Home & Garden

Dehumidifier in the winter - never draws out any water

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 30th, 2020 1:04 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 10, 2008
4408 posts
880 upvotes

Dehumidifier in the winter - never draws out any water

Is there any reason why I can never seem to draw out any moisture from my dehumidifier in the winter?

Interior temp is 20*C and the humidity reading is 35-40%. I'll run it 24h+ and won't draw out anything.

In the summer, the interior temp might be 22*C and a humidity reading of 50-60%, and I'll empty a bucket every day. Is it a temperature thing? Or do they struggle to work well when the humidity is already low-ish
Let's hug it out
24 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 12, 2007
4339 posts
701 upvotes
Waterloo
RCGA wrote: Is there any reason why I can never seem to draw out any moisture from my dehumidifier in the winter?

Interior temp is 20*C and the humidity reading is 35-40%. I'll run it 24h+ and won't draw out anything.

In the summer, the interior temp might be 22*C and a humidity reading of 50-60%, and I'll empty a bucket every day. Is it a temperature thing? Or do they struggle to work well when the humidity is already low-ish
If the humidity is already 35-40% , what is your expected humidity? thats already kinda low. If this is in the basement You can prolly turn this off if there is good airflow thru.
----
Pay it forward.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
13375 posts
13756 upvotes
Oakville
RCGA wrote: Is there any reason why I can never seem to draw out any moisture from my dehumidifier in the winter?

Interior temp is 20*C and the humidity reading is 35-40%. I'll run it 24h+ and won't draw out anything.

In the summer, the interior temp might be 22*C and a humidity reading of 50-60%, and I'll empty a bucket every day. Is it a temperature thing? Or do they struggle to work well when the humidity is already low-ish
What kind of humidifier is it? Sounds like a large stand alone floor unit? I assume the fan is running properly and any filters are cleared/clean?
As the temperature drops it will hold less humidity.

*nevermind, OP looking at DE-humidifier*
Last edited by engineered on Jan 27th, 2020 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
2647 posts
841 upvotes
Windsor
Is it something you bought at Canadian Tire, and is more than 1 year old? If so, you need to do some Googling to get an RMA, as your compressor is likely dead. If you have a Kill-A-Watt, see the power draw; it should be in the 400w range if it's trying to do anything. I'm on my 5th Noma/Garrison; fun times.
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
13375 posts
13756 upvotes
Oakville
LOL, I just realized OP is talking about a DE-humidifier and not a humidifier. So used to needing humidity in the winter.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 5, 2009
5357 posts
3135 upvotes
You should not need a dehumidifier in the winter because of how dry the air is. Usually people run humidifiers to add moisture back into the air.

What is the target humidity set on the dehumidifier? I’m guessing it’s set above the relative humidity in the air.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 6, 2017
651 posts
322 upvotes
Manitoba
Coz it's not humid? *shrugs*
one more deal and I'm out * involuntary tick*.... :twisted:
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 27, 2011
3248 posts
1510 upvotes
Waterloo
Just curious but what is everyone's humidity in the winter without a humidifier?
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
3447 posts
1420 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
crystallight wrote: Just curious but what is everyone's humidity in the winter without a humidifier?
60-65%
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
2647 posts
841 upvotes
Windsor
crystallight wrote: Just curious but what is everyone's humidity in the winter without a humidifier?
Did a considerable amount of basement sealing this summer, and my whole home humidifier doesn't work. If it matters, it's a ~1200sq.ft ranch w/finished basement, and an attached garage, built in 1969:

Main floor: 43%
Basement: 47.1%
Crawlspace: 48.5%
Cellar: 52.3%
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 6, 2017
651 posts
322 upvotes
Manitoba
mickman wrote: Thats pretty high for the winter.
What does that mean? Mine usually is 40-50% @21c. We do cook and use a rice cooker everyday which adds serious amounts of moisture in the house. LOL
one more deal and I'm out * involuntary tick*.... :twisted:
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
3978 posts
3166 upvotes
Toronto
As others have said, why are you trying to dehumidify in the winter? Much less than the 35% you're currently on and you'll start getting static, etc. If you're trying to reduce condensation on the windows, open your blinds/drapes to allow airflow over the glass.

If you have it on 24/7, but there's no water accumulated, then the fan is on, but the compressor isn't turning on. Most dehumidifiers have a built-in humidstat so the compressor will turn off at the user-set RH% or a built-in RH% level. Generally, the lowest level you can set it at (or the built-in cutoff) is somewhere around 40%, I read somewhere before. They're meant to get you from the 90% to a more comfortable level in the summer, but they're not meant to get you to, say, 20% or lower.

If you really want to test it and confirm the compressor isn't broken, turn on a hot shower with the dehumifier in the bathroom, don't turn on the bathroom fan and see if the compressor eventually kicks in.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 23, 2011
508 posts
497 upvotes
West GTA
TehRFDAnomaly wrote: What does that mean? Mine usually is 40-50% @21c. We do cook and use a rice cooker everyday which adds serious amounts of moisture in the house. LOL
I try to keep mine at around 40%. My windows are able to handle that without getting too much condensation.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 6, 2017
651 posts
322 upvotes
Manitoba
mickman wrote: I try to keep mine at around 40%. My windows are able to handle that without getting too much condensation.
Ah yes. My triple panes can handle that amount of humidity but my huge living room double pane window sweats like a pig in a slaughterhouse. It is not just the indoor humidity that causes that though...extreme temps (we are in Manitoba), closed curtains during the night add to the equation.
one more deal and I'm out * involuntary tick*.... :twisted:

Top