45 am
Sounds like a good role to automate...
Many have tried but have you ever had experience dealing with humans? They're seriously unreliable, unpredictable, and they typically have an opinion of their own.

Instead of automating the recruitment process, I say we just go straight to hiring robots. You know what you're getting and you can always take it back to the store if something goes wrong.

/s
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8262 posts
525 upvotes
Thanks very much for sharing the information and experience.

As a beginner and change of career, which firm should I start with ? I have heard some colleagues joined Robert Half and Mason, but didn't get a chance to ask their details.

Should I start with big firms with more support (i.e. larger clients & candidates database) and a base salary ?

I guess it will be a big change and will take some time to adjust and adapt the mentality from a job with regular pay and standard benefits to like commission base and/or self employed type of work relationship.

Thanks again.
bhrm wrote:
Sep 23rd, 2019 10:32 pm
Former agency recruiter here

Some firms, the recruiter runs a 360 desk which means you do everything. Bring in sales, fill the jobs. You pocket much more commission, about half goes back to company.

Some firms you will have sourcers/recruiters to help fill your jobs, and you focus on bringing in sales. You cut commission to them, however some say this way you can bring in more sales since not every lead will result in a close. You bring in 10 job orders but you might only close 2.

If you're really fancy and top of your game, you would be running retained search where clients pay upfront...regardless if you fill the job or not. Retained is higher pressure IMHO because your reputation is on the line. I've worked retained for a bit, even though I filled everything i was given....i actually hated it. You need to be very client-centric to be successful, since they already paid and have high expectations.

Do you need HR education? Not really, it helps but not as much as you think it would.
Sr. Member
Aug 23, 2019
628 posts
293 upvotes
rdx wrote:
Sep 23rd, 2019 2:57 pm
I am thinking to have a career change after spending decades working for stable and good pension jobs that I don't enjoy at all. Since my background and whole life have been working in the accounting/finance field, I am thinking being a recruiter for accounting/finance professional could be a good move for me especially I like working with people than numbers. I know it might not be easy as I thought. But at least this idea gets me more excited than finding another job that I will end up with another dead end job I hate.

I wonder how/where I can start with this move e.g. contact different big agencies and see if they are hiring ?

Also, I understand the pay will not be as stable as a regular office job. But would like know if the pay structure is similar from different firms e.g. base pay with commisions.

BTW, I understand some recruitment firms e.g. Robert Half, have a team that deal with the clients (hiring companies) and another team deal with candidates. Is it common for most recruitment firms ? Do I have to pick which ones I should pursue first ? Or should I go for recruitment positions that do both sides ?

Thanks in advance for sharing any information you know.
well, what is your pension?? you said decades so you might have a good pension... can you retire early?
how old are you?
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8262 posts
525 upvotes
Doebird wrote:
Sep 24th, 2019 9:32 pm
well, what is your pension?? you said decades so you might have a good pension... can you retire early?
how old are you?
I wish I can retire now, but at least 10 more years to go even for early retirement......
Sr. Member
Aug 23, 2019
628 posts
293 upvotes
rdx wrote:
Sep 24th, 2019 9:45 pm
I wish I can retire now, but at least 10 more years to go even for early retirement......
you said decades?
10 years out from retirement, is a pretty big pie - if you have a defined benefit plan... you might want to rethink this..
assuming you put 15 years in, 10 years to early retirement.. i mean i dunno how much you hate your life right now.. but some times you gotta decide if you should settle, or take a risk.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8262 posts
525 upvotes
I have worked over 2 decades but do not have the defined benefit pension for the whole career though. If I do, I could have retired from it soon.

You are right, pension is the one major factor that I didn't change job even there was no career advancement and doing the same thing for a decade. And I dealt with it. However, stress level that impacts daily life & health is another concern. Imagine you are worried about going to work every day, and you are thinking about the deliverable at work every night when you are on the bed.........
Doebird wrote:
Sep 24th, 2019 9:49 pm
you said decades?
10 years out from retirement, is a pretty big pie - if you have a defined benefit plan... you might want to rethink this..
assuming you put 15 years in, 10 years to early retirement.. i mean i dunno how much you hate your life right now.. but some times you gotta decide if you should settle, or take a risk.
Sr. Member
Aug 23, 2019
628 posts
293 upvotes
rdx wrote:
Sep 24th, 2019 10:20 pm
I have worked over 2 decades but do not have the defined benefit pension for the whole career though. If I do, I could have retired from it soon.

You are right, pension is the one major factor that I didn't change job even there was no career advancement and doing the same thing for a decade. And I dealt with it. However, stress level that impacts daily life & health is another concern. Imagine you are worried about going to work every day, and you are thinking about the deliverable at work every night when you are on the bed.........
well, you could be thinking about where your next meal is coming from instead if things don't go well?

its hard to give advice without knowing your entire situation, you would know it best.
HR recruiting is tough.

your original post says you worked in accounting/finance... What do you do exactly? maybe you answered earlier, I dunno... The thing is, I'm already getting a sense that you are more of an introvert?
Are you one of the guys?
Can you go out and schmooze people ? Can you talk the talk? Can you dress sharp? Can you ask the right quesitons?
HR recruiting at the high level is almost akin to being a NHL/NFL agent.... maybe not quite, but I hope you catch my drift... you need to network, and you need to network hard.
Your 9-5 will be 9am-Late... specially while you build your rolodex of contacts.
Mid-level, sure, you can do that too, but what's stopping this job from being monotonous???

you will still have targets working for a corporation, just different types of targets/goals... if you're worried about projects and deliverables, that's not going to go away. if anything it will be worse.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2893 posts
646 upvotes
rdx wrote:
Sep 24th, 2019 10:20 pm
However, stress level that impacts daily life & health is another concern. Imagine you are worried about going to work every day, and you are thinking about the deliverable at work every night when you are on the bed.........
Recruiter's deliverables are highly highly HIGHLY unreliable and unpredictable...and emotional. We deliver people who change minds, who consult friends, who have to balance family/spouse needs. And if you don't deliver....that's your paycheque gone for the month or two.

Recruiting is probably more stressful than a month-end. At least, if you put in some more hours and effort, things balance and run.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8262 posts
525 upvotes
Totally agree with what you say. Being a recruiter is definitely not like the routine life as an accountant. I am just really tired of the corporate finance work especially along with the hardship I am getting from the current work culture and work environment......
bhrm wrote:
Sep 25th, 2019 11:47 am
Recruiter's deliverables are highly highly HIGHLY unreliable and unpredictable...and emotional. We deliver people who change minds, who consult friends, who have to balance family/spouse needs. And if you don't deliver....that's your paycheque gone for the month or two.

Recruiting is probably more stressful than a month-end. At least, if you put in some more hours and effort, things balance and run.

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