Personal Finance

Courier brokerage fee using credit card...

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  • Sep 15th, 2014 5:28 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Aug 8, 2012
87 posts
109 upvotes
Vancouver

Courier brokerage fee using credit card...

Hello wise people of RFD,

I know these courier brokerage fees are notorious for the cost and collect-on-delivery method.

Recently I've received a package valued at $40 and was charged around $15 brokerage for it by the infamous UP*. What's interesting is that when I used my credit card to pay the U*S delivery driver for the fee, instead of pulling out a wireless Interact receiver, he wrote down my card info (number, expiry date, and card holder name) on a paper form. Being a paranoid bastard that I am, I asked and he simply told me "this is the way it is"...

Unsatisfied and in fear of losing my credit card info to strangers, I later called UP* about what their SOP is for receiving payment on delivery. They told me the standard protocol is to use the electronic Interact receiver, for obvious security reasons: card holder info remains more protected from drivers, and UP* can verify the payment on the spot. Only when I brought up how this driver used pen and paper did the customer service rep started to get a bit nervous about it... trying to make up by saying "oh sometimes it happens that they write down the info because they don't have the machine" (no *****, right?)

Is this something I should be concerned about? As careful as I am about this, I accept that if my card info were to leak out, there are lots of ways for that to happen. But this happened right in front of me. He just wrote everything down, with no receipt whatsoever. I checked what he wrote down and no he didn't include the security code. But that's a 3 to 4-digit number that can be easily memorized. This means I need to closely monitor my account for the next few months to year till my card expires.

What do you guys think? Should I call bank and have them send me a new card?
13 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 23, 2003
1432 posts
183 upvotes
I would call your credit card company and make them aware of what happened and let them make the decision to issue a new card as I doubt they will want to. I wouldn't worry too much just sounds like a lazy (and not so smart) UPS driver. But monitor your statements regardless like you should be doing even if this didn't happen.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 18, 2005
18531 posts
3167 upvotes
GTA West
I would not worry about it unless fraud actually happens.

This raises an interesting question though. He's got your complete address and credit card information. It would certainly make it easy for him to open an amazon account in your name and address, buy stuff, and then when it ships by UPS ... well you won't be receiving it! :lol:

In your situation, I would just watch my statements in case anything weird comes up.

Next time write him a cheque or call UPS in advance and give them the information over the phone.
What if there were no hypothetical questions?
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 8, 2012
87 posts
109 upvotes
Vancouver
Jucius Maximus wrote:
Sep 11th, 2014 7:35 pm
I would not worry about it unless fraud actually happens.

This raises an interesting question though. He's got your complete address and credit card information. It would certainly make it easy for him to open an amazon account in your name and address, buy stuff, and then when it ships by UPS ... well you won't be receiving it! :lol:

In your situation, I would just watch my statements in case anything weird comes up.

Next time write him a cheque or call UPS in advance and give them the information over the phone.
That's exactly what I am concerned about... the guy simply has way more info than he should and he can ever so easily buy stuff online, months down the road, just small purchases that could fly past me... While I'm in the habit to check my statements regularly, I'd hate to have to monitor it so closely to ensure fidelity.

Called the bank and they said I have a valid reason to be concerned of. They even suggested to replace with a new card. I think that might be the easiest way out of this predicament. But if I do that, I don't think the brokerage fee they charged will stick. Do you think that could be a problem?

It was a family member who made the purchase. I was just the lucky one to answer the door. Cheque would've been the best option here, if the fee is to be paid. This experience just adds to my long list of gripes with this courier.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 18, 2005
18531 posts
3167 upvotes
GTA West
mikuo0628 wrote:
Sep 11th, 2014 8:10 pm
That's exactly what I am concerned about... the guy simply has way more info than he should and he can ever so easily buy stuff online, months down the road, just small purchases that could fly past me... While I'm in the habit to check my statements regularly, I'd hate to have to monitor it so closely to ensure fidelity.

Called the bank and they said I have a valid reason to be concerned of. They even suggested to replace with a new card. I think that might be the easiest way out of this predicament. But if I do that, I don't think the brokerage fee they charged will stick. Do you think that could be a problem?

It was a family member who made the purchase. I was just the lucky one to answer the door. Cheque would've been the best option here, if the fee is to be paid. This experience just adds to my long list of gripes with this courier.
1. If the bank wants to do the card replacement, then go ahead and do it. If there is any problem with processing the brokerage fee, then call UPS and give them the new card info. Don't forget to update your info with any other pre-authorized payments.

2. Due to the large amount of data breaches and fraud in general, all people should be carefully watching their accounts at all times!
What if there were no hypothetical questions?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 3, 2006
8145 posts
3223 upvotes
Markham
In that case I would refuse the package on the spot, let them retry. Before the next retry, call UPS and let them process the card via phone first, then guy will drop the package. At least it's not on a piece of paper lying around.

Or you can try clearing the package yourself: http://trueler.com/2010/11/24/self-clea ... erage-fee/
Jr. Member
Oct 9, 2011
110 posts
17 upvotes
ToniCipriani wrote:
Sep 11th, 2014 8:53 pm
In that case I would refuse the package on the spot, let them retry. Before the next retry, call UPS and let them process the card via phone first, then guy will drop the package. At least it's not on a piece of paper lying around.

Or you can try clearing the package yourself: http://trueler.com/2010/11/24/self-clea ... erage-fee/
Just to give you guys a heads up.. I drive for UPS, we can't do anything with your credit card number when we write it down because we do not take the 3 digit security code off the back. completely safe to do
Jr. Member
Oct 9, 2011
110 posts
17 upvotes
hey guys, I drive for UPS. It's safe, when we write it down, we do not take the 3 digit security code on the back of the card.
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 8, 2012
87 posts
109 upvotes
Vancouver
timach wrote:
Sep 11th, 2014 9:19 pm
hey guys, I drive for UPS. It's safe, when we write it down, we do not take the 3 digit security code on the back of the card.
Well... since you put it that way. :)

timach, I have no reason to doubt your integrity. But you are speaking for a large number of people. Can you really make that bold claim?

And yes, I did notice that the security code not written down when I check the paper; I mentioned it in my first post. Everything else was written down. Just to throw it out there, how easy is it to memorize a 3-digit number?

Perhaps you can help with this question though: why pen and paper? Customer service rep told me SOP is wireless Interact. This is the first time I've had any courier writing down my card for any reason. That struck me as odd.

But anyway, thank you for your input. My post was not intended to attack anyone or company, but just asking for advice for measures I can take to ease me of my concern. Wouldn't you agree that my concern is valid?
Jr. Member
Oct 9, 2011
110 posts
17 upvotes
mikuo0628 wrote:
Sep 12th, 2014 12:26 pm
Just to throw it out there, how easy is it to memorize a 3-digit number?

P
I can't speak for every driver, but me, I don't not even flip the card over to get that 3 digit number. And besides, If you have some charges to your account that you didn't make, I think it could all come back to that driver. But yes, or computers you sign your name on can do a lot, I don't get why we can't charge peoples credit/debit card on there yet.
Deal Addict
Mar 2, 2005
2022 posts
316 upvotes
OP - I think you are being paranoid, as someone who travels a fair bit for work, I have come across this many times, in cabs, at retail stores etc... Point is yes, your credit card information can be stolen that way, but it can also be stolen many other ways which are just as easy.

We have to be proactive and keep a watchful eye on our statements and credit bureau reports, that's all we can do.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 3, 2006
8145 posts
3223 upvotes
Markham
But you do take the expiry date as well for sure. Number and expiry date, already a lot of damage can be done.
Member
Sep 4, 2010
374 posts
34 upvotes
There are plenty of websites that can process transactions without the 3-4 digit security code.

That said, I would just monitor your statements. If you see unusual activity, then report it. If you're really worried, wait until the UPS fee is posted, then ask for a new card #.
Newbie
Apr 23, 2006
28 posts
2 upvotes
I work for Fedex and we do the same thing. Its very embarrasing that we can get a package around the world overnight but I have to manually write down your credit card number. If it makes you feel any better we are all bonded, and 2 years ago the technology didnt even exist for us to process it at your door.

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