Expired Hot Deals

[Costco] Northrock Road Bike SCR1 $570

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 16th, 2017 4:54 pm
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
7000 posts
756 upvotes
etgohomeok wrote:
May 4th, 2017 12:42 pm
I purchased the CTM from the Costco in Kingston. If anyone has any specific questions I'm happy to answer them. I'm using it as a commuting bike on bumpy city roads.

First impressions are the the quality seems nice. The disk brakes are a huge plus. I've only ever had regular brakes before and the disc brakes are so much easier to adjust.

The quick release wheels are garbage and really struggled putting the front wheel back on when I got home because if it. Broke the plastic cover for the nut on the other side pretty much immediately. But once I got the wheel back on it was fine.

I'm 6'1" and with the seat all the way up it fits pretty well.

Gear ratio comments on here are correct. Going down hill i can't really pedal to go faster. Doesn't really bother me though since I'm not racing or anything.
Lower gear ratio is actually more optimal, higher endurance.
Macho men would want to ride in super high gear ration so they can prove something but the truth is, it's best to be spinning, 60-80RPM, athletes does 120RPM even.
It may feel weird but you'll get used to it and you'll tire yourself much less by spinning, doing cardio with the slow twitching muscle fibers than depleting the fast twitching muscle fibers which only last so long...for a sprint for example.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 8, 2008
2987 posts
475 upvotes
GTA
Hey I'm 6'6 (most height in legs) do you think it's even worth for me to check it out or has someone here actually sat on it and can just tell me.
Member
Feb 22, 2009
278 posts
67 upvotes
Ottawa
jarko wrote:
May 4th, 2017 12:59 pm
Hey I'm 6'6 (most height in legs) do you think it's even worth for me to check it out or has someone here actually sat on it and can just tell me.
The SCR-1 road bike tops out at 6'1" and the XC29 tops out at 6'3", so probably not worth your time.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 25, 2011
1738 posts
4884 upvotes
Laval
stevewk wrote:
May 4th, 2017 2:16 pm
The SCR-1 road bike tops out at 6'1" and the XC29 tops out at 6'3", so probably not worth your time.
I'm 5.8" not worth to get the SCR-1?
Newbie
Apr 28, 2017
3 posts
That looks super nice and has a great price. But I can't imagine buying such a big ticket item without trying it first.
Deal Addict
Sep 29, 2005
3831 posts
344 upvotes
Montreal
Daijoubu wrote:
May 4th, 2017 12:29 pm
Low quality spokes? Bent rim/uneven spoke tensions?
If a rim is not true and the only thing keeping it straight are the spokes, then you'll end up with overly tight and overly loose spokes, continuous cycle of breakage as the spokes loosens up and the remaining takes even more load and ends up breaking.
If the wheel has a decent hub and rim is still in good shape, I would release tension on all the spokes and check the rim for trueness, if the rim is true, I would replace all the spokes with quality DT Swiss or Wheelsmith ones.
If not, try to bend the rim back into shape or replace it (or get an new wheel)
Actually, it's a bike similar to OP's. The real issue is I do about 5,000 KMs every year and have you witnessed Montreal roads?
Phils
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
7000 posts
756 upvotes
I'm from Montreal also :)
I do weight less, around 140 lbs but then I ride on wheels I've built myself using DT Swiss spokes and my commute is only about 11KM, so about 2000KM per year without counting the weekend rides.
If you have the money, I would look into upgrading the wheelset later on, get a set with hubs that uses sealed cartridge bearing, much less maintenance/higher tolerance, no monkeying around.
Loose cups/cones bearings needs to be regreased/repacked once in a while, especially if you ride in rain, dust, etc.

For lower end wheelset, I usually replace the caged bearings with quality loose bearings (very cheap and more bearings = less wear) and pack it full of grease as they put very little out of the factory.
And quite often it's not properly adjusted or the bearings are of poor quality (not round or imperfection, etc), try spinning the wheel between your fingers to get a feel whether or not its grainy.
Some grainyness new is normal due to low tolerances but should still spin freely.

Loose vs caged bearing (bottom bracket)


I would visit your friendly neighborhood bike coop if you're the handy type
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
1587 posts
564 upvotes
KINGSTON
Rlcky wrote:
May 4th, 2017 2:30 pm
I'm 5.8" not worth to get the SCR-1?
The SCR-1 is a medium frame, I believe. You should be fine with it.
The upshot of buying from Costco is, the no quibble return policy. You'll want to put some km's on it before you make a decision, though. All bikes have a "feel" to them, and take getting used to.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
1587 posts
564 upvotes
KINGSTON
neonic wrote:
May 1st, 2017 4:10 pm
Not sure if it makes easier to understand, but think of smartphones. You can buy a cheap Chinese branded for like 50 dollars (on AliExpress, geekbuy, dealextreme), and can buy like an iPhone 7 plus for 1,300 - Some can say they do exactly the same things: they call, they have similar apps, camera, wifi, gps... what make the difference?

Brands are a factor in Bikes as well, but each of parts will have impact on price. worth mentioning that isn't hard to see bikes costing more than brand new cars.
On a high end bike (from a 2-3K to a 20K+?), probably weight difference and some gizmo here and there, but from 100 to 500 bike is brutal, it's like the smartphone comparison. I'm not expert in any means, but I kinda like bikes.

I'd separate a bike in 3 parts (that for road, hybrid, city... MTB/DH styles you'd need to count suspensions as well):

* Frame set (basically frame+fork),
* Wheel set (rims, spokes, hubs),
* Group set ("gears" or Derailleur, brakes, crank set...)

As you can see, each part is actually made by a whole bunch of parts... but normally sold as each set. Also didn't include some other stuff like saddle, seat post, handlebar, stem, pedals, tires ... (and those add lots on price, but more visible on mid to high end game);

* Frame set: Most of cheap bikes' frame are steel made. which means heavier. but apart of that, I'd be a bit concerned on quality as well. I've seen some scary welding on those... entry level will be normally Aluminium made, and better quality. from there you can find some other materials, high end ones normally will have carbon fibre, but you can see some other materials for different bikes (like titanium) - from the initial models you can see a difference on weight and geometry, high end might even consider aerodynamics stuff (those track bikes for instance, crazy stuff!)
* Wheel set: You probably won't consider much as well, maybe starting on 1.5K, but your MEC midtown have way better wheels than probably any Canadian Tire one. High end will be lighter, have better bearings, looks better and even aero as well
* Group set: we basically have 3 brands Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo (this latter probably just on road high end bikes). This is where we (non super pro individuals) can see a major price difference, and A $100-200 probably will have a cheapo rip off chinese branded. each brand will have some hierarchy; That hierarchy will change: number of speeds (8 to 11 on Road, 6 to 10? on MTB); Weight and Durability (differently from most of stuff, you'll see a decline in durability on higher end groups!)
Nice write up.
I've had to explain this to many, many people over the years.

I've also found that people fixate on a type of bike, rather than a quality bike that suits their needs, and trying to dissuade them from buying the wrong type of bike can be a challenge. "I need a full suspension bike, because the roads are bumpy here"; to which I reply, "No, you need to avoid the potholes, and get your arse off the seat on the smaller bumps."
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
1587 posts
564 upvotes
KINGSTON
Daijoubu wrote:
May 4th, 2017 12:41 pm
There's always BikesDirect but not as interesting now with the low CAD (and Trump, crossing the border, etc...), Amazon.ca has a few decent bikes too.
I used to ship them across the border and pick em up at FreePortForwarding in Champlain.

I bought a RetroSpec AMOK v2 cross with 16 speeds, Shimano Claris STI, for $466, good quality, many sizes to choose from but does require assembly.
Chromoly steel (which is a quality steel compared to the crappy hi-tensile steel in dept store bikes)...because steel is real :) aluminum is too harsh to ride in the city, ok on a road bike for training on the track where stiffness is desirable for performance reason.

One more thing about hybrids and upright position: it may feel more confortable BUT ONLY FOR SHORT RIDES, < 15-30mins.
The saddle is really a saddle, it's not a SEAT, on an upright position bike, all your weight is on your butt, a properly fitted "bent over" geometry can be much more confortable if you rode 1h+ as your weight is balanced over the pedals and the handle bar, so you butt only sees 1/2 to 1/3 of your weight as opposed to close to 100%.

Also get a saddle of the proper width with not too much paddle, the more paddle, the more tissues get compressed and the the more it hurts! It only feels more confy at first.
For me, I find that a wider, flat saddle with minimal padding works best (like the ones for women), you'll want the saddle to be at least as wide as your sit bones.

Image
https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss? ... spec+cross

I've put full fenders, 700x25 and a rack on it, cross brake levers, it's my commuter.
Buying a bike from BikesDirect or Amazon is definitely not for everyone, (or most people, for that matter).
You obviously know what you are getting into, and that's great (if you are building your own wheels you have my utmost respect). However, 99% of the population can't adjust their brake pads properly, let alone assemble a bike. Or even know if what they are buying is a decent bike in the first place.
Good info in your post, otherwise.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
7000 posts
756 upvotes
I didn't know much about bikes, everyone has to start somewhere, but if you're the manual kind of person and like to learn and doesn't mind getting thier hands dirty (actually, you can also wear gloves and not get them dirty at all :))

Back when I started, I had to rely on books only but nowadays information is available at our finger tip on the internets, at first I did simple maintenances to my own bike, brakes and chains, adjusting the derailleurs and so on.

Then I wanted to do more, I started hanging out at a bike coop (RightToMove) and shortly after learning the ropes, bought a fixed gear bike then a frame to build it from scratch (only to sell it because it was redundant lol), then boughts bought 2 boxes of 100 spokes (RFD style) to build 3 wheelsets (one for my build, one for my buddy and the other for sale), it was the fixed gear bike craze at that time as well.
I then started volunteering and did it for 2 years on Sundays afternoons where I would help other fix their bikes and further improve my knowledge.

So if there's a will, there's a way :) knowledge is power

Edit: Actually, it may be better to buy a bike unassembled and do it yourself following the instructions by the book then it is to fix a someone else's poor assembly and you learn at the same time.
That's what I would suggest if all one can afford is a CT bike, buy it online boxed and DIY.

It's fairly simple really, the bike is already 90% assembled, front wheel, handle bar, pedals and seat post (I think it stops there at the store)
Align the brake pads, remove any cables slack and it should end up better than what those monkeys put togheter.

My brother is not very manual inclined and even he was able to do it himself with some help over the phone from me, so anyone else can do it if they put their minds into it.

I once bought something as simple as a wheelbarrow from RenoDepot, they had too much stock (and perhaps freetime) that they decided to assemble them for free to move stock.
It was put togheter in a swift... so I ended up having to dissassemble it and redo it, doing twice the work!
Last edited by Daijoubu on May 5th, 2017 12:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Member
User avatar
Oct 5, 2007
285 posts
343 upvotes
Ancaster
Its tough finding the right bike when you know what you want. here's my want list

hybrid
chromoly frame (this is what makes finding my bike difficult)
21+ spd
linear pull brakes
altus/ acera level components
price $500-$700

jamis coda seems to be ideal for me, but i would have to ride it first and the only shop i see is in toronto

I see a lot of singlespeed bikes with nice chromoly frames.....why is that? do the bike makers assume if you want multiple gears that you are more concerned with speed and the weight savings of aluminum?

I have a feeling I will probably end up having to go with an aluminum frame just due to the massive selection. :(
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
7000 posts
756 upvotes
foggydayz wrote:
May 5th, 2017 12:54 pm
Its tough finding the right bike when you know what you want. here's my want list

hybrid
chromoly frame (this is what makes finding my bike difficult)
21+ spd
linear pull brakes
altus/ acera level components
price $500-$700

jamis coda seems to be ideal for me, but i would have to ride it first and the only shop i see is in toronto

I see a lot of singlespeed bikes with nice chromoly frames.....why is that? do the bike makers assume if you want multiple gears that you are more concerned with speed and the weight savings of aluminum?

I have a feeling I will probably end up having to go with an aluminum frame just due to the massive selection. :(
There are lots of touring/cross style bikes in chromoly.
Not as relax as a hybrid but still more relaxed then road geometry.

KONA makes a few: PENTHOUSE, (Honky)Tonk, could be in the upper end of your price range if you can locate older stock.
The classic Trek 520 (can get pricey)
To name a few, Fuji has one too but not as widely available.

Do you really need that many speeds? It's also physically impossible to use them all, you don't want to run a chain in diagonal lol and some gears overlap
On a 21 speed, maybe 13 is useable, 16 out of 24 speeds, without taking into account overlaps
V-brakes calipers are fairly cheap to replace and shouldn't be a deciding factor
I wouldn't worry too much about the groupset at that price point, all of Shimano's, even the entry level one Tourney, works just fine, it might not be as durable but it really only gets lighter as you step up.
Don't forget about "road" groupset as well: Claris and Sora for the same level.
Also don't mind not having the entire groupset, I doubt you'll find it at that price level, you'll usually find Tektro brakes, SRAM/noname crankset and noname wheelset, you do want to have a non-riveted crankset so you can swap out/change each of the chainring, of which you won't find in a entry level Shimano one.

There's that Retrospec I've posted above on Amazon with only 16 speeds, cantilever brakes and Claris for $500-600, if you're mechanically inclined, if not, I'm sure you can always find a bike shop that is willing to assemble it for you, I wouldn't want to deal with one that refuses to do so, so find the right one.

Edit: About the weight, a cheap aluminum frame can weight as much if not as more as a quality chromoly frame
Newbie
May 2, 2017
3 posts
13 upvotes
I bought this bike as a cheap beater. I'm a competitive cyclist and an ex-mechanic, but I will try to relate to the target audience. I try my best not to be a bike snob, and strongly believe in people just riding bikes, any bikes, as long as they are safe. My analysis will border on the esoteric for most, but I do not claim to know everything either. Sooo... my analysis:

Frame - appears to be hydrdoformed top & down tube and chainstays. good, consistent, double pass welds. head tube is swaged and tapered. weighed 1430 grams on my gram scale with waterbottle bolts and top headset bearing in place, seatpost clamp was removed. i suspect tubes are butted, given the weight. Frame is made in China, which is no big deal. Many high end carbon bikes are made in China as well.
Fork - shocker here, it is a FULL CARBON FORK! ok, dropouts are aluminum, but it is carbon from steerer to blades, and no alloy crown. speaking of crown, it is very tight for clearance, you may or may not be able to squeeze a 25mm tire in there, depending on the model of tire and the width of the rim, weighs 360 grams
Wheels - a bit surprised/disappointed, rims are HEAVY, straight 14 gauge spokes, 28 hole fr/rr, loose ball bearing hubs with basic rubber "seal", as expected, bearings are very rough brand new, may smooth out over time, i don't care to find out though as I'm running a spare set of training wheels, stock wheels weigh almost 2400 grams bare, no skewer, no cassette, no tires.. was hoping for low 2kg wheel set, but oh well...
Tires - cheap Kenda, wire bead tires, very stiff, marked as a 23mm but appears to be quite narrow, especially on the stock rims, didn't bother weighing
Crankset - advertised as being forged (as opposed to cast which is lower quality/less stiff, weaker), inner and outer chainrings are steel, square taper bottom bracket, cranks were in the neighborhood of 900 grams or so and bottom bracket roughly 300 grams, compact 50/34 gearing
Cables - yes, i'm even mentioning the cables... why? because they appear to be Shimano sil-tec coated cables, i was expecting cheap, galvanized steel cables, which have more friction and corrode much quicker, but they even used nice cables, for shift cables at least. brake cables are still decent, die drawn stainless (die drawing smooths the outer surface of the cable to reduce friction)
Housings - no name from what i can tell, standard fare stuff, seems to work fine
Brakes - cheap Promax brakes (large, chinese OEM manufacturer of low to mid level bike parts) with solid, one piece pads, i switched to Shimano R55C4 cartridge pads that i have laying around, with the switch, they actually work pretty good, not lacking in any way, even decent in the rain
Chain - Very decent, mid level KMC X9.93 chain
Cassette - Genuine Shimano Sora HG-50 9 speed cassette, BUT: it is a 12-25 gear range. considering the target buyer of such a bike, that is very tall gearing
Drivetrain- NEW Sora R3000 shifters, derailleurs. shifter hoods and lever blade feels just like Tiagra, 105, Ultegra, etc. typical Shimano smooth and light shift action with a bit more lever throw for shifting compared to TIagra 10 spd and 105 and up 11 spd,
Geometry/Fit - bicycle geometry has no consistency, one manufacturers medium could fit someone 5'6", while another's would be intended for someone 6' tall. bikes are also not a one size fits all (obviously), but to claim that this bike can fit someone who is 5'7" is quite a stretch IMHO. i am 5'10" of average proportions, and it just fits me. i tend to prefer smaller/more compact sizing than most though. i would estimate the top tube to be roughly 56cm, the seat tube is likely 53.5cm but is not very relevant as it is a sloping top tube design, so standover height is less of an issue. the head tube is roughly 170cm with chainstays in the neighborhood of 42.5 cm. in other words, it is a fairly relaxed, endurance type of fit. i would suggest maybe 5'9" would be a minimum, and only if such a person has unusually long limbs, up to about 6' in terms of a fit range.

Ride - I will try to isolate my opinion of the frame as much as possible. My current set up includes changing the cranks to a Shimano Sora crankset that I had laying around. It is the previous generation, 5 arm crank (FC-R3500) but still almost a pound lighter than the original, and i suspect much stiffer as well. I'm running a set of Fulcrum Racing 5 LG wheels (decent low to mid level training wheel) with old Michelin Pro 3 tires in 23mm width. Saddle is a Selle Italia SLR Team. I switched the bar to an FSA Gossamer Wing Pro Compact like handlebar that was a take off from another bike. With Crank Bros Candy pedals, my SCR-1 weighs 19 lbs even. I recall it being roughly 22 lbs and change, stock. I've since added a set of Crud Road Racer fenders and commuted a few days in the rain on it. So far, only about 80kms or so, this week. Bike feels surprisingly stiff. Quite a bit stiffer than I expected, or am used to. Granted, my winter commuter has been a 2016 Giant TCX SLR 1 cyclocross bike, with a few recent outings on my Cannondale CAAD12 Red when weather is nice enough. The bike picks up speed surprisingly well with my much lighter wheels, but the point is, the frame doesn't seem to be holding the bike back. It responds very well when accelerating, or sprinting, with no chain or brake rub when I try to put out what meager power I can manage to muster. Flips side to the stiffness is a fairly harsh ride. Think old school alloy bike, which has a reputation for having a harsh and rattly ride characteristics. I suspect swapping out the 355 gram alloy seatpost in 30.9mm diameter for a cheap 27.2 carbon seatpost with shim would certainly help here, and is on my to-do list for this bike. It should also save roughly a quarter pound to boot. Worth mentioning again is the gearing. Most casual cyclist would likely struggle going uphill on this bike, with it's tall gearing. I happen to like it, as it keeps the jumps from gear to gear fairly tight. Handling is a bit on the leisurely side of things for a road bike, which would make sense for this type of bike. It would still be quite a bit more responsive than a hybrid, and definitely a MTB. Not right or wrong, just different design for different purpose. For a very casual cyclist, who is looking to ride a handful of times a year in the summer, go for a hybrid bike. For someone who is interested in trying out a road bike, and can stretch a few upgrades into the budget as well, this bike is worth considering. $570 for a very decent frameset with the new Shimano Sora basic drivetrain components is very hard to beat. Heck, I even plan on trying a few tune up races on this thing, for giggles.

Top