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[Costco] Verilux HappyLight Liberty Energy Lamp (Light Therapy) $57

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 6th, 2017 9:47 pm
[OP]
Member
Oct 22, 2001
222 posts
24 upvotes
Toronto

[Costco] Verilux HappyLight Liberty Energy Lamp (Light Therapy) $57

Wife was looking for a light therapy device (ie. the ones you use for boosting energy, treating seasonal affective disorder, etc)

Found this midsize device on Costco.ca's website:
https://www.costco.ca/Verilux-HappyLigh ... 67760.html

From manufacturer's website:
https://verilux.com/store/happylight-li ... herapy-box

Comparable prices for same brand:
Verilux HappyLight Liberty XKS Energy Lamp $80 at Amazon
https://www.amazon.ca/Verilux-HappyLigh ... rty+Energy

HappyLight Liberty Mid-Size Light Therapy Lamp $90 (+ 10% off) at Manufacturer's website
https://verilux.com/store/happylight-li ... herapy-box

Usual Costco benefits
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12 replies
Deal Addict
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Feb 11, 2007
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So it looks like this is a 36W fluorescent light with a CRI of 85 and 6500K temp. Why this over just replacing a light with a 5-10W, CRI85, 5000K LED light and save on electricity and the fixture cost?
Member
Sep 28, 2010
470 posts
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Surrey
Not the best reviews online, and apparently you need a minimum of 10000k? Correct me if I'm wrong...
Deal Guru
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Nov 27, 2005
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Light therapy? Is this the 21st century snake oil?
Jr. Member
Sep 17, 2016
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board123 wrote:
Nov 5th, 2017 10:46 pm
Light therapy? Is this the 21st century snake oil?
Not at all.

Check out this link of a research study done by the University of Siena

https://www.ecnp.eu/Informationandnews/ ... lioli.aspx

The summary of it is that men that were exposed to 30 mins of 10000 lux lighting in the morning exhibited a marked increase in testosterone after a few weeks and also an increase in sexual desire
Jr. Member
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Nov 20, 2016
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Victoria BC
I'm not sure if it's the same model, but they had another full spectrum light in-store last week. I think it was $40. Sadly I forgot to grab one and ended up ordering from Amazon instead. :(
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Mar 30, 2004
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Currently on sale across Alberta (possibly Western Canada) for $12 off regular price. $47.99 before tax.
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Feb 8, 2014
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This says 7500 lux, not the 10,000 recommended lux.
engineered wrote:
Nov 5th, 2017 10:22 pm
So it looks like this is a 36W fluorescent light with a CRI of 85 and 6500K temp. Why this over just replacing a light with a 5-10W, CRI85, 5000K LED light and save on electricity and the fixture cost?
This is a full spectrum light, our circadian rhythm responds to 480/540nm (iirc). Regular bulbs are not optimized for these wavelengths
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
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Quentin5 wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 11:24 am
This says 7500 lux, not the 10,000 recommended lux.
This is a full spectrum light, our circadian rhythm responds to 480/540nm (iirc). Regular bulbs are not optimized for these wavelengths
According to this link, it's a 6500K CFL with CRI85. If it's full spectrum shouldn't it be CRI100?
https://www.homedepot.com/p/36-Watt-Bri ... /205924911

Maybe a grow bulb then? :)
https://www.lowes.ca/led-light-bulbs/fe ... 22258.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full-spectrum_light
"Full-spectrum" is not a technical term when applied to an electrical light bulb but rather a marketing term implying that the product emulates natural light.[1]

Products marketed as "full-spectrum" may produce light throughout the entire spectrum, but actually do not produce an even spectral distribution, and may not even differ substantially from lights not marketed as "full-spectrum".

Color temperature and Color Rendering Index (CRI) are the standards for measuring light. There is no technical definition of "full-spectrum" so it cannot be measured. To compare "full-spectrum" sources requires direct comparison of spectral distributions.
Color of a blackbody

A cube of carbon "C" will radiate light of varying spectral power distribution (SPD) as it is heated. At 0 K, it is pure black, while at about 5,000 K to 5,500 K, it appears similar to noon daylight.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_rendering_index
Light source________________________CCT (K)______CRI
Standard LED Lamp__________________2700-5000___83
Tri-phosphor cool-white fluorescent____4080_________89
High CRI LED Lamp (Blue LED)________2700-5000____95
Ultra High CRI LED Lamp (Violet LED)__2700-5000___98
Incandescent/halogen bulb___________3200________100
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I came across this site, which is against the costco Verlilux lights.
http://portlandpsychotherapyclinic.com/ ... nd-costco/
Don’t be fooled. Costco continues to sell the Verilux light above, but with a new name. The box for the new light says it’s a bit brighter, but still needs to be 6 inches from your eyes to work. That’s an impractical distance for most people. Don’t buy it. The new name for the questionable device is the “Verilux Happylight Liberty.” Given the poor track record of this company, I’d consider this new device similarly questionable. Avoid it.

That said, the item posted by the OP seems to be improved with 10K lumens, though the manual still says 6 inches is ideal.
The HappyLight Energy Lamp should be positioned as close as six inches, but within 24 inches of your face and should be slightly off-center. (See diagram.)
Note:Do not look directly into the lamp

https://verilux.com/sites/default/files ... manual.pdf
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Sep 17, 2016
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The unit has two interchangable lenses: a softer one that gives a maximum of 7500 lux and a high energy one that claims a maximum of 10000 lux
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Feb 8, 2014
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@engineered
The basic idea is its supposed to simulate sunlight by hitting the right wavelengths. Full spectrum is not necessarily 100CRI and 100CRI is not full spectrum, they are different concepts. Your correct there is no formal definition, but typically a light recommended for SAD or circadian rhythm disorders will hit the proper 480nm peaks that the Melanopsin in our eyes use to set our body clocks. You can also get blue LED lights that are supposed to be just as effective.
All that said 10000 lux full spectrum is what is recommended and the 6 inches is ludicrous and a lamp to avoid, 10K lux at 24 inches is more reasonable. Some of the LED lights have a narrow field of light to compensate for their low power and typical good SAD/Circadian lamps cost $150-200 though one can find cheaper. I also dislike CFL because the bulbs are not as long lasting as typically claimed and are expensive to replace.
In the end our circadian rhythm is set by a slightly darker blue then a blue sky and sunlight/blue sky is more then good enough unless you have a circadian rhythm disorder (or your sleep doctor is anal and insists you use a SAD lamp).
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts

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