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Connecting compression T-Valve to Shut-off valve for Fridge water line?

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  • Dec 21st, 2018 11:12 pm
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Dec 26, 2007
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Connecting compression T-Valve to Shut-off valve for Fridge water line?

Hey everyone,

Looking to install the waterline for my fridge using a braided 15ft hose from underneath the sink.

Currently under the sink is a 1/2" to 3/8" shut off valve connected to Pex. Is there any reason I couldn't install the following Compression T-Valve 3/8 3/8 3/8 between the faucet hose and shut-off and then run the waterline from the side? I can't think of anything - the concern is I wonder why its not used more often as a simple install.

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.comp ... 25820.html

I'm handy enough to do some plumbing. The only other option I could find is either 1) Shark Bite adapter - but not 100% sold on the reliability of those or 2) Using a 1/2 1/2 3/8 tee valve, but it's not sold at Homedepot.
https://www.plumbingplanet.net/product/ ... -comp-tee/

Thanks for the feedback.
Last edited by canadiancynosure on Dec 21st, 2018 4:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
9 replies
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May 24, 2004
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The homedepot link you provided is a compression valve meant to be used on copper pipes and not meant to be used on pex.

I would either use a shark bite or equivalent push fit connection. I wouldn't go out to say they're highly reliable, but have seen freeze tests on them to say I wouldn't hesitate to use them (and I have on most of my bathroom and kitchen island installations) provided they're cost effective. All other times, I would use pex compression fittings to save a few bucks.

The plumbingplanet linked-item is a good alternative.

Edit: you can also opt to use this kit https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.shar ... 62120.html
[OP]
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baymoe wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 3:45 pm
The homedepot link you provided is a compression valve meant to be used on copper pipes and not meant to be used on pex.

I would either use a shark bite or equivalent push fit connection. I wouldn't go out to say they're highly reliable, but have seen freeze tests on them to say I wouldn't hesitate to use them (and I have on most of my bathroom and kitchen island installations) provided they're cost effective. All other times, I would use pex compression fittings to save a few bucks.

The plumbingplanet linked-item is a good alternative.
Thanks for the response - when I read the description of the for the Stop-valve, it reads "Threads onto existing stop or compression fitting" wouldn't that mean it would connect to my existing shut-off valve (image bellow)?
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.12-i ... 12743.html
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May 24, 2004
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No, what you just linked is meant to be connected directly to pex. The threaded end is the connection to either your faucet or dishwasher.

Share a picture of your undersink. Perhaps myself or others can chime in with suggestions.
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baymoe wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 4:05 pm
No, what you just linked is meant to be connected directly to pex. The threaded end is the connection to either your faucet or dishwasher.

Share a picture of your undersink. Perhaps myself or others can chime in with suggestions.
I made a quick diagram of what I'm thinking. Again - I'm just thinking of a simple solution. Not sure if there are any pitfalls - otherwise I wonder why more folks wouldn't use it.
Capture.JPG
valve.jpg
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Apr 19, 2018
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Kitchener/Waterloo, …
canadiancynosure wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 4:19 pm
I made a quick diagram of what I'm thinking. Again - I'm just thinking of a simple solution. Not sure if there are any pitfalls - otherwise I wonder why more folks wouldn't use it.

Capture.JPG
valve.jpg
It would seem the solution would work, especially in the light of the sole reviewer's comment on the HD website who used it to be able to add a water connection to the dishwasher.

The only question I would have is whether you are using 3/8" hose to go to the fridge. Usually, 1/4" hose is used for that. I suppose you could put a 3/8 to 1/4 reducer on the fitting going to the fridge.

Maybe something like this would be better for this application at half the cost.
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Any of the "Add-A-Stop" valves are fine, because they thread onto the existing valve instead of replacing the existing valve. But is there a reason why you want 3/8 braided? You can just get this kit with 15' of 1/4 pex:

LINK

As Enlgma mentioned, fridge icemakers use 1/4, so if you really use a 3/8 hose, you'll need an adapter.
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Kitchener/Waterloo, …
jm1 wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 6:15 pm
Any of the "Add-A-Stop" valves are fine, because they thread onto the existing valve instead of replacing the existing valve. But is there a reason why you want 3/8 braided? You can just get this kit with 15' of 1/4 pex:

LINK

As Enlgma mentioned, fridge icemakers use 1/4, so if you really use a 3/8 hose, you'll need an adapter.
That would be an all-in-one solution for sure. Could have used that kind of kit the last time I hooked up water to a fridge. I cheaped out though since I was in a rental apartment at the time with fridge included but not connected. Got a saddle valve instead (latched on to copper plumbing) plus the length of 1/4 hose and two end connectors.
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jm1 wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 6:15 pm
Any of the "Add-A-Stop" valves are fine, because they thread onto the existing valve instead of replacing the existing valve. But is there a reason why you want 3/8 braided? You can just get this kit with 15' of 1/4 pex:

LINK

As Enlgma mentioned, fridge icemakers use 1/4, so if you really use a 3/8 hose, you'll need an adapter.
Ah yes - you all are right, it's 1/4" for the water line to the fridge. I like the new adapter idea, though I've read on various reviews that the braided / cooper are nicer in terms of water taste.
Enlgma wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 7:08 pm
That would be an all-in-one solution for sure. Could have used that kind of kit the last time I hooked up water to a fridge. I cheaped out though since I was in a rental apartment at the time with fridge included but not connected. Got a saddle valve instead (latched on to copper plumbing) plus the length of 1/4 hose and two end connectors.
yeah - I saw the saddle valve - even less a fan of them then Shark bite kits. I would rather go with a straight forward solution like the adapter, or bite the bullet and cut into the pex.


I think I'm going to go with this - I don't think water pressure should be an issue since I would rarely run the fridge and faucet at the same time.
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.comp ... 25821.html
https://www.lowes.ca/refrigerator-acces ... 46659.html
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May 24, 2004
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I grabbed what I have laying around and hopefully this would help better explain what I would do. First remove the existing valve. You can reuse it in place of the valve at the top as it is 3/8". Fridge connections are usually 1/4".

Image

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