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  • Sep 23rd, 2008 3:49 pm
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 19, 2007
124 posts

Cork Flooring?

Hey guys,

After much waffling about flooring for my main-floor reno, I am now seriously considering going with cork. (Thanks to CSK's Mom and Dustbunny for the impetus to go this way!)

With 3 kids & 2 dogs & 2 cats - I seriously do not want to stress my heart further worrying about spills and stains and such. I dream of a beautiful hardwood, even scratched with character, but with my crew, it would be more like Apocalypse Now (I also want to put a pool in -- Imagine the hardwood-floor-disaster possibilities!) I almost decided on porcelain, but was also terrified of the cold, hard, echoing look. With so many wonderful reviews on cork, AND the fact that it is more "green" ... I think I've been swayed.

So, my next question is -- does anyone know which cork is better than the other? What should I look for? I know I'm probably going to go for the floating floor version over tiles, unless someone convinces me otherwise. Can anyone share their cork experiences?

Many thanks,
C
9 replies
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1918 posts
10 upvotes
KELOWNA
Like anything else, you really have to shop for cork. You can count on it all coming from Portugal but like other flooring it will vary in quality, thickness, type of click/lock, coatings, colours, patterns, price. You will need to actually see the best type for your application (maybe you want to be sure it will survive spills and water or has a thicker backing to go over the tiles?).

I probably mentioned before that the stuff at HD was crap IMO especially when compared to the types found in better flooring stores. You can tell just by it's look and feel and when you see how it scratches it's walk away time but go and look at it, scratch it with your finger nail (and do it hard) so you can compare when you see the other qualities out there.

In case I didn't mention it before, I went to a lot of places and checked it out and when I happened into a lumber store that carries flooring, no question in my mind, theirs was as good as the high end stores were carrying so I could buy without even thinking too much about it (it was even less expensive than HD because they import directly).

If you were in Calgary I could point you in the right direction.
Newbie
Dec 12, 2003
11 posts
I am interested in cork flooring also, and I live in Calgary.
Can you recommend a good supplier.
Thanks in advance.
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1918 posts
10 upvotes
KELOWNA
Take a look at Timbertown. That's where I got mine and it's been great especially for the price.
Newbie
Jul 20, 2008
1 posts
I have just finished installing Torlys cork plank flooring for my kitchen and is very happy with it. This is my first time installing any flooring so I chose the easier to install large uniclick planks (12" by 36"). The down side is that it generate more waste (you will need to add extra 10% to the area). The smaller tiles will probably generate less waste. I also found the larger planks look nicer.
Member
Oct 20, 2003
364 posts
1 upvote
Waterloo
I am also looking at the Torly's cork flooring... where would I find the best prices on this or similar quality product? I like the look of the beveled edge planks that Torly's has. But still not 100% set on the beveled edges.

Thanks!
Member
Oct 20, 2003
364 posts
1 upvote
Waterloo
Should add that anywhere in the GTA or ideally Waterloo is where I'm interested in purchasing.
Newbie
Sep 22, 2008
77 posts
12 upvotes
I intstalled cork planks in my kitchen and love the look and feel of them. They were easy to install and dont require any special extras (underpad, glue, etc). The only worry I have in your situation with many kids and pets, is that it is not going to last as long as you would like. Ive had a few nicks and dings in the floor in the eight months of laying it and am probally looking at replacing it within the next three or four years. I ended up buying the more expensive thicker and durable cork planks, but in high traffic areas I find im constantly sweeping and checking for debis. One sugestion that a friend brought forward, was to use a special floor sealer that would bring an extra added layer of protection. I plan on looking into that in the near future, and hopefully add a few years of life to my beautiful floor.
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1918 posts
10 upvotes
KELOWNA
Doesn't sound like that cork was actually more durable. I'd be going after the store or warranty if I were you. I've had mine down over a year now, with a dog, and it looks like the day it was laid. Any dents have popped back up, any cuts have pretty much self-healed. I suspect you have a dud product there if you are getting daily debris. That isn't good at all.

Meanwhile, like anything else, price is no indicator it seems. I made a point of scratching the samples in every store I went to and there was no contest that some cork was just crap (Home Depot comes to mind) and couldn't even take a fingernail going after it.

There is a sealer you can buy. I've seen it in flooring stores and it sells for about $15 and would probably do your kitchen 3 or 4 times because a little goes a long way. It does make the floor a bit shinier (at least the samples I saw were).
Check that the binder your floor is made with doesn't emit nasty stuff like formaldehyde. Some of the cheaper stuff from China does.
FYI, pretty much any cork you can find seems to be made in Portugal. Not saying their rules are better or worse than anywhere else, just to say it's probably nothing to do with China.
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