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Criteria for choosing University

[OP]
Member
Nov 11, 2003
214 posts
22 upvotes
Calgary, AB

Criteria for choosing University

What kind of criteria did you use for choosing a university? Programs you like, history, location, cost, reputation, etc.?
Aaron
20 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 9, 2005
2986 posts
3 upvotes
Vancouver
Location, program, and friends. :)
Deal Fanatic
Aug 27, 2004
6743 posts
295 upvotes
Toronto, ON
MooG wrote:What kind of criteria did you use for choosing a university? Programs you like, history, location, cost, reputation, etc.?
Aaron
Location, reputation, etc...
Member
Jul 27, 2005
237 posts
For myself,

Program, Residence Quality, Food, and Cost.

I'm going to Queen's for Life Science and Concurrent Education ('09, and '10).
Jr. Member
Nov 4, 2003
177 posts
1 upvote
Reputation, employment oppertunities (co-op), location
Newbie
Mar 16, 2005
32 posts
Program, Reputation, Atmosphere

Some would say friends, but it's not really a factor for me. It's nice knowing people going to the same school, but you'll be making a ton of new friends anyways. If you have friends going, you'll have a tendency to hang out with them and as a result, you'll meet less people.
/ / a g i l i t i z e d . c o m
Sr. Member
Apr 16, 2002
829 posts
23 upvotes
Toronto
program, reputation and quality of education.

--Mark
Member
Nov 7, 2003
252 posts
Basically it is not always the school or it's program or reputation that is important... If you asked me to choose another school, I would choose a school with a co-op option. Although I went to U of T which offers a 16 month PEY program to any student with 2.0CGPA, I didn't choose a program that needed "co-op experience". Usually, people from engineering and comp-sci enters PEY, sometimes you see other majors go into PEY too, but I would prob say that 1/2 the PEY candidates are from engineering.

Anyways, I have found that most people who entered a program (of their choice) usually will end up working in the same field when they graduate if they had taken a co-op program.

And although most people seek reputation... usually a school's reputation arrives not from the quality of their undergrad programs, but rather from the quality of research. I believe some ranking even take into account of the number of professors and scholars in the school who have received a noble prize.

A lot of people seek marketability when choosing a program. It seems odd, but a lot of programs that people think is marketable, really isn't. A lot of people enter life-sci thinking that they can become a doctor or dentist (which are marketable trades), but I'll say 90% of life-sci grads either switch to another field or end up in some sort of lab making $25K a year. A unionized brick layer, or cement truck driver makes a lot more than that.
Trying is the first step towards failure
--Homer Simpson
Member
Jul 27, 2005
237 posts
xien0n wrote:Reputation, employment oppertunities (co-op), location
Something of interest, that's little known, is the employment rate. It's published usually by the University that describes the percentage of graduates who are employed within 6months, after a yr, etc. It's required by OSAP that they published these data.

Ask the registrar for them if you can't find them online. (I know queen's is under "Databook" or something like that).
Newbie
Aug 19, 2005
76 posts
Toronto
Im going into grade 12 and most of friends are planning to go to Uoft @ St.George for Life science but i'm deciding to go to scarborough for my undergrad. That means that i have no friends when i get into univ. Is this recommended because i will probably be going solo for a couple of weeks struggling on some course material. :|
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Jul 5, 2005
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xmate wrote:Im going into grade 12 and most of friends are planning to go to Uoft @ St.George for Life science but i'm deciding to go to scarborough for my undergrad. That means that i have no friends when i get into univ. Is this recommended because i will probably be going solo for a couple of weeks struggling on some course material. :|
You'll meet new friends. Don't sweat it and don't let your friends hold you back from where you want to go.
Sr. Member
Nov 23, 2004
555 posts
35 upvotes
I picked based on:
Program, reputation (professionally, not by the general public) and location

I don't think friends should be a consideration for university since you'll meet so many other people anyways. My group of close friends completely split up when going to university, so how we all have our school friends but still hang out together. I think the best way to really experience university life is to go with no one else and throw yourself into a situation where you have to meet new people. That's what it's all about!

I think program should probably be the top priority. Fact is, if you hate what you're studying or even the core curriculum of the program you're in, you probably won't do well and you'll have a terrible undergrad experience. Find something that fits well with you.

Reputation is a funny thing. I find that the general public has strong opinions/assumptions about schools that may or may not agree with those actually in the field in question. To me, the reputation of the working/professional world is more important. This, of course, will vary from faculty to faculty. For example, I find a lot of people seem to look down at health sciences at McMaster, or McMaster in general (e.g. assume you didn't get into a "better" school). However, McMaster is extremely well known in the professional world, especially in health sciences because of the use of evidence based analysis and problem based learning. I find that odd, but then again, I'll pay attention to the opinion of the field I'm interested in rather than the general public.

Location is important because you have to decide how far away from home you want to live. I think all university students should live away from home. You become more independent and learn how to take care of yourself. Not to mention, it's way more fun. Being far enough away to move out but close enough to home for convenience is probably a good balance.
Sr. Member
Jun 6, 2005
525 posts
I just stayed at home to go to school.

Good university, one of the top astronomy programs in the country, the biggest telescope in the country is in the city, cheap, all my friends go there. It was a pretty easy decision.
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Jul 7, 2005
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Mississauga
Final Lazy wrote:Basically it is not always the school or it's program or reputation that is important... If you asked me to choose another school, I would choose a school with a co-op option. Although I went to U of T which offers a 16 month PEY program to any student with 2.0CGPA, I didn't choose a program that needed "co-op experience". Usually, people from engineering and comp-sci enters PEY, sometimes you see other majors go into PEY too, but I would prob say that 1/2 the PEY candidates are from engineering.

Anyways, I have found that most people who entered a program (of their choice) usually will end up working in the same field when they graduate if they had taken a co-op program.

And although most people seek reputation... usually a school's reputation arrives not from the quality of their undergrad programs, but rather from the quality of research. I believe some ranking even take into account of the number of professors and scholars in the school who have received a noble prize.

A lot of people seek marketability when choosing a program. It seems odd, but a lot of programs that people think is marketable, really isn't. A lot of people enter life-sci thinking that they can become a doctor or dentist (which are marketable trades), but I'll say 90% of life-sci grads either switch to another field or end up in some sort of lab making $25K a year. A unionized brick layer, or cement truck driver makes a lot more than that.
true...........completely agree...............you should most importantly look at the program and location.

most people enter life-sci because they are told/conditioned to think they want to be doctors/dentists by parents/relatives...............when they get there and get a feel of the material and more exposure to the field they back out.

Don't become a doctor to become rich/prestigious.............but become one to help people out.

I know I might have gone off topic.................couldn't help myself after reading how life-sci students usually switch. and it is true that in many circumstances you can make more money doing a blue collar job than a white collar job in a lab. getting an AZ licence and driving a rig will get you almost 80-100k with a good company with overtime and bonuses. something to consider................just kidding.......nothing beats education. but do choose a program 'you' actually want to learn and not what someone else wants you to learn.

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