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[Costco] Northrock Road Bike SCR1 $570

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  • Jul 21st, 2017 2:40 pm
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Oct 5, 2007
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Daijoubu wrote:
May 5th, 2017 1:30 pm
Do you really need that many speeds? It's also physically impossible to use them all, you don't want to run a chain in diagonal lol and some gears overlap

good point.


on my 21 spd I use the 12th gear over 95% of the time for just cruising around (my worn slipping middle chainring indicates this) . other than that i just need a fairly low gear for steep hills ( i actually like to climb hills in a relatively high gear as well but its nice to have a low one just in case), and a nice high gear for speed.

thanks for your post , i will consider different numbers of gears
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Huey604 wrote:
May 6th, 2017 3:32 am
Geometry/Fit - bicycle geometry has no consistency, one manufacturers medium could fit someone 5'6", while another's would be intended for someone 6' tall. bikes are also not a one size fits all (obviously), but to claim that this bike can fit someone who is 5'7" is quite a stretch IMHO. i am 5'10" of average proportions, and it just fits me. i tend to prefer smaller/more compact sizing than most though. i would estimate the top tube to be roughly 56cm, the seat tube is likely 53.5cm but is not very relevant as it is a sloping top tube design, so standover height is less of an issue. the head tube is roughly 170cm with chainstays in the neighborhood of 42.5 cm. in other words, it is a fairly relaxed, endurance type of fit. i would suggest maybe 5'9" would be a minimum, and only if such a person has unusually long limbs, up to about 6' in terms of a fit range.
excellent appraisal. It's really too bad about the sizing, First, as you said, it's fits bigger than what is recommended. If they offered it in a Small (for short guys like me or women) and Large even for purchase online only, it would have been a more useful deal. I'm 5.7" and I could barely straddle this bike. I cringe whenever I see somebody riding a wrong sized cheap bike. Especially for a road bike, where the reach and stack is more important than a cruiser.
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etgohomeok wrote:
May 4th, 2017 12:42 pm
I purchased the CTM from the Costco in Kingston. If anyone has any specific questions I'm happy to answer them. I'm using it as a commuting bike on bumpy city roads.

First impressions are the the quality seems nice. The disk brakes are a huge plus. I've only ever had regular brakes before and the disc brakes are so much easier to adjust.

The quick release wheels are garbage and really struggled putting the front wheel back on when I got home because if it. Broke the plastic cover for the nut on the other side pretty much immediately. But once I got the wheel back on it was fine.

I'm 6'1" and with the seat all the way up it fits pretty well.

Gear ratio comments on here are correct. Going down hill i can't really pedal to go faster. Doesn't really bother me though since I'm not racing or anything.
I'm 6'1" as well and thought this bike might be too small. How are you liking it after a bit of use? Would you get something bigger if you could?
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Huey604 wrote:
May 6th, 2017 3:32 am
Ride - I will try to isolate my opinion of the frame as much as possible. My current set up includes changing the cranks to a Shimano Sora crankset that I had laying around. It is the previous generation, 5 arm crank (FC-R3500) but still almost a pound lighter than the original, and i suspect much stiffer as well. I'm running a set of Fulcrum Racing 5 LG wheels (decent low to mid level training wheel) with old Michelin Pro 3 tires in 23mm width. Saddle is a Selle Italia SLR Team. I switched the bar to an FSA Gossamer Wing Pro Compact like handlebar that was a take off from another bike. With Crank Bros Candy pedals, my SCR-1 weighs 19 lbs even. I recall it being roughly 22 lbs and change, stock. I've since added a set of Crud Road Racer fenders and commuted a few days in the rain on it. So far, only about 80kms or so, this week. Bike feels surprisingly stiff. Quite a bit stiffer than I expected, or am used to. Granted, my winter commuter has been a 2016 Giant TCX SLR 1 cyclocross bike, with a few recent outings on my Cannondale CAAD12 Red when weather is nice enough. The bike picks up speed surprisingly well with my much lighter wheels, but the point is, the frame doesn't seem to be holding the bike back. It responds very well when accelerating, or sprinting, with no chain or brake rub when I try to put out what meager power I can manage to muster. Flips side to the stiffness is a fairly harsh ride. Think old school alloy bike, which has a reputation for having a harsh and rattly ride characteristics. I suspect swapping out the 355 gram alloy seatpost in 30.9mm diameter for a cheap 27.2 carbon seatpost with shim would certainly help here, and is on my to-do list for this bike. It should also save roughly a quarter pound to boot. Worth mentioning again is the gearing. Most casual cyclist would likely struggle going uphill on this bike, with it's tall gearing. I happen to like it, as it keeps the jumps from gear to gear fairly tight. Handling is a bit on the leisurely side of things for a road bike, which would make sense for this type of bike. It would still be quite a bit more responsive than a hybrid, and definitely a MTB. Not right or wrong, just different design for different purpose. For a very casual cyclist, who is looking to ride a handful of times a year in the summer, go for a hybrid bike. For someone who is interested in trying out a road bike, and can stretch a few upgrades into the budget as well, this bike is worth considering. $570 for a very decent frameset with the new Shimano Sora basic drivetrain components is very hard to beat. Heck, I even plan on trying a few tune up races on this thing, for giggles.
So it sounds like wheelset and seat post are the most important upgrades for weight / riding comfort.
What do you recommend and where can i get them for a fair price?

I was looking at this MEC seat post: https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5038-112/ ... -Offset%29
And the R501 wheelset: https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5034-312/ ... 9-10-Speed
This space is intentionally left blank.
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Feb 4, 2017
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manu117 wrote:
May 7th, 2017 10:44 am
I'm 6'1" as well and thought this bike might be too small. How are you liking it after a bit of use? Would you get something bigger if you could?
The fit is good but only with the seat pulled all the way up. If you're someone who likes having the seat high such that your legs are extended all the way when at the bottom of the pedal rotation, this one might be too small. I suppose if an equivalent bike of the same type, quality, and cost was available in a larger size then I would go one size up.
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savingforever wrote:
May 3rd, 2017 12:21 pm
Sorry, I should have clarified. I tried the road bike (SCR1). I didn't try the hybrids since I already have one of those and was hoping to get a road bike but the SCR1 at Costco was too big--if only they carried the smaller version in store.

How tall are you? Looking for something that'll fit someone who's 5'7
:arrowl: Thanks if Helped! :D
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May 2, 2017
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Thundercloud wrote:
May 7th, 2017 9:49 pm
So it sounds like wheelset and seat post are the most important upgrades for weight / riding comfort.
What do you recommend and where can i get them for a fair price?

I was looking at this MEC seat post: https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5038-112/ ... -Offset%29
And the R501 wheelset: https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5034-312/ ... 9-10-Speed
That MEC seatpost is not available in 30.9 diameter, according to their website. Besides from going with a carbon seatpost, I would suggest going with a 27.2 diameter seatpost, to allow for a bit more compliance. You will just need to purchase a shim to adapt the smaller seatpost to the larger seattube opening, which isn't a big deal. I also feel that a $90 seatpost on a sub $600 bike is a bit excessive, unless you have one already. I was planning on buying any cheap eBay carbon seatpost and shim.

Wheels should work though, but I recall those R501s being in the high 1900 gram range for weight. Still much lighter and probably stiffer/more durable thank stock for sure though.

Tires is another important factor when it comes to feel and comfort. I think you can squeak some 25mm wide tires into the front fork, and the rear has room to spare. A decent pair of performance tires can really make a profound difference I the feel of a bike.
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Huey604 wrote:
May 8th, 2017 2:17 pm
That MEC seatpost is not available in 30.9 diameter, according to their website. Besides from going with a carbon seatpost, I would suggest going with a 27.2 diameter seatpost, to allow for a bit more compliance. You will just need to purchase a shim to adapt the smaller seatpost to the larger seattube opening, which isn't a big deal. I also feel that a $90 seatpost on a sub $600 bike is a bit excessive, unless you have one already. I was planning on buying any cheap eBay carbon seatpost and shim.

Wheels should work though, but I recall those R501s being in the high 1900 gram range for weight. Still much lighter and probably stiffer/more durable thank stock for sure though.

Tires is another important factor when it comes to feel and comfort. I think you can squeak some 25mm wide tires into the front fork, and the rear has room to spare. A decent pair of performance tires can really make a profound difference I the feel of a bike.
+1

the tires are definitely the best single improvement you can make to a bike. I switched to wider 25C high TPI tires and the ride is smooth/quiet and supple, running at a lower PSI (typically 80+).
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does anyone know if costco will sell you an unassembled bike that's still in the box?
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jpwkr1 wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 4:00 pm
I would take similarly priced rim brakes over them any day. If you ride in the rain often however, disk brakes might be the better option.
Rim brakes develop higher torque at much less component loads due to being at larger distance from the wheel axis, but still rubber pads wear fast and often uneven. Not sure why disk brakes are better in the rain though?
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aragingbull wrote:
May 8th, 2017 5:02 pm
does anyone know if costco will sell you an unassembled bike that's still in the box?
Speak to a manager in the 'back' and see if there's overstock in the box. New stock gets assembled in the morning just before the store opens.
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arnycus wrote:
May 8th, 2017 5:20 pm
Rim brakes develop higher torque at much less component loads due to being at larger distance from the wheel axis, but still rubber pads wear fast and often uneven. Not sure why disk brakes are better in the rain though?
Disc brakes are more powerful, are way easier to modulate, and they bite well even with snow and rain. You'd have to try it yourself to feel the difference, but there's really no contest when it comes to stopping power in all weather conditions. The brake pads + slotted rotors works quite more effectively than rubber on an alloy surface.
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People had commented on the Northrock XC29 Mountain Bike earlier.
Setup warning !

Just wanted to give a heads up. I picked this bike up to beat around my rails to trails area.
I gave the bike a once over, checked items were tight inflated ect. but not the chain.
I took it for a light 20km and there is excessive chainring wear. I mean bad it is also evident but not to the same degree on the cassette.
I am taking it back to Costco this morning not sure if I'll get a refund or replacement. But be aware this kind of wear should not happen ! after a light 20km.
I am 6' - 180lbs. The ride was about 90 mins. I assuming the damage was related to a stretched or improperly fit chain ?

Heads-Up
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What kind of wear...? Are you sure it's not the factory stock grooves to aid shifting?

Like so:
Image
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Phils wrote:
Apr 28th, 2017 12:10 pm
I usually pop a minimum of 2 or 3 spokes every season.
On the other hand, I do a lot of riding.

I'm also about 170 lbs.
Are you popping spokes on a bike with disc brakes ? And front or back wheel? ... I was doing some reading about discs vs rim brakes -- interesting about additional stress on spokes from disc brakes...

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