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  • Jul 23rd, 2008 4:25 pm
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Sr. Member
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Jan 3, 2006
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I think all the pictures in the box mall are pretty bad, but that's just me...
The first few were much better, and as stated, just work on some small things, moving around the cars, etc etc
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Mar 1, 2004
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As most have said, the pictures are too confusing. There are too many things in focus and nothing draws the eye to it. It would seem that you are trying to "force" a picture rather than letting it happen. I shoot when inspired, which makes for some awesome photos.

The cars in the empty parking lot are nice, reminds you of when you are about to get in your car (that you really like) and drive away. Nothing distracting in the background.

The other pictures just have too much in focus and looks confusing, as you don't know what the picture is trying to say. The blown out store lighting is distracting, big time. Try a long exposure just after civil twilight ends and "paint" the car with a flashlight. Wherever you shine the light will illuminate and look like you had lights on the car when you didn't. So if you properly exposed the entire car, you could eliminate the shadows (inside grill, wheel wells etc) using this method. The pictures will look eerie as you mind freaks out because you know from the amount of surrounding lighting, you should see shadows, where there aren't any.

The nifty fifty is a must have and can de-focus the background very well (bokeh).
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TurboRegal wrote:
Jul 14th, 2008 9:18 pm
I think all the pictures in the box mall are pretty bad, but that's just me...
The first few were much better, and as stated, just work on some small things, moving around the cars, etc etc
yeah the mall one were pretty bad; I was just figuring out how to change the exposure and the camera yeah; that was the result.
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AudiDude wrote:
Jul 14th, 2008 9:30 pm
As most have said, the pictures are too confusing. There are too many things in focus and nothing draws the eye to it. It would seem that you are trying to "force" a picture rather than letting it happen. I shoot when inspired, which makes for some awesome photos.

The cars in the empty parking lot are nice, reminds you of when you are about to get in your car (that you really like) and drive away. Nothing distracting in the background.

The other pictures just have too much in focus and looks confusing, as you don't know what the picture is trying to say. The blown out store lighting is distracting, big time. Try a long exposure just after civil twilight ends and "paint" the car with a flashlight. Wherever you shine the light will illuminate and look like you had lights on the car when you didn't. So if you properly exposed the entire car, you could eliminate the shadows (inside grill, wheel wells etc) using this method. The pictures will look eerie as you mind freaks out because you know from the amount of surrounding lighting, you should see shadows, where there aren't any.

The nifty fifty is a must have and can de-focus the background very well (bokeh).
Thanks for the advice; only thing is what exposure should I do this on? I use the 30 second exposure but it ends up blowing out all other lights (like the store lights). So set it at 30 second exposure and just point the flash light over the vehicle? Will give this a try. I will definately pick up the nifty fifty sometime; the problem with the kit lens is that it picks up too much.

I'll remember next time to check the background to make sure it is free of stuff. The second set of pictures are horrible; my first attempt at pitch dark shots.

I have messed with HDR but am still partial to it (creates awseome details in the sky though but too much noise):

[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/rfdhdr2.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/rfdhdr.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/Photoshoot/2.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/Photoshoot/1.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/Photoshoot/5.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/Photoshoot/6.jpg[/IMG]

^^yeah; Still too much stuff in the background...

Got alot of feedback; thanks for being honest and critical guys. I will practice some more and hopefully by the end of summer I wil produce some decent pics.
Sr. Member
Jul 19, 2003
731 posts
4 upvotes
Im on the way out so im going to get straight to the point sorry if I sound harsh

1. lose the borders, its just silly
2. you dont need an IS lens, learn how to 'breath and hold your camera against your body
3. work on composition
4. you want our eyes to jump to the 'interestingness of your photo
5. lay off the heavy pp

other wise great pics, keep it up :)
don't forget to neuter your pet
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Sl300 wrote:
Jul 15th, 2008 12:15 am
Im on the way out so im going to get straight to the point sorry if I sound harsh

1. lose the borders, its just silly
2. you dont need an IS lens, learn how to 'breath and hold your camera against your body
3. work on composition
4. you want our eyes to jump to the 'interestingness of your photo
5. lay off the heavy pp

other wise great pics, keep it up :)
No problem; thanks for the honest advice. I am a newbie to dSLR or even modern cameras; so I definately have alot to learn.
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Oct 1, 2003
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In my opinion, your first post of photos aren't very good based on bad composition. It looks like you were trying but I don't think any of the photos are bang on.

In many of your photos the horizon line is slanted, and it doesn't seem like it's enough of a slant to be a style thing with the exception of the breakdancer image. I can tell that some of the photos with the docking bays in the background, that the actual road surface slants so that photo is technically straight but still it doesn't look straight. You need to be aware of stuff like this when taking the photo.

Also, your subject matter - I suggest trying to try and do it in an interesting way. You can try taking tight close ups, which you have done with some of the G35 photos. But go further, take close ups of the details of the car, try being more abstract with the shaps and lines of the cars. Find more interesting clean backgrounds, which it looks like you are trying to do, but trying to make a G35 look sexy with townhomes in the backgound doesn't really work for me. Try taking photos of the cars in motion, that could give you some interesting results. Also, try playing with light and reflection. Try and be more creative with your subject matter - play with it and have fun with it. Don't just take a flat picture of it.

Try and think what is the purpose of my photo and who am I taking it for?

Take a look at http://www.topgear.com/ for some inspiration maybe, see what works in terms of framing cars, what backgrounds work, what angles work.
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Nov 17, 2003
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First, and most importantly - thanks for posting your pictures for comments and criticism. This is what this forum is SUPPOSED to be for! Seeing the first page packed with the exact same "I'm too lazy to read a single review so what camera should I buy for $300" thread over and over again is giving me a headache.

Second, your pictures:

Always use the tripod. Also, don't fire the camera with the shutter. Use the timer or a remote to activate the shutter.

Try shooting in A mode. Set your aperture to f6-f8. Most lenses are sharpest around f8 or so. A bit of trial and error here is good.

Make sure the horizon is level in your pictures, unless you're going for a dramatic angle.

Keep shooting in the underground lot! It's a nice location. Lose the suburban/big box hell type locations - they're as unappealing as can possibly be.

Change up your eye level now and then. Try bringing a tarp and a small ladder with you next time, and take a few shots lying down or from the top of the ladder

Change up the lighting at night - pick up a couple of those big emergency 12v floodlights from crappy tire and "paint' the cars with light.


Most important - keep practicing! As long as you're having fun with it it's worth doing.
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jb22 wrote:
Jul 15th, 2008 3:43 am
In my opinion, your first post of photos aren't very good based on bad composition. It looks like you were trying but I don't think any of the photos are bang on.

In many of your photos the horizon line is slanted, and it doesn't seem like it's enough of a slant to be a style thing with the exception of the breakdancer image. I can tell that some of the photos with the docking bays in the background, that the actual road surface slants so that photo is technically straight but still it doesn't look straight. You need to be aware of stuff like this when taking the photo.

Also, your subject matter - I suggest trying to try and do it in an interesting way. You can try taking tight close ups, which you have done with some of the G35 photos. But go further, take close ups of the details of the car, try being more abstract with the shaps and lines of the cars. Find more interesting clean backgrounds, which it looks like you are trying to do, but trying to make a G35 look sexy with townhomes in the backgound doesn't really work for me. Try taking photos of the cars in motion, that could give you some interesting results. Also, try playing with light and reflection. Try and be more creative with your subject matter - play with it and have fun with it. Don't just take a flat picture of it.

Try and think what is the purpose of my photo and who am I taking it for?

Take a look at http://www.topgear.com/ for some inspiration maybe, see what works in terms of framing cars, what backgrounds work, what angles work.
Thanks for the advice; noted. I am going to be doing a photoshoot this weekend and will tryo to emphasize your points.
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rubberband wrote:
Jul 15th, 2008 8:24 am
First, and most importantly - thanks for posting your pictures for comments and criticism. This is what this forum is SUPPOSED to be for! Seeing the first page packed with the exact same "I'm too lazy to read a single review so what camera should I buy for $300" thread over and over again is giving me a headache.

Second, your pictures:

Always use the tripod. Also, don't fire the camera with the shutter. Use the timer or a remote to activate the shutter.

Try shooting in A mode. Set your aperture to f6-f8. Most lenses are sharpest around f8 or so. A bit of trial and error here is good.

Make sure the horizon is level in your pictures, unless you're going for a dramatic angle.

Keep shooting in the underground lot! It's a nice location. Lose the suburban/big box hell type locations - they're as unappealing as can possibly be.

Change up your eye level now and then. Try bringing a tarp and a small ladder with you next time, and take a few shots lying down or from the top of the ladder

Change up the lighting at night - pick up a couple of those big emergency 12v floodlights from crappy tire and "paint' the cars with light.


Most important - keep practicing! As long as you're having fun with it it's worth doing.
No problem. I really appreciate the feedback. Up until now most of my friends have thought the pictures were great; but I think it is probably because they think a dSLR = great pictures. I realize I have alot of work ahead of me and am starting to understand why my pictures were subpar. Best way to learn instead of me continuing my pictures like this; haha.

I will go for a quick drive tommorow and try to take some more pics. I thought this one looked alright; but is it still too busy?

[IMG]http://imusion.net/asad/Canon/Photoshoot/4.jpg[/IMG]

The houses kinda pulls my focus along with the stores; guess I will be buying the 50mm this weekend :cheesygri .
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Nov 17, 2003
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The angle on the new one is better. Good idea. I'd still prefer it in a location without the houses/store/etc. THe parking garage is money.

Another advantage to the garage is how plain it is - it's a shame to have your car (nicely, btw!) detailed and have a loading dock reflected in the paint. :)
Member
May 27, 2007
288 posts
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New Westminster
I'm just a beginner, but what I found is that what's in the background is just as important as your subject.
For example, in the picture above, if you had the ocean, a city night view, or trees instead of houses and a green dumpster, it would be much more appealing.
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The set of 6 photos, that preceded the one you just posted has way too many distracting elements.

The one with the red pole is in the foreground while your car is in the background. Its color is red and distracts away from the photo.

I think the problem here that needs to be learned is to eliminate distracting elements from your photo.

When shooting a subject, you have to think about how you can best emphasize your subject... Through blurring it out in the background via your lens, or cropping it out entirely. Also color. Your car is grey, a very subtle color shade. You need to find a setting where there are very little hard contrasting colors so the grey will stand out.
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Aug 17, 2005
289 posts
what aperature are you using on these pics? it seems like your straddling the middle, so your not getting the bokeh effect with a shallow DOF, but you're also not getting the entire subject in focus with a deeper DOF.

the last pic you posted is evidence of it. you have the car in both the foreground and it carries deeper into the photo, but it doesn't seem the full subject is in focus. try using a smaller aperature and make sure to use a tripod. if you have a remote trigger, use that, else use the timer mode to let your camera set off the picture for you. sometimes you can move the camera as you depress the shutter.
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If you are still using a kit lens, but like the focal length, investigate the Tamron AF17-50mm F/2.8 Di-II LD Aspherical. The 18-55 is not going to help your bokeh very much. The nifty fifty will require more work, but it can be used and it kicks @$$ with indoor low lighting situations. You will need to learn at which aperature the 50mm 1.8 will blur what amount of the shot and in what pattern. Most people that get this lens have difficulty because they attempt to shoot everything at f 1.8 and the lens is usable from f 2.0 -2.8 and up for what you are doing.

For example shooting a fish in a tank at 1.8 if the fish is turning away from you will yield a picture where only the middle of the fish (which is closest to you ) is in focus, while the rest is blurry and dark. Change the aperture to 2.8 at the same distance and now the whole fish is in focus and not blurry. Increase the size of the fish to cover the width of the frame and now you need f 4.0 to get the whole fish into focus again.

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