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[OP]
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Dec 5, 2006
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RojoRojoWine wrote: You can always go laptop Monitor, Keyboard, Mouse, HDMI Cable, and you will have both a desktop and a laptop. I use to do this, and some of my friends still do this.
Yes trying to go this routine too. Just want to confirm whether those monitor like 23 inch is good for kid eyes
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smartie wrote:
Mar 18th, 2017 10:42 am

Yes trying to go this routine too. Just want to confirm whether those monitor like 23 inch is good for kid eyes
The bigger the better since your kid won't have to squint when looking at it.

Also, certain monitors have blue light filtering technology.
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We used iPad and iMac (in the kitchen)
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[OP]
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nalababe wrote: We used iPad and iMac (in the kitchen)
My son is only 6 and feel it's excessive to give him iMac
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Oct 25, 2016
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Don't get either. Look--your kid (if not already) is going to have many chances to get sucked into an online world, social networks and 'educational games'. Take the opportunity you have now, before they are addicted and tantrum when not having the computer, to send them outside or put them in real life learning. Have them build (physically) a rocket or candle lanterns. There are a million better ways to learn that don't start with lego mindstorms--and the impending "everything on the computer is better" mentality.
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smartie wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 8:07 pm
My son is only 6 and feel it's excessive to give him iMac
Even our 13 year old doesn't have his own. They are family devices. We keep our Imac in the kitchen as the family computer.
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ElliottGalt wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 11:30 pm
Don't get either. Look--your kid (if not already) is going to have many chances to get sucked into an online world, social networks and 'educational games'. Take the opportunity you have now, before they are addicted and tantrum when not having the computer, to send them outside or put them in real life learning. Have them build (physically) a rocket or candle lanterns. There are a million better ways to learn that don't start with lego mindstorms--and the impending "everything on the computer is better" mentality.
It's controversial. To grow up in this high-tech world, you have to be exposed to it. If there is a genuine interest in LEGO Mindstorms, why would you discourage it? It's not like the kid will be on the laptop watching YouTube of garbage channels all day, or even that the kid would be doing Mindstorms all day either.

bjl
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t3359 wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 3:39 pm
It's controversial. To grow up in this high-tech world, you have to be exposed to it. If there is a genuine interest in LEGO Mindstorms, why would you discourage it? It's not like the kid will be on the laptop watching YouTube of garbage channels all day, or even that the kid would be doing Mindstorms all day either.

bjl
Anyone would be hard pressed to not exposs their child to the high tech world--even if they everything they could to hide it. This is not the argument I am putting forth. My reasoning is simple. It is much easier to develop the lungs, motor coordination, spatial awareness and healthy living habits when a child is 6 and not on a computer. Computers are addicting as they tend to be used for entertainment. The stimulus a computer provides is hard to match--most games (even educational) are built on addictive principles. He might not be on youtube all day--but he will one day. How soon will that day come and what tools/education have you given to war against it?

I see this every day, I read assessment reports daily from Occupational Therapists and visit peoples homes who have kids that watch youtube all day. It is incredibly important to teach kids about work and that computers are a tool--before teaching them about computers are entertainment. Once computers are entertainment, then people try to use entertainment to teach learning--as traditional learning is no longer interesting enough--this of course causes behaviours that would not have existed otherwise.

You certainly are free to do what you like--as you are right--children are going to be exposed to a high-tech world. The question is not 'if' they will be exposed but how will you expose them. I would suggest knowing that the computers are hard to resist--give your kids a fighting chance. Not to become luddites but to develop self control around them.
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ElliottGalt wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 6:33 pm
Anyone would be hard pressed to not exposs their child to the high tech world--even if they everything they could to hide it. This is not the argument I am putting forth. My reasoning is simple. It is much easier to develop the lungs, motor coordination, spatial awareness and healthy living habits when a child is 6 and not on a computer. Computers are addicting as they tend to be used for entertainment. The stimulus a computer provides is hard to match--most games (even educational) are built on addictive principles. He might not be on youtube all day--but he will one day. How soon will that day come and what tools/education have you given to war against it?

I see this every day, I read assessment reports daily from Occupational Therapists and visit peoples homes who have kids that watch youtube all day. It is incredibly important to teach kids about work and that computers are a tool--before teaching them about computers are entertainment. Once computers are entertainment, then people try to use entertainment to teach learning--as traditional learning is no longer interesting enough--this of course causes behaviours that would not have existed otherwise.

You certainly are free to do what you like--as you are right--children are going to be exposed to a high-tech world. The question is not 'if' they will be exposed but how will you expose them. I would suggest knowing that the computers are hard to resist--give your kids a fighting chance. Not to become luddites but to develop self control around them.
I think we will agree to disagree and leave it at that. But it's quite a jump from buying a kid a latptop to explore technology in the form of LEGO mindstorms to kids mindlessly watching YouTube videos all day.

bjl
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Dec 30, 1969
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As a parent who has waged war against mindless technology, yet my oldest had her own refurbish Mac book by 4 and youngest by 5, here's my many random thoughts on mindnu,bong technology.


[/list] we hardly let our oldest watchhardly TV until almost 5 or 6, occasionally as family movies to get her. Time was and is still spent reading, and playing.
- our oldest started 'playing' on a laptop (we don't own desktops) at 2. Her playing consisted of hitting the alphabet keys and typing out the alphabet in word and powerpoint. She was an early reader and speller so she loved typing her name and random words. I also taught her to 'draw' by dropping shapes and changing colours and font styles on to the screen. We did this without any internet connection. By the time she hit grade one she was doing her own PowerPoint presentations. That year (age 6) we did enable internet under very high patent controls, no youtube. She used it to find facts and research things to a greater depth that they talked about in school.
- in grade 2, At school that year, the teacher gave the kids the option to do a PowerPoint presentaion, but didn't think of teaching the class PowerPoint. My chid showed the tmost of the class how to do things. She did some great presentations.
In grade 3, the rest of her friends, started getting email, she had it for a while on the family domain. She started to learn how to communicate via email with friends, and they started writing stories together and exchanging ideas. Funny year, watching kids learn to use technology, including the telephone. Teaching telephone etiquette was the hardest. Everything still rather locked down , but her friends houses not so much, so we had to take along time explaination what we deem appropriate even when we are not around.
- grade 4. Child got a phone. THIS IS WHEN YOU SHOULD BE WORRIED! It's has never been the computer or laptop. We had decided a phone ONLY because my children had been lost on the bus, left behind, dropped off at random non stops (All of it due to bus drivers that weren't trained). So she got a phone . She was the first, but wasn't the last. This is when the trouble happened. The text messaging, the social media. This rough ALOT of coaching we hope we have gotten through the worst.
-grade five, she loves her phone, we have to stay on top of things as parents and set many rules. No phones at dinner, or in their bed rooms, technology turns on and off at certain times (her wifi automatically is only accessible for certain times). She also started her own blog this year. Alll her friends tried to copy because they thought it was such a cool idea. My oldest is an introvert, and she has found that technology has been a way for her to take the time to express her thoughts in a comfortable way and actually connect with her friends. in person, they are not on computers, but it is a way o connect.

Our youngest will follow a similar path in technology. We started Our kids out with technology at a young age, but it has been more of a positive experience than a bad. Like anything parenting related, it takes work. The both did a programming camp last summer with Python. they also did a swim, a drama camp, and diving camp. its all about balance. Though I agree it's easy to let technology become a baby sitter, if that may be the case, then wait as long as you can.
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Ironically, my kids' friendshink we are the strictest household when it comes to technology, yet my kids can do more than all of them. We just try and keep the junk to a minimum.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos.
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