Students

concordia students?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 29th, 2017 11:13 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 4, 2011
34 posts

concordia students?

I'm from America but I was born in QC and have a Canadian passport. I was thinking about going back to Canada for school. I was looking at McGill but also see Concordia is nearby. Is it a good school for computer science? Will you be able to go back to America and work with that degree? How is campus, classes, weather? Overall, how is Concordia viewed in Canada? thanks.
14 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 11, 2008
1665 posts
146 upvotes
I cannot speak for the computer science program but in terms of the social aspect, concordia is a great school.
RFD Damage since August '08 = lost track
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 4, 2011
34 posts
norgos wrote:
Sep 7th, 2011 1:30 am
I cannot speak for the computer science program but in terms of the social aspect, concordia is a great school.

thank you. can u go into more detail? also is it ok that i know 0 french at all?


and anybody else please?
Newbie
Sep 6, 2011
1 posts
BROSSARD
I'm a Computer Science student at Concordia. I chose Concordia because they seemed to have a more structured and hands on approach to teaching...which, for anything related remotely to IT, is a great asset. Honeslty, just look at the course descriptions at both University, research the teachers and what is being said about them, and talk to people in their second or third year in the program. There are tons of forums and websites out there with people arguing (and even raging) about which University is best for which program. I know a guy who went to McGill and swapped to concordia last year. Anyways, as you can probably tell, I'm biased =P.

In terms of knowing French, I'd say that if you come to QC, French is a nice asset to have for your day to day activities...but for your classes and your studies at either McGill or Concordia, you could be a basic level english speaker (of the fresh-off-the-boat from China type) and still be perfectly capable of completing your courses and understanding. In fact I've known people at Concordia who barely speak English, know nothing of French, and still kick ass in class. At both universities, the main language used for everything is English, we know French, but we barely use it. Also, you'll be learning all the terms and specialized language in english, and even in french sometimes, depending on your program, so you don't have to worry about learning something in Qc and then going back to the US and having to re-learn another lingo. So long story short, French is nice to know when you're going out with friends and the waitress/waiter doesn't know English, but for school, you shouldn't need it. (I'd still learn it if I were you though, it's a beautiful language, if a little annoying with the endless rules.)

Hope this helps, and good luck with your studies!
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 4, 2011
34 posts
Phoenix501 wrote:
Sep 7th, 2011 8:37 pm
I'm a Computer Science student at Concordia. I chose Concordia because they seemed to have a more structured and hands on approach to teaching...which, for anything related remotely to IT, is a great asset. Honeslty, just look at the course descriptions at both University, research the teachers and what is being said about them, and talk to people in their second or third year in the program. There are tons of forums and websites out there with people arguing (and even raging) about which University is best for which program. I know a guy who went to McGill and swapped to concordia last year. Anyways, as you can probably tell, I'm biased =P.

In terms of knowing French, I'd say that if you come to QC, French is a nice asset to have for your day to day activities...but for your classes and your studies at either McGill or Concordia, you could be a basic level english speaker (of the fresh-off-the-boat from China type) and still be perfectly capable of completing your courses and understanding. In fact I've known people at Concordia who barely speak English, know nothing of French, and still kick ass in class. At both universities, the main language used for everything is English, we know French, but we barely use it. Also, you'll be learning all the terms and specialized language in english, and even in french sometimes, depending on your program, so you don't have to worry about learning something in Qc and then going back to the US and having to re-learn another lingo. So long story short, French is nice to know when you're going out with friends and the waitress/waiter doesn't know English, but for school, you shouldn't need it. (I'd still learn it if I were you though, it's a beautiful language, if a little annoying with the endless rules.)

Hope this helps, and good luck with your studies!
thanks alot man. so how's the job placement in computer science for concordia students? and wut is ur usual schedule looking like? I'll also be living in Brossard so I would have to take the bus every day. Do u have any regrets going there also? and are there sports/gym? such as bball and weightlifting... thanks alot.
Newbie
May 22, 2010
32 posts
5 upvotes
Save yourself the trouble.

McGill is known worldwide, Concordia is not.

McGill DEFINITELY has better job prospects afterwards.

At the end of the day, who cares what are the pros and cons of whatever school. The only thing to be considered in my opinion is job prospects.

I went to Concordia. I don't really regret it, but if I had to choose again, definitely would have gone to McGill.
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 4, 2011
34 posts
blee168 wrote:
Sep 8th, 2011 4:51 pm
Save yourself the trouble.

McGill is known worldwide, Concordia is not.

McGill DEFINITELY has better job prospects afterwards.

At the end of the day, who cares what are the pros and cons of whatever school. The only thing to be considered in my opinion is job prospects.

I went to Concordia. I don't really regret it, but if I had to choose again, definitely would have gone to McGill.

ya the problem is the tuition in montreal is so cheap and i wanna take advantage of it.. my tuition is too crazy now. and i can't get into McGill because they don't accept transfers for Spring. What was wrong with Concordia? What did you major in? Did u find a good job? My plan is to just get a degree there and end up working in the US.
Newbie
Dec 7, 2010
30 posts
2 upvotes
If you want to stay inside Montreal, Concordia's program combined with Co-Op is better.
If your program has co-op take Concordia hands down.. most McGill grads will graduate with no experience
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 19, 2008
2082 posts
260 upvotes
Montreal
Go to Concordia if you want to stay in montreal forever, go to Mcgill if you will live elsewhere. I went to Concordia for one semester in mech engineering and I didn't like it because there were noob/new phd grad professors that teach badly. Maybe i was just unlucky?

But when i transfer to Mcgill, the classes was more satisfying since i really learned useful stuffs. Both tuition fees are about the same cost, 6 classes for about $2000 which is a steal compare to anywhere in US.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 11, 2008
1665 posts
146 upvotes
Tonberry wrote:
Sep 19th, 2011 4:43 pm
Go to Concordia if you want to stay in montreal forever, go to Mcgill if you will live elsewhere. I went to Concordia for one semester in mech engineering and I didn't like it because there were noob/new phd grad professors that teach badly. Maybe i was just unlucky?

You're not the only one. It seems to be really hit of miss though. Sometimes you can have the worst teacher but the TA will be your lifesaver. I was unfortunate to have a teacher that never showed to one of my programming classes for C++ and the TA would only do solved examples from the book and wouldn't bother examining a student's code if it was written differently. One of my drafting courses, the TA [who was actually a 2/3rd year student] would scribble poorly on the board and without being clear of what he wants and then just give everyone inconsistent markings when handing in assignments.

I've heard that McGill has had a pretty bad reputation with its Comp Sci program. Read http://degradingmcgill.ca/, although take it with a grain of salt.

You can go to Concordia University without ever speaking a single word of French, seriously. But if you do take the opportunity to learn French [AND YOU SHOULD], it'll open many, many doors for you in Montreal. You have no idea how many engineers I know who can't find jobs just because they can't speak French and they're not willing to speak it either -_-.

Also, Co-OP >>>>>>>>>>>>> everything. Experience is everything, your grades don't mean ****. Everything you'll be learning in class is fine and dandy but you'll need to experience working in a company, whether it's debugging code with a team of analysts or whatever. You also get paid better than min wage [around 12$-15$ for first stage] so you can actually make some money to pay for school and booze. McGill students don't have that opportunity and you'll stand out so much more. If you go to Concordia without applying for the Co-op, then it really doesn't matter whether you go to McGill or Concordia.

When i was in Concordia, my schedule was really ****ed up, but it's all YMMV.
RFD Damage since August '08 = lost track
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 4, 2011
34 posts
norgos wrote:
Sep 19th, 2011 10:13 pm
You're not the only one. It seems to be really hit of miss though. Sometimes you can have the worst teacher but the TA will be your lifesaver. I was unfortunate to have a teacher that never showed to one of my programming classes for C++ and the TA would only do solved examples from the book and wouldn't bother examining a student's code if it was written differently. One of my drafting courses, the TA [who was actually a 2/3rd year student] would scribble poorly on the board and without being clear of what he wants and then just give everyone inconsistent markings when handing in assignments.

I've heard that McGill has had a pretty bad reputation with its Comp Sci program. Read http://degradingmcgill.ca/, although take it with a grain of salt.

You can go to Concordia University without ever speaking a single word of French, seriously. But if you do take the opportunity to learn French [AND YOU SHOULD], it'll open many, many doors for you in Montreal. You have no idea how many engineers I know who can't find jobs just because they can't speak French and they're not willing to speak it either -_-.

Also, Co-OP >>>>>>>>>>>>> everything. Experience is everything, your grades don't mean ****. Everything you'll be learning in class is fine and dandy but you'll need to experience working in a company, whether it's debugging code with a team of analysts or whatever. You also get paid better than min wage [around 12$-15$ for first stage] so you can actually make some money to pay for school and booze. McGill students don't have that opportunity and you'll stand out so much more. If you go to Concordia without applying for the Co-op, then it really doesn't matter whether you go to McGill or Concordia.

When i was in Concordia, my schedule was really ****ed up, but it's all YMMV.

so basically concordia is good because they give you good experience? and the teachers are more hands on? im starting to like it because having hands on experience is best
Newbie
Dec 26, 2007
41 posts
3 upvotes
CALGARY
Concordia is a good undergraduate school. Although I did something completely different (biochemistry) I was really glad that I chose Concordia over McGill for two big reasons:
1. Class sizes are small. I only had one or two classes where the lectures had more than 100 people. This also allows you to meet faculty and they remember you. I think by the time I was done, most of the faculty in Chem/Biochem knew me.
2. Co-op. Although it's possible to get positions without being in co-op, it forces you to find work relevant to your studies.
mastapro wrote:
Sep 29th, 2011 1:52 pm
so basically concordia is good because they give you good experience? and the teachers are more hands on? im starting to like it because having hands on experience is best
So to really address your question, Concordia has the advantage of having a co-op program, where you can get experience. The reason why teachers are more hands-on at Concordia is because the class sizes allow it.
Something I would always keep in mind is that McGill is more renown. However, that really wasn't a big problem for me because I knew I'd be going to grad school and it's that institution's and your supervisor's name that help a lot.
Newbie
Oct 16, 2011
1 posts
VANCOUVER
Hi folks –

I just finished my High School Diploma through Adult Education Center in Vancouver, British Columbia. I am a 29 year old guy. I plan on going to university soon, maybe in the fall 2012. I am very confused these days because I cannot figure out where I should study. Here in British Columbia, there is BCIT. It is a very ideal college in B.C., but the course load is very heavy around 7-8 courses per semester/term. To finish a diploma, a person should have completed 126 credits. This is really, really crazy. Those amounts of credit amount to bachelor degree in a university.

But I have a very strong passion to move out of British Columbia to Montréal, Québec; however, I speak no French. Nevertheless, I found Québec education system is very, very strange. They finish high school at Grade 11, and then 2 years in cégep, and then 3 years in university. In B.C., we have a huge amount of student loan and plus free grant from federal and provincial government, something I don’t see exist in Québec.

I see, I can directly go to Concordia because I already have Grade 12 diploma, but I am scared I could fail because I dislike university setting. I cannot study if in the class there are more than 30 students plus the professors who do not give interaction with students. If the teacher just be in the front of the class giving speech and never go around the class, I can despair; in a college setting, this won't happen. On the other hands, for Montréal case, I have to avoid entering cégep because it is useless and wasting time, 5 years to finish a degree.

My questions are:
1. How does studying in Concordia look like?
2. Are we allowed to take 3 semesters/terms in a year?
3. Maybe for the first year I will take the summer time off the class because I want to have orthognatic (jaw) surgery, is it possible? Any idea about orthodontics and orthognatic surgery, please forward them to me.
4. How many courses will students study in a term?
5. Any info, how much free grant will a student receive from government.
6. I also have few difficult personality traits such as I have difficulty working in team, socially awkward, I am kind of a withdrawn guy.

Please folks reply to my inquiries.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 26, 2006
649 posts
337 upvotes
Montreal Area
imo, I'm doing a grad diploma in computer science at Concordia and the teachers are aweful. The only course where the teacher actually put effort is the prof teaching Technical Writing and Research Methods for Engineers and Computer Scientists.

I wish I have recorded some of the comments the computer teachers made.. would have gotten them fired or disciplined.

Top