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  • Nov 13th, 2018 9:55 pm
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Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
198 posts
12 upvotes
Vancouver
Mulder and Scully wrote:
Aug 22nd, 2018 8:37 pm
This is good to hear. The pain is what I'm fearing. My quoted cost for tooth extraction and new implant was $5,000. Also a canine tooth for me. I'm not looking forward to this.
Assuming the surgeon is good, it will not be bad at all - and this is coming from soemeone who gets usually quite nervous and queezy about this stuff
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Jun 23, 2005
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For people who have had this done, just curious what happened to the original tooth where it could not be saved (accident/loss due to periodontal disease)?
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
198 posts
12 upvotes
Vancouver
toguy wrote:
Aug 22nd, 2018 11:34 pm
For people who have had this done, just curious what happened to the original tooth where it could not be saved (accident/loss due to periodontal disease)?
I still had a baby tooth that stuck with me for 35+years because the permanent tooth never formed. It finally gave way, and I decided that an implant was the best option instead a bridge which would affect two perfectly good neighboring teeth
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Dec 4, 2010
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jelena-c wrote:
Oct 27th, 2017 6:23 pm
it was around 2500
first i had a screw placed in and after some time..........i think 2 months but can't remember correctly, i had a tooth screwed onto that screw
the drilling was what freaked me out the most, but he gave me so much anesthsia i think if a horse kicked me in the face i wouldn't have felt it


I didn't see this thread. I feel your pain brothers and sister. ..

Ii dont want to scare any potential candidates but during my extraction I kept getting the visual of some sinister guy with rusty pliars hovering over me and yanking my teeth out. Ibswear it felt like my jaw was going to snap off like the zombies in walking g dead who had no lower jaw... It was this aggressive or so I imagined.


Anyway I'm having second thoughts. Read my other thread. It isn't so much the money but the thought of pain. I'm one of those people who only visit the dentist because something is wrong rather than being proactive about it. This time I had no issue and tried to be proactive and now I'm freaked out about the pain.

For anyone who has done it, is the membrane after the bone graft suppose to taste so freaking foul? It's making me gag just thinking about it. My stitches have come loose so I don't know what's coming next. I think I'll probably get a fresh dose of thing and restitched but man it's nasty af!
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Jun 23, 2005
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spider78 wrote:
Aug 23rd, 2018 12:20 am
I still had a baby tooth that stuck with me for 35+years because the permanent tooth never formed. It finally have way, and I decided that an implant was the best option instead a bridge which would affect two perfectly good neighboring teeth
Wow, didn't know baby teeth have the potential to last that long!

I had an extraction of my wisdom teeth and an adjacent tooth (on one side only) 10+ years ago and ever since, there's been this huge gap there way at the back. So what ends up happening is anytime I am eating something very hard in texture (raw almonds, etc.), I tend to send it to the other side of my mouth where I still have all the molars back there for easier chewing. It's not that I can't chew these types of foods, but it's just easier that way.

Have thought about whether I could get an implant on the one side to make chewing a bit easier/more balanced (not sure if it would even be possible in my case) but given that it is *not* for cosmetic reasons, given the cost plus what I would have to go through, don't know that it's worth all the trouble.
Member
Dec 29, 2012
482 posts
84 upvotes
Scarborough
toguy wrote:
Aug 23rd, 2018 6:14 am
Wow, didn't know baby teeth have the potential to last that long!

I had an extraction of my wisdom teeth and an adjacent tooth (on one side only) 10+ years ago and ever since, there's been this huge gap there way at the back. So what ends up happening is anytime I am eating something very hard in texture (raw almonds, etc.), I tend to send it to the other side of my mouth where I still have all the molars back there for easier chewing. It's not that I can't chew these types of foods, but it's just easier that way.

Have thought about whether I could get an implant on the one side to make chewing a bit easier/more balanced (not sure if it would even be possible in my case) but given that it is *not* for cosmetic reasons, given the cost plus what I would have to go through, don't know that it's worth all the trouble.
I have a "failed root canal" on my back-most upper molar, and probably will need it pulled. How did you prepare for the tooth extraction, how painful was it, and how long to recover? Did you get local anaesthetic or sedation? I have to go back to work the day after, so want to be prepped for this. Thanks for any info as you know the dental websites never give us the full story.
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Jun 23, 2005
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Catnippy wrote:
Sep 3rd, 2018 10:38 pm
I have a "failed root canal" on my back-most upper molar, and probably will need it pulled. How did you prepare for the tooth extraction, how painful was it, and how long to recover? Did you get local anaesthetic or sedation? I have to go back to work the day after, so want to be prepped for this. Thanks for any info as you know the dental websites never give us the full story.
I had local anaesthetic, and I felt it was more than sufficient. There are definitely people who might get freaked out seeing their own teeth being pulled out (potentially with blood, etc.) and they may opt for the laughing gas. Took me about a week to recover, and I worked from home during this time. Not really because of extreme pain or anything, but I would definitely need to brush my teeth at work and didn't really want anyone seeing that (potentially with blood from sore gums). If I had any significant pain, it was only on the first day, apart from that, I never touched the Tylenol 3s I was prescribed. I was recommended a liquid diet (i.e. primarily soups/smoothies) for the week, to reduce the chances of food particles getting caught in the area and potentially leading to infection (plus you want to give those teeth a rest for a week). IIRC, the sutures in my mouth were the dissolving type, so there's no going back to have them removed after.
Member
Dec 29, 2012
482 posts
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Scarborough
Thanks toguy for the info. Did you take antibiotics before the procedure and did they have to cut the bone or gum? Can you rinse with Listerine to prevent infection? I may ask for a dentist note so I can work from home. LOL, I hate the dentist - when I was a kid, my parents had to buy me a new toy before I would go!
Member
Dec 29, 2012
482 posts
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Scarborough
So I went back to the same endodontist, and had a CT scan. Sad thing is the insurance will only pay for cost of normal x-ray ($76 out of $95) but not the full fee of $315. I called the Royal College of Dentists of Canada who told me he should not charge me for a repeat root canal, and he will not I confirmed. But if tooth is fractured, then I'll need it pulled.
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Jul 26, 2004
2579 posts
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Catnippy wrote:
Sep 4th, 2018 11:45 am
Thanks toguy for the info. Did you take antibiotics before the procedure and did they have to cut the bone or gum? Can you rinse with Listerine to prevent infection? I may ask for a dentist note so I can work from home. LOL, I hate the dentist - when I was a kid, my parents had to buy me a new toy before I would go!
No need for antibiotic if there is no infection before. Cutting of bone/gum is only needed if one can't remove the tooth and need to expose more of the tooth in order to extract it. As for listerine, do not recommend listerine since most versions have alcohol in it, could desiccate the wound. Just good old lukewarm salt water to rinse a few times a day would work, or have your dentist write you a prescription for chlorhexidine rinse. For the most part if the tooth can be removed with out cutting bone/gum, you shouldn't be bed riddened or anything like that, may feel uncomfortable, but definitely won't need to stay home from work.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
29097 posts
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East Gwillimbury
It's a lengthy process and mine took 2 years. The total cost was $5,600. Considered cosmetic and insurance didn't help

1) Tooth Extraction
2) Waited 6 months to heal
3) Sinus lift
4) Grafting (insertion of bone)
5) Wait 6 months for bone to fuse and gums to heal (stitches)
6) Insertion of screw
7) Waited 12 months for bone to fuse to screw
8) Crown

I had to buy my own meds and rinse every day with a prescription rinse.

The crown is not as good as your real tooth, but it is better than a bridge and if you need it done, I suggest you do it.
Sr. Member
Jan 3, 2005
677 posts
49 upvotes
spider78 wrote:
Aug 23rd, 2018 12:20 am
I still had a baby tooth that stuck with me for 35+years because the permanent tooth never formed. It finally gave way, and I decided that an implant was the best option instead a bridge which would affect two perfectly good neighboring teeth
This is exactly what happened to me, although my adult tooth tried to grow but sort of grew sideways and it's sitting there in my gums. It's been like that for years and I didn't even know until I saw the Xrays. The dentist says there's no reason to take it out if there's no pain, and there isn't.
Anyway, I have the screw in place for my implant and I will be getting the crown soon.
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Dec 4, 2010
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Gee wrote:
Sep 9th, 2018 1:31 am
It's a lengthy process and mine took 2 years. The total cost was $5,600. Considered cosmetic and insurance didn't help

1) Tooth Extraction
2) Waited 6 months to heal
3) Sinus lift
4) Grafting (insertion of bone)
5) Wait 6 months for bone to fuse and gums to heal (stitches)
6) Insertion of screw
7) Waited 12 months for bone to fuse to screw
8) Crown

I had to buy my own meds and rinse every day with a prescription rinse.

The crown is not as good as your real tooth, but it is better than a bridge and if you need it done, I suggest you do it.
What constitutes "if you need" it?

On one side of my mouth, I had an extraction as a kid and was given a bridge in place of the void. It lasted about 10 years and it came off and I haven't had a replacement since and I was cautioned that my teeth would sort of slant because of the void. Haven't noticed. About 3 months ago I went to extract the other side, had several root canals done on it and was giving me the strong suspicion the next infection was just around the corner. Fully intended on doing an implant or bridge but either way was determined to get rid of the bad tooth so I did. 1 month after the gum has kind of healed shut. I'm contemplating whether I want to do anything with it. Most of my teeth are still mine and the two missing molars doesnt' really impact my chewing abilities. Aesthetically you can't really see it but I'm not one of those who goes around smiling all the time. Do I need to do it? More concerned about the health implications more than anything else.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
29097 posts
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East Gwillimbury
Supercooled wrote:
Oct 31st, 2018 8:02 pm
What constitutes "if you need" it?
You should not leave a gap

1. Your teeth will slant
2. The top tooth doesn't have a bottom tooth to grind against and may fall out.

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