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Chemical engineering is a very bad option in Ontario.

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  • Mar 19th, 2017 2:13 am
Deal Fanatic
Dec 27, 2013
5268 posts
1301 upvotes
Toronto
mathiewannabe wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2017 7:44 pm
I should have clarified further. There are two types of questions - Behavioural and Technical. I was specifically talking about behavioural question, and that's exactly why I quoted it in previous post as 'behavioural' questions. We all know those are BS questions, and at most places, it's almost all behavioural questions due to the nature of those jobs. i.e. 'why do you want to work here?' , 'when was the first time time you...' ,etc etc .
Answer with some fluff, exaggerate on what you've done, no biggie, etc.


Now, funny you mention google and microsoft . Ones who have rigorous technical interviews for their candidates, not BS questions that expects a fluffy BS answer. BUT most companies, and certainly the majority of the companies are not like Google or Microsoft or Uber or other big tech companies in the US.

2.
Why..? Maybe, it's because Chemical engineering is a very bad option in Ontario like OP says.
What chem. eng field seems to be is that it has the rigour of an engineering program, and job prospects of an arts graduate.

If he can get 3.9 in chem eng at UW, he can get 3.9 in an MBA easy. do that, get a couple of co-ops and work at corporate in Toronto because those are the jobs that pay $$ in TO even though they may or may not add any value to the company and just adds waste to its bureaucracy.
and all he would do is fail at that. you make it sound like it's MBA in hand = JOB at top tier employer. That's not how it works. I know quite a few MBAs that thought this way and are barely employed right now.
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Apr 21, 2004
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daivey wrote:
Jan 4th, 2017 4:07 pm
and all he would do is fail at that. you make it sound like it's MBA in hand = JOB at top tier employer. That's not how it works. I know quite a few MBAs that thought this way and are barely employed right now.
MBA in the States allow for better opportunities even without the relevant work experience if switching to another field/industry.

MBA worked really well for engineers wanting to go to Finance in 2005-08 but not sure about it now.
Deal Addict
Jul 11, 2008
3625 posts
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daivey wrote:
Jan 4th, 2017 4:07 pm
and all he would do is fail at that. you make it sound like it's MBA in hand = JOB at top tier employer. That's not how it works. I know quite a few MBAs that thought this way and are barely employed right now.
the game is to be top 10% in an mba program, and do couple of co-op terms during mba -> $$.

the top 10% part is the important one, as this would initially open the doors at good co-op/intern opportunities at good companies. at least it's not a chem eng where there are not good jobs for even the top 10%. he got into a wrong program at the wrong time. In a parallel universe, if he had picked CS or software engineering or business or ... but i digress..
Jr. Member
Jul 15, 2009
149 posts
50 upvotes
Calgary
mathiewannabe wrote:
Jan 5th, 2017 11:24 am
the game is to be top 10% in an mba program, and do couple of co-op terms during mba -> $$.

the top 10% part is the important one, as this would initially open the doors at good co-op/intern opportunities at good companies. at least it's not a chem eng where there are not good jobs for even the top 10%. he got into a wrong program at the wrong time. In a parallel universe, if he had picked CS or software engineering or business or ... but i digress..
Again, you're still equating good mark (top 10%) from good program (MBA) = good job&pay. While it definitely helps for most people, it's not necessarily a guarantee for anything. OP was graduated with 3.9 GPA from a highly reputable engineering school, he's the top 10% you're talking about already.

Let's look at OP's original post, he mentioned that he received an offer from the biggest electric car company and declined it due to low ball offer. Really? decline an offer from Tesla (presumably)?!? that's almost the equivalent of winning the LottoMax and then rip the winning ticket into pieces!! What kind of increased value do you think having Tesla on your resume? And OP made it sound like the HR low ball newly grad in any number they want. Anyone who works for any moderately sized company would know that's not how HR works, let alone a corporate such as Tesla. And even if they do have the low end that's as OP mentioned, so what? anyone with internet access can research the company and see that experienced engineer in Tesla can make over $180k on the highest end. So it's only a matter of time and effort to get up to speed in terms of compensation wise. And engineering specialist in these kind of companies usually get hunted by their competitors in a matter of few years for big money.

Presuming everything OP said was the truth, that he (or she) is a know-it-all, smarter than everyone else, no time to waste genius. With multiple coop experience with shitty companies (coding slave?), I would question why in the world did a top notch student taking up multiple crappy coop jobs?!? The first coop, yes, anyone can fall for the crappy companies. But multiple times?? Of all people out there, OP should know better that these sweat shops doesn't offer a real career and yet, OP fall for it multiple times? And upon graduation, finally an internationally recognized company that everyone knows it's in the cutting edge of the latest technology gave OP an offer, and yet OP rejected it because the starting salary is too low? And now claiming chemical engineering is crap?

OP's post doesn't make sense on so many level that I'm not going to point out each one of them. My 2 cents is yes, chemical engineering is probably not the best option for the GTA due to the lack of related industries in the province, but one should know this already before they get into the program!! This also applies to all other engineering options in the GTA.
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Jul 11, 2008
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benjuotterly wrote:
Jan 5th, 2017 12:32 pm
Really? decline an offer from Tesla (presumably)?!? that's almost the equivalent of winning the LottoMax and then rip the winning ticket into pieces!!

please. 40-50k usd in silicon valley for tesla is not winning the lottomax at all, not even a $100 prize, i assume even interns make more than that.

experienced engineers in tesla earning 180k on high end? probably software engineers maybe. have to compare apples to apples.
Jr. Member
Jul 15, 2009
149 posts
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Calgary
mathiewannabe wrote:
Jan 5th, 2017 2:27 pm
please. 40-50k usd in silicon valley for tesla is not winning the lottomax at all, not even a $100 prize, i assume even interns make more than that.

experienced engineers in tesla earning 180k on high end? probably software engineers maybe. have to compare apples to apples.
Your prospective just proved many of us correct. Thank you.
Newbie
Jul 13, 2015
23 posts
4 upvotes
mathiewannabe wrote:
Jan 5th, 2017 11:24 am
the game is to be top 10% in an mba program, and do couple of co-op terms during mba -> $$.

the top 10% part is the important one, as this would initially open the doors at good co-op/intern opportunities at good companies. at least it's not a chem eng where there are not good jobs for even the top 10%. he got into a wrong program at the wrong time. In a parallel universe, if he had picked CS or software engineering or business or ... but i digress..
Original poster is already close to top 1% of new engineering grads in Canada, and couldn't find a job. Adding top 10% in an MBA program doesn't do anything to fix whatever problem is preventing them from getting a job. Its clearly not there education. OP has a leg up already based on that.

I think OP needs to internally reflect on why less "paper qualified" people have found jobs and work on resolving that. I.e. all the critical employable skills that have nothing to do with grades.
Deal Addict
Nov 27, 2007
3149 posts
262 upvotes
Apply to be a ontario police officer, Get over paid, limited exposure to crimes, and hand out speeding tickets... In USA police job is suicide, there I suggest getting an engineering job.
Newbie
Nov 21, 2016
91 posts
78 upvotes
I don't get it. Why would people study chemical engineering if there aren't any jobs for them? They easily have access to statistics.

It's idiotic. Chem engineer is a ridiculously hard field. Why waste your hard work, time, and money to be unemployed?

It's like sucking 10 dicks and then getting robbed.
Jr. Member
Jun 9, 2002
102 posts
15 upvotes
The Canadian job market is a bermuda triangle littered with the corpses of the most noble of men.

I've never seen so many good men wasted so badly.
Newbie
Nov 21, 2016
91 posts
78 upvotes
mockingbird wrote:
Jan 5th, 2017 11:58 pm
The Canadian job market is a bermuda triangle littered with the corpses of the most noble of men.

I've never seen so many good men wasted so badly.
I have. When I masterbate.

Joke aside. I know what you mean. But potential is nothing without a way to realize it, for example: landing a good job.

Einstein once said that is it common for a man's potential to be wasted. Rare is the man who utilize it.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2007
7649 posts
464 upvotes
Toronto
User699930 wrote:
Dec 31st, 2016 1:56 pm
Now here is a great read by an intelligent individual who has been screwed by the world. You should seriously consider writing a book or a journal. Great story my friend.

It's funny. My story is similar to yours and I'm in accounting. All the jobs I've gotten were also just an excuse to hire a student in order to recieve government benefits.

I was paid 5$/Hour by my last employer. The government program paid me 10$/hour for a total of 15$/hr. Once the government incentive expired, the company fired me without hesitation. Management was terrible and I basically taught myself everything with the help of Google and books.
"Just **** get it done" was a common phrase used by my boss and managers.

I can relate to you. The world only cares about money. They don't care about where money is coming from. When you went to Waterloo and worked your ass off, the government got money. When companies hired you for coop, they got money. And now, since they used you up and you are no longer valuable, they threw you out like a prostitute. They fked you and left you.

The world is a pimp and student are hookers man.
Horrible terrible generation we live in.
I've had a hell of a time trying to get into my field and actually make close to what I make now. To put it in another light, I've had 3 job offers where the expected level of pay is $55,000/year if not more. 55K would be the minimum. Guess what all 3 offers I got were? 32K, 32.5K and one was 36K. I currently make $54K/year working in the position under what I went to school for. So what does that tell you?

I had a conversation with a friend over drinks recently about 'Should I look elsewhere in the world and perhaps take a huge chance/risk? I don't know, but I almost want to start looking @ other countries.

I am still making good money so will continue doing what I'm doing, but if we're having this hard of a time how do any of you think your children's generations will fare? I say they'd be even worse off than we are now...
Newbie
Nov 21, 2016
91 posts
78 upvotes
XtremeModder wrote:
Jan 6th, 2017 12:41 am
I've had a hell of a time trying to get into my field and actually make close to what I make now. To put it in another light, I've had 3 job offers where the expected level of pay is $55,000/year if not more. 55K would be the minimum. Guess what all 3 offers I got were? 32K, 32.5K and one was 36K. I currently make $54K/year working in the position under what I went to school for. So what does that tell you?

I had a conversation with a friend over drinks recently about 'Should I look elsewhere in the world and perhaps take a huge chance/risk? I don't know, but I almost want to start looking @ other countries.

I am still making good money so will continue doing what I'm doing, but if we're having this hard of a time how do any of you think your children's generations will fare? I say they'd be even worse off than we are now...
That tells me that the world is tough and that you should respect any opportunity that comes to you.

I don't ever plan on having kids. My genes will die off as a symbol of how shit our generation is.

The other day, a random stranger came up to me while I was chilling in the mall and asked if I could hook his 29 year old son with cpa and experience with a job.... how fking sad.

Btw my office building is right next to Scarborough town centre, a shopping mall. I usually small talk with the food employees and he must have overheard.
Member
Apr 13, 2010
346 posts
27 upvotes
Like most people have mentioned OP should have taken any underpaid job that closely aligns with his field and build his experience from there instead of being depressed and wasting time in retail. OPs best bet now is to go back to school before wasting even more time - to separate yourself even more from the rest of your competition (unfortunately) . Nothing is guaranteed, it doesn't take just grades and coop farm experience to be successful in your career you got to have excellent communication, social and emotional intelligence skills. Yes, top engineers are usually smarter than most individuals but it doesn't mean that you will succeed in corporate or if you did an MBA where things are measured by how much you can BS most of the time.
Deal Addict
Jul 11, 2008
3625 posts
1113 upvotes
User699930 wrote:
Jan 5th, 2017 10:25 pm
I don't get it. Why would people study chemical engineering if there aren't any jobs for them? They easily have access to statistics.

It's idiotic. Chem engineer is a ridiculously hard field. Why waste your hard work, time, and money to be unemployed?

It's like sucking 10 dicks and then getting robbed.
i don't know if chem eng has always been bad employment wise, and if it is, OP has much of himself to blame, but we can't change the past and should look towards the future.
i agree with your analogy that it is like sucking 10 dicks and get robbed. Put in all that work, time and money for poor job prospects. We're not talking about easy peazy political science or media arts or some sh!t.

I've graduated from a very tough program and I probably had the one of the worst marks but I still landed an okay job. People who've done exceptionally well in the program are earning much more than me, and they earned it, and probably deserve it.

A lot of older folks like throwing around the word 'entitlement'. How many people think they should be entitled to higher pay because of higher seniority? because they have a more senior job position, even though they're just mediocre at best? because they've so much 'experience' in a job but are just useless as a new grad, yet get paid much more because of said 'experience'?
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