Fashion & Apparel

Dealing with Show Offs

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 16th, 2017 9:11 pm
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Oct 13, 2009
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Does having hipster boots, sick fadez, slight stubble and city and colour on your iPhone playlist qualify you as a hipster?
Firebolt wrote:
Feb 12th, 2016 1:09 pm
give lots of head for sick knee fadez, give lots of lap dances for ca$h wallet fades. Always pop that leg when kissing for dope honey combs, knee lots of mans in the crotch for killer whiskers, low ride like an og for them stacks. And traintracks? Only achievable by a legend in the denim game
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nasa25 wrote:
Mar 31st, 2017 8:53 pm
Does having hipster boots, sick fadez, slight stubble and city and colour on your iPhone playlist qualify you as a hipster?
Only if you wear frames without lenses.
Just because you can doesn't mean you should.
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Aethean wrote:
Apr 2nd, 2017 2:15 pm
Only if you wear frames without lenses.
Btw really loving that avatar pic.
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Sanyo wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 9:00 pm
I laugh when I see women with LV purses -- how many of them have a stock portfolio? More like a credit card portfolio amirite??!?! :)
You really think women in the GTA need a credit card debt to buy LV? Your kidding right? For every purse they have, there's a property to go with it.
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greg123 wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2017 10:08 am
You really think women in the GTA need a credit card debt to buy LV? Your kidding right? For every purse they have, there's a property to go with it.
Hmm many of them do trust me. I worked at a bank, many of them came in with their expensive purses but had virtually nothing to their names. Sometimes its someone else funding it

Its called keeping up with the Joneses... many of them look rich but are not...
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Sanyo wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2017 7:20 pm
Hmm many of them do trust me. I worked at a bank, many of them came in with their expensive purses but had virtually nothing to their names. Sometimes its someone else funding it

Its called keeping up with the Joneses... many of them look rich but are not...
Not everyone necessarily has all their wealth and savings in the account at the bank you happened to be working at. Just saying.

You probably don't know why some may look poor...because you can't know. Real estate millionaires are just one part of the puzzle, but it's one of the most obvious. How many Canadians work for American companies and get paid in American dollars? Are you going to look into the remnants of their Canadian bank account and decide they are poor, too? :facepalm:

There ARE a lot of poor, indebted Canadians in the GTA or GVA...but trust me, there are also many truly rich (I'm not saying I am, but I can definitely afford some dinky Chanels on my professional salary that you guys think are ridiculous and stupid. Give it 10 years, and I would probably be able to sell each of them for more than the Toyota I drive. I already sold my Hermes. So I like flashy bags and I don't like flashy cars...what kind of a show-off am I?)

All these accusations of people keepin' up with the Joneses is tiresome, it reveals the bitter accusers more than shedding light on the truth. Lots of people are richer than outsiders would realize, and they would know why, and how...if they were part of the club. It's not a secret, exclusive club, either...it's actually become common.

Some made it almost completely on their own...others maybe inherited most of it. A lot of people have some part of both equations. Either way, almost no one accomplished everything they've accomplished on their own, even if some want to claim it. Again, if it makes a huge difference in how you feel, that's mostly your problem. See how far it gets you...
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peanutz wrote:
Apr 4th, 2017 5:42 pm
Not everyone necessarily has all their wealth and savings in the account at the bank you happened to be working at. Just saying.

You probably don't know why some may look poor...because you can't know. Real estate millionaires are just one part of the puzzle, but it's one of the most obvious. How many Canadians work for American companies and get paid in American dollars? Are you going to look into the remnants of their Canadian bank account and decide they are poor, too? :facepalm:

There ARE a lot of poor, indebted Canadians in the GTA or GVA...but trust me, there are also many truly rich (I'm not saying I am, but I can definitely afford some dinky Chanels on my professional salary that you guys think are ridiculous and stupid. Give it 10 years, and I would probably be able to sell each of them for more than the Toyota I drive. I already sold my Hermes. So I like flashy bags and I don't like flashy cars...what kind of a show-off am I?)

All these accusations of people keepin' up with the Joneses is tiresome, it reveals the bitter accusers more than shedding light on the truth. Lots of people are richer than outsiders would realize, and they would know why, and how...if they were part of the club. It's not a secret, exclusive club, either...it's actually become common.

Some made it almost completely on their own...others maybe inherited most of it. A lot of people have some part of both equations. Either way, almost no one accomplished everything they've accomplished on their own, even if some want to claim it. Again, if it makes a huge difference in how you feel, that's mostly your problem. See how far it gets you...
Sure a person who can afford a LV is shopping at the Gap at an outlet mall LOL.. which I have seen myself...
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This is a pretty productive thread
Firebolt wrote:
Feb 12th, 2016 1:09 pm
give lots of head for sick knee fadez, give lots of lap dances for ca$h wallet fades. Always pop that leg when kissing for dope honey combs, knee lots of mans in the crotch for killer whiskers, low ride like an og for them stacks. And traintracks? Only achievable by a legend in the denim game
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Mar 7, 2004
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Rich people stay rich by pretending they are broke and poor people stay poor pretending they are rich.
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$12.4 million means nothing if u don't have ur health. It means nothing to me if u r an immoral person.
De gustibus non est disputandum
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May 14, 2009
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Why on earth would someone keep $12M sitting in a bank account? (I know it may not sit there for long and it's just one slip, but still...do something more productive with it?)
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amz155 wrote:
Apr 7th, 2017 7:55 am
Why on earth would someone keep $12M sitting in a bank account? (I know it may not sit there for long and it's just one slip, but still...do something more productive with it?)
Because the guy who originally released that pic to the internet admitted that it's a business account. It most likely isn't even all his own money to keep - it could be from venture capitalists, investors, business loans, etc. and is required for the daily / weekly / quarterly operating expenses. Thereby obscuring how much of it actually is "financial freedom", but hey, attach some feel-good you-can-do-it-too message to the receipt and let people make the most of applying to their own lives, I guess.

It's definitely an interesting social and psychological observation how often people--and particularly in threads such as this, women--are judged for what they have. It is a tad old-fashioned to think a man (boyfriend or husband) bought it for them; I don't know a single female in my life who doesn't work and earn on her own. I think those people should rather be asking themselves why they preoccupy their minds so much with other people's spending that it generates negative assumptions and emotions.

I've made peace with the fact that I'm a great ape and to some extent I've got apeish tribal desires, and I don't think it makes me or anybody else base or lame. I get excited when someone else tells me about their bag they love, or car, watch or [other luxury item], and if they got it at a great deal (auction, pre-owned sales site, etc.), even better. I openly look at and admire when someone has something nice. I don't think it is contradictory at all that anyone who has any of those things might be spotted at Dollarama or outlet stores continuing to look for smart ways to extend their money, especially if they are comfortably middle class but not (yet) a multimillionaire who can skip working for the rest of their life. Actually, it's made me want to work smarter, and think harder about what I consciously decide to spend my money on, what's worth it and what's not. Some wardrobe staples, yes, worth spending more $$$ at times; trendy 1-2 season items, no. Basic T-shirts and tank tops, I shop the Gap at 40% off, socks from Target, and so on.

One of the sadder observations of my life is that after working right into their 70's, grandparents in my family spend on a few indulgences like jewelry, watches, etc. but as one of my child-cousins aptly put it, "You don't look any different, Grandma." My own parents are at grandparent age now, and I know my mom eyes some of the nice things I have and wonders if she could have one, too. But she won't buy it herself because she asks, "What's the point for a senior to have it, at this phase in life?" and will NOT let me buy FOR her, either.

My point is: I don't see why piling up all your money and saving to the max until you hit late 30's or 40's or 60's, is necessarily better. You miss out on having certain memories and experiences with something beautiful and well-crafted. You also miss out on learning some of the differences between fast fashion disposables and quality items made to last and maybe even look better with age and use. You may not realize that Michael Kors is a respected designer who used to make solid domestic items, but his licensed "affordable luxury" brands like Michael by Michael Kors is utter @#$% who steals designs from design houses that actually invest in design teams, and was founded with the purpose of making big profits from third-world volume manufacturing...and there are several companies just like this using licensed designer names.

After years of being a poor student, in the 1-2 immediate years following graduation I found it really hard to look for and spend on a few nice things...at some point I had two simultaneous professional sources of income (equivalent to two full-time jobs!) but I wasn't spending--that's how anxious I was. And stressed, and a little depressed. Then I re-assessed and asked myself, do I need to pile up a mountain of money as my ultimate goal, and delay gratification for 2-3 decades, reaching "financial freedom" before I treat myself to something truly nice? So (no offense), I can be old and wrinkly and rich and then feel posh? And, not to be too cynical either--we may not even live to see that day--it's a regular event that someone gets into an accident or catches a serious illness before they are 50.

So if someone has something nice, and they clearly like it, can't you just be happy for them? I think it's a big assumption to think they are just trying to impress you or show off, and again it mystifies me why you let it bother you.

As for financial health, someone may look like a "priced out renter" spending on frivolous things...but the truth is some people will never need a mortgage, and I know for a FACT that this has common. Many peers I went to elementary school, high school, university with...honestly, even some bumpkin ignorant family members of mine with no education had multiple properties from the 90's that they've sold and overnight became millionaires with. Reducing tax exposure means that others may have the assets under their name in the family. So it's more than just "keeping up with the Joneses" -- the GTA has become an actual community of Joneses, like when Manhattan and the surrounding NYC got their period of huge growth in real estate valuation, and San Francisco/Bay Area, etc. Some of the local paper wealth will probably evaporate soon. Some of it is quite real, I guess we will find out in the next 2-3 years what the true ratio will end up settling at.

Personally, I think it's more toxic for people to be spreading lies and fantasies about wealth they allegedly generated all on their own, such as in that photo of the receipt, urging people to ignore relationships, and "distractions" (i.e. life.)
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It's all well and good for people to have nice things. Just don't be a douche about it.

I think it's just so incredibly low class to brag about things that you own.
Firebolt wrote:
Feb 12th, 2016 1:09 pm
give lots of head for sick knee fadez, give lots of lap dances for ca$h wallet fades. Always pop that leg when kissing for dope honey combs, knee lots of mans in the crotch for killer whiskers, low ride like an og for them stacks. And traintracks? Only achievable by a legend in the denim game
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nasa25 wrote:
Apr 9th, 2017 10:54 am
It's all well and good for people to have nice things. Just don't be a douche about it.

I think it's just so incredibly low class to brag about things that you own.
What constitutes bragging and douching?

Talking about things we own?
Using things we own?
Instagramming things we own?
Posting in what-you-wearing-today-what-did-you-buy-today-1140663/ on RFD?

By the way some people make it sound, I would be bragging about a rustbucket on wheels or showing off a plastic shopping bag just by having and using them.

If I were an alien species, how would you explain the difference, besides "Oh I just felt annoyed and judgey at the person even though I'm not a telepath and can't say for sure what their motivations are."

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