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[Costco] OVE Alice 3-heads LED Lantern Post - $99.97

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  • Sep 25th, 2018 4:36 pm
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May 17, 2009
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[Costco] OVE Alice 3-heads LED Lantern Post - $99.97

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Homedepot.com has it for USD 238

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11 replies
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May 22, 2006
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It doesn't look like you can turn only 1 bulb on - its all three or nothing? The one I currently have that I want to replace has the option to turn on 1 bulb or all three (or maybe it was retrofitted that way by the previous owner)
Sr. Member
Jun 27, 2012
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Are these hard to install?
2010-2018 Winnings = $0 I've entered like a thousand contests and haven't won once.
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Apr 6, 2012
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Home Depot has Canaram brand 3-light post for $149? Is there any big difference in quality in comparison to the one from Home Depot?
Source: Canaram 3-light post
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Mar 5, 2007
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esq05 wrote:
Sep 24th, 2018 4:14 pm
It doesn't look like you can turn only 1 bulb on - its all three or nothing? The one I currently have that I want to replace has the option to turn on 1 bulb or all three (or maybe it was retrofitted that way by the previous owner)
Use Wifi bulbs, can do whatever combination (or colour) you want.
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Saukrates wrote:
Sep 24th, 2018 4:22 pm
Are these hard to install?
In part, that depends on whether you have wiring properly installed already. I installed a pole lamp several years ago. There was no wiring so it involved tapping into existing wiring in the garage; drilling a hole through the garage wall and digging a trench and running the wiring through a conduit buried 18 inches deep to the location of the lamp. Then I poured a little concrete and set bolts into it at the correct spacing to mount the pole lamp. It's a bit of work but nothing super difficult if you have (or can borrow) the tools. YMMV

The most difficult part was drilling through the concrete wall of the garage - you should probably have an electrician connect the wiring. YMMV
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Jr. Member
Jan 8, 2018
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Might not be worth it unless you already have one (and hence the necessary wiring) that you would like to replace. Most people should not be DIYing electrical, and hiring an electrician will almost certainly more than double the cost of this product.
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repatch wrote:
Sep 25th, 2018 11:36 am
Use Wifi bulbs, can do whatever combination (or colour) you want.
I've been weary of using any smart bulbs outside - not sure if they are operable in the extreme cold. I guess if the regular bulbs are, dont see why not.
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Jan 15, 2004
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I bet if you ask a pro to install it, it would be like $1k for the labour. So I agree with the previous poster. Buy it to replace your old one.
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Mar 5, 2007
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esq05 wrote:
Sep 25th, 2018 3:55 pm
I've been weary of using any smart bulbs outside - not sure if they are operable in the extreme cold. I guess if the regular bulbs are, dont see why not.
I'm not sure where this "it's cold, electronics won't work" stuff comes from. I've seen it in many areas, i.e. using Wyzecam WIFI cameras outside.

Does you car function when it's cold? It's got a ton of electronics in it. Yes, they are "designed" for cold, but most of the components are specced very similarly to what's in a regular consumer item.

Most electronics are true solid state. Part of that is they don't really care about temperature (within reason, heat can cause issues if you exceed the thermal budget). Yes, there are certain elements that are affected quite badly by temp, for example batteries are a known issue in extreme cold. Another area are LCD screens stop working (but don't get damaged).

Think about what's in a "smart bulb". It's an LED power supply (small transformer, and IC, some caps, diodes, etc), a WIFI module (SOC type chip, some support components) and a bunch of LEDs. There's nothing there that will be affected by "normal" cold. Only thing I'd be concerned with is whether your WIFI router will reach the pole.
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repatch wrote:
Sep 25th, 2018 4:16 pm
I'm not sure where this "it's cold, electronics won't work" stuff comes from. I've seen it in many areas, i.e. using Wyzecam WIFI cameras outside.

Does you car function when it's cold? It's got a ton of electronics in it. Yes, they are "designed" for cold, but most of the components are specced very similarly to what's in a regular consumer item.

Most electronics are true solid state. Part of that is they don't really care about temperature (within reason, heat can cause issues if you exceed the thermal budget). Yes, there are certain elements that are affected quite badly by temp, for example batteries are a known issue in extreme cold. Another area are LCD screens stop working (but don't get damaged).

Think about what's in a "smart bulb". It's an LED power supply (small transformer, and IC, some caps, diodes, etc), a WIFI module (SOC type chip, some support components) and a bunch of LEDs. There's nothing there that will be affected by "normal" cold. Only thing I'd be concerned with is whether your WIFI router will reach the pole.
I agree. I just never thought it through until I wrote my earlier response lol.

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