Art and Photography

Choosing which camera to take on a trip

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 12th, 2017 6:36 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Apr 10, 2012
653 posts
255 upvotes
Just updating this thread. I returned from Asia with some great shots and I was more than happy with the s110 (especially at the price I paid). Only downside was the locked ISO when the shutter speed is less than 0.5 seconds. Really annoying for those night shots, but alas, I dealt with it and managed to get some decent pictures nonetheless. If you would like to see some of my "amateur" captures, I uploaded them on flickr:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zn4jB
Deal Addict
Aug 12, 2004
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Calgary
shahram0 wrote:
Oct 11th, 2017 1:18 pm
Just updating this thread. I returned from Asia with some great shots and I was more than happy with the s110 (especially at the price I paid). Only downside was the locked ISO when the shutter speed is less than 0.5 seconds. Really annoying for those night shots, but alas, I dealt with it and managed to get some decent pictures nonetheless. If you would like to see some of my "amateur" captures, I uploaded them on flickr:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zn4jB
Nice that you had a great time. There are several pretty good pics there, composition is pretty good for most too. Try to use the rule of thirds more, but with a better camera I think you can do quite well.

ImageHanoi - Torrential Downpour by S.K.0, on Flickr
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Sep 26, 2007
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thx for sharing..some great shots in there
fyi I wouldn't extend past base ISO (re: halong bay night shot)
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Sep 10th, 2011 12:29 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Apr 10, 2012
653 posts
255 upvotes
Firebot wrote:
Oct 11th, 2017 1:38 pm
Nice that you had a great time. There are several pretty good pics there, composition is pretty good for most too. Try to use the rule of thirds more, but with a better camera I think you can do quite well.
twitchyzero wrote:
Oct 11th, 2017 4:26 pm
thx for sharing..some great shots in there
fyi I wouldn't extend past base ISO (re: halong bay night shot)
Thank you both for the tips. I'll take whatever I can get to improve my shooting :). Regarding the rule of thirds, how would you apply it to shooting architecture, where you're limited in space (not being able to move far enough back) and don't have a wide angle lens? Do you just limit yourself to only a portion of the building/structure?
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Rule of thirds is really more about composition of the image, and not about what is in the picture. It's a simple concept, that you are more prone to see something of interest in corners of the image versus the centre. It's pleasing to the eye. You also want to avoid what can be seen as point and shoot, and playing with angles is a great way to have a different take on the shot. The reason why I linked the one photo in particular is because it is interesting.

The biggest one when shooting landscape or buildings is to have the horizon not cut in the middle of the photo, it is more interesting to view it with leading lines to your point of interest, or looking at a shot that is not symmetric.

These two below aren't my images, but shows the rule very well. The important thing is that it's not a set rule, but your points of interest should be near the vicinity of those corners.

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Here's some of mine that uses it from my travel pages (first time sharing them here in a long time). All points of interest are off centre, and closer to one of those points than the centre.

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Older picture, but a different take on Chichen Itza, uses a mix of angle, leading lines and rule of thirds

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