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  • Oct 13th, 2017 6:57 pm
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Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4548 posts
253 upvotes
I'm my experience, with non life threatening needs for MRIs, the stress of wondering what's wrong/what if is enough to give you mental distress if you have to wait long enough. If I ever have to wait longer than three months again, I'm paying out of pocket and making a day trip to Buffalo.
Deal Addict
Feb 7, 2017
1972 posts
1026 upvotes
te1648 wrote:
Sep 19th, 2017 12:31 pm

X-rays are the most common and widely available diagnostic imaging technique. Even if a patient may need a more sophisticated test, they will often receive an X-ray first. When the rays pass through the body, dense objects—such as bones—appear white on the film. X-rays are typically used to view and diagnose bone disease, degeneration, fractures, dislocations, infections and tumors.

In your head injury case, a CT scan may prove beneficial. A CT scan uses a series of X-rays to create a detailed view of the brain. A CT scan can quickly visualize fractures and uncover evidence of bleeding in the brain (hemorrhage), blood clots, bruised brain tissue (contusions) and brain tissue swelling. Meanwhile, CT scans can expose you to as much radiation as 200 chest X-rays.
⬆ This
And this ⬇
AndySixx wrote:
Sep 19th, 2017 10:42 am
Canadian system -> reactionary, infrastructure based on need.
American system -> excessive expenses (thus overkill on assets), pass that cost along to insurers and government (thus the patient).

As an American myself, the fact that their wait times are shorter doesn't make the system any better. The Canadian system is a lot more fiscally responsible and more aimed at long term sustainability.

Anyways, I had a MRI on my lower back done, after fracturing L5/S1, at Calgary SHC. Wait time was 3 weeks. Wasn't going to die, so I don't see how this is outrageous.
If its an Emergency or Urgent to your diagnosis then diagnostic tools like Ultrasounds - X-rays - MRIs - and CT Scans are ALWAYS available.

As is the case in Canada, those with the most need get seen first.

This is WHY you hear people b!tch about Cdn Healthcare, a certain percentage of the population believes their issues are greater than anyone else's... That is why MRI appointments are cancelled, and Elective Surgeries are postponed... The unpredictable happens. Hospitals just cannot predict when the need will be the greatest.

Example, a relative fell & broke a bone during a snowstorm here in Ontario. They arrived at the hospital and were seen in a relatively short amount of time (pain & swelling factor) putting them ahead of those who had come in with say the stomach flu. X-rays were ordered. Wait time about 1 hour. Results discussed. Operation recommended. It was nightime, so no regular ortho OR. They were then scheduled to be put in a cast. Wait time about 1 hour. Surgery could not be done until the next day (it was now around midnight). In the meantime hospital was filling up with more falls & accident victims. Relative was considered not an emergency, but still requiring urgent care. Hospital was recommending that they not go home ... But stay overnight. But there were no ward beds available (any space that was had been filled with more urgent cases that had come in / or the shuffle that resulted) Relative was made comfy in a bed in Emerg. Op was scheduled for "sometime" the next day. Snowstorm continued. More people came into the ER all thru the night & morning rush hour. The relative got their operation that day, but it actually happened end of day as they had been seen, we're comfy, and orthopedics was busy with an assortment of Emergencies (Car Accident victims) and their regular load of scheduled surgeries. Relative was treated well throughout. Surgery was a success. And they were home within 40 Hours of showing up at Emerg.

Cdn healthcare may not be perfect. But it is good for the most part. Still prefer it over the American model. Relative also got 6 months of follow up care & Physio... All for the same low price. Smiling Face With Open Mouth
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2006
6817 posts
997 upvotes
The bigger picture too is if you think CT/MRI access is bad, you should see how bad our emergency care is in comparsion to the rest of the world, we are usually at the bottom of when surveyed.
http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/column ... -the-worst

I don't understand too why when we talk about health care changes, the US is usually brought up as an example of failure and people say, "We don't want to be like the US."

Yeah, no kidding, we want to aim higher and be like the other G7 countries which they are not fully public like Canada or mostly private like US, either.
The Devil made me buy it - RFD. :twisted:
[OP]
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User avatar
Dec 13, 2016
1045 posts
793 upvotes
hdom wrote:
Sep 29th, 2017 8:19 pm
The bigger picture too is if you think CT/MRI access is bad, you should see how bad our emergency care is in comparsion to the rest of the world, we are usually at the bottom of when surveyed.
http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/column ... -the-worst

I don't understand too why when we talk about health care changes, the US is usually brought up as an example of failure and people say, "We don't want to be like the US."

Yeah, no kidding, we want to aim higher and be like the other G7 countries which they are not fully public like Canada or mostly private like US, either.
Bit late to this, but thanks for that.

I would like to see how each province ranks, as I am sure some of them are dragging down the Canadian average. I specifically have Quebec in mind considering Montreal is the second largest city.
Sr. Member
Oct 6, 2015
884 posts
433 upvotes
My understanding is that the machines themselves aren't that much money. Sure, a few million dollars seems like a lot of money, but once you amortize it over the number of procedures performed, using a reasonable cost of capital, its not.

However, the problem is the very expensive healthcare workers that have to 'run' the machines. Radiologists, who have to 'read' each report, cost a million bucks a year or more. The cost of the healthcare staff by far exceeds the cost of buying and installing the MRI and CT machines themselves.

If Canada was serious about increasing access to these machines, they'd be running 24/7/365 clinics with them and scheduling patients around the clock. But when hospitals segment out the costs, they are forced to limit procedures as a way of limiting their payroll compensation.

So the number of MRI's available is irrelevant until they're fully utilized. And in Canada, they're clearly not. The US is quite a bit more spread out, so there's going to be more MRI machines owing simply to that fact alone. They probably suffer low utilization rates as well.
Member
Jul 31, 2017
311 posts
48 upvotes
My CT Scan was done in less than an hour. However, the nurse that got it prescribed may have gotten into trouble for it as she treated me "badly" after every time I saw her after. Badly, meaning... whatever I came in with, she was trying to get me to go elsewhere. That is my opinion for right or wrong.

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