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Ditra Membrane Final Thickness

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[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 9, 2013
172 posts
107 upvotes
Kitchener

Ditra Membrane Final Thickness

Hello RFD,

I'm currently in the planning process of installing hardwood and porcelain tiles on my main floor, and would like to use Ditra membrane (from Schluter) under the tiles.

The Ditra membrane itself is 1/8" thick, and Schluter recommends using a size 1/4"x3/16" V notched or Square notch trowel 11/64"x11/64" between the subfloor to Ditra, and 1/4"x3/8" square or U notched trowel between Ditra to the tile. But they can't tell me the final thickness of the entire sandwich, so does anyone here having used Ditra in the past can give a rough estimate?

Just want to make sure my 3/4" hardwood can have a nice and flush transition to the porcelain tiles.

Thank you,
RQ
16 replies
Deal Addict
Apr 22, 2014
2973 posts
427 upvotes
Oshawa, ON
The maximum comes from adding up 3/16+3/8+1/8=11/16" so almost 3/4". Then add your tile, is it 3/8"? That number I don't know, but you can figure it out. Allow for a bit of squish down (I'd do a practice square on some scrap plywood and measure after it sets. The difference will be how much you have to raise your subfloor on the wood side.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 22, 2007
6096 posts
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Mississauga
This is a copy and past from Schluter's web site, when I did my bathroom floor I used Ditra XL rather then the standard Ditra and it was perfectly even with my marble threshold. ( I used this between ceramic tile and hardwood floor to give it a clean transition) which was perfectly level with the 3/4" hardwood floor that was in the hallway outside my bathroom.

What is the difference between Schluter®-DITRA and Schluter®-DITRA-XL?

Schluter uncoupling membranes provide the four essential functions for successful tile installation over a wide range of substrates, including plywood/OSB, concrete, gypsum, heated floors, etc. The choice between using DITRA or DITRA-XL depends on the nature of the particular project or application. The following points will help differentiate between the two products.

DITRA

• Minimizes tile assembly thickness and reduces transitions to lower surface coverings (e.g., carpet, engineered wood, and vinyl)

• Only 1/8" (3 mm)-thick – provides the thinnest possible assembly without sacrificing performance

DITRA-XL

• Allows for ceramic tile application over single layer plywood/OSB subfloors on joists spaced at 24" (610 mm) o.c.

• 5/16" (7 mm)-thick – creates an even transition between typical 5/16" (7 mm)-thick tile and 3/4" (19 mm)-thick hardwood flooring
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 9, 2013
172 posts
107 upvotes
Kitchener
Thank you both for the reply.

If I use MMBLF's experience as a guideline, then it sounds like it will actually work out fine. My tiles are close to 1cm thick (or 3/8"?) so if I use the regular Ditra (which is 3mm thinner than his XL), but my tile is about 3mm thicker, hopefully it cancels out and I get a nice even transition :)

Just to be safe I will perform a test like Eldee suggested, now that I know I should be pretty close in theory.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 2, 2005
656 posts
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Toronto
I just did this and used Ditra XL with porcelain tiles. My hardwood is like <2mm lower than my tile.

FYI. use modified thin set for the Ditra and unmodified for your tiles.
Deal Addict
Nov 30, 2003
2149 posts
511 upvotes
Nunavut
The thin set will squish down to maybe 1/16" using the proper trowel

You also need to factor in the thickness of the tile

I used the regular ditra to match my 3/4" hardwood, my tile was slightly thicker than usual, I used a 3/4" notched trowel and also back buttered my tiles to give some extra height and of course to ensure good coverage + contact

In the end I found I probably could have used XL and trimmed my thin set a bit more, but I figured I would rather start lower and build it up than be too high right away and fight to get it down to match the hardwood

btw, I'm glad no one is paying attention to post #2 and that horrible math & advice to raise the wood subfloor - you can't just add up those numbers
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 9, 2013
172 posts
107 upvotes
Kitchener
Thank you guys, both of your experiences give me confidence that my tiles will end up pretty even with the hardwood!
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Oct 22, 2007
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RhetoricalQuestion

The manufacture of the tile as well as the tile size generally has a rule of thumb in regards to what size notch trowel you should use, which in turn will give you a general idea of the thin set thickness, than it's a matter of doing the math to decide which thickness of ditra to use. Yes some layer on the thinset a bit thick but depending on whether you're using modified or unmodified thin set, it's not always a good idea to layer on the thin set too thick as you may not get the best bond between the tile and thin set/ditra even if you back butter the tile.

The largest variable will be the tile thickness and once you know that dimension, it's no longer a variable.

Please let us know how you make out and good luck with your reno.
Deal Addict
Nov 30, 2003
2149 posts
511 upvotes
Nunavut
Maymybonneliveforever wrote:
Apr 13th, 2016 7:55 am
RhetoricalQuestion

The manufacture of the tile as well as the tile size generally has a rule of thumb in regards to what size notch trowel you should use, which in turn will give you a general idea of the thin set thickness, than it's a matter of doing the math to decide which thickness of ditra to use. Yes some layer on the thinset a bit thick but depending on whether you're using modified or unmodified thin set, it's not always a good idea to layer on the thin set too thick as you may not get the best bond between the tile and thin set/ditra even if you back butter the tile.

The largest variable will be the tile thickness and once you know that dimension, it's no longer a variable.

Please let us know how you make out and good luck with your reno.
Just to note, you should only use unmodified thinset on top of ditra - http://www.schluter.com/schluter-us/en_ ... ortar-type
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 9, 2013
172 posts
107 upvotes
Kitchener
Maymybonneliveforever wrote:
Apr 13th, 2016 7:55 am
RhetoricalQuestion

The manufacture of the tile as well as the tile size generally has a rule of thumb in regards to what size notch trowel you should use, which in turn will give you a general idea of the thin set thickness, than it's a matter of doing the math to decide which thickness of ditra to use. Yes some layer on the thinset a bit thick but depending on whether you're using modified or unmodified thin set, it's not always a good idea to layer on the thin set too thick as you may not get the best bond between the tile and thin set/ditra even if you back butter the tile.

The largest variable will be the tile thickness and once you know that dimension, it's no longer a variable.

Please let us know how you make out and good luck with your reno.
Yes that's exactly my original question, I don't have an estimate on the thickness of the thin-set layer after it's smushed down in the installation (for each specific notch size). I've done tile jobs before, but never had to deal with that consideration. Now that I'm doing my own home, of course I would not settle for anything less than perfection :lol:

Thanks for the words of encouragement, hopefully I do a better job than Homer's BBQ pit:

Image
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 22, 2007
6096 posts
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Mississauga
When ever I use either Ditra or Kerdi, I always void the warranty by using Versabond as my thinset. I just prefer working with it as it's served me well on the last couple of home reno's.


Good luck with your reno RhetoricalQuestion
Member
User avatar
Nov 26, 2003
471 posts
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GTA
If you plan on using large format tile, Lowes now stocks “Kerabond T” which can be used as a medium set mortar. It’s sold unmodified-what you need for using over Ditra-though it’s typically mixed with Keralastic (making it modified)-not what you want over Ditra.

I wouldn’t try to use it under Ditra, even with the Keralastic, as the consistency isn’t right. I used Ultraflex 2 or 3 under the Ditra which worked very well.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Mar 9, 2013
172 posts
107 upvotes
Kitchener
Hi everyone,

Just want to report that the tile job has gone well thanks to everyone's input. I was using the Regal series from Olympia Tile (the tiles are about 10mm thick) with regular Ditra membrane. I used 11/64 square notch for subfloor to Ditra and the 1/4 square notch for Ditra to tile. The final thickness came out perfect. I actually used a smaller 1/8 v-notch first because my tile was thicker than the typical ones, but that turned out too low.

So I guess the short lesson is, if you want the tile to be perfectly flush with the 3/4 hardwood, then need to use 10mm thick tiles with Schluter's recommended trowel sizes, or you'd lose about 3mm in height.

Thanks again to the community, hope this helps others down the road!

And here are some pics :D
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Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
503 posts
306 upvotes
Markham, ON
RhetoricalQuestion wrote:
Aug 8th, 2017 12:43 pm
Hi everyone,

Just want to report that the tile job has gone well thanks to everyone's input. I was using the Regal series from Olympia Tile (the tiles are about 10mm thick) with regular Ditra membrane. I used 11/64 square notch for subfloor to Ditra and the 1/4 square notch for Ditra to tile. The final thickness came out perfect. I actually used a smaller 1/8 v-notch first because my tile was thicker than the typical ones, but that turned out too low.

So I guess the short lesson is, if you want the tile to be perfectly flush with the 3/4 hardwood, then need to use 10mm thick tiles with Schluter's recommended trowel sizes, or you'd lose about 3mm in height.

Thanks again to the community, hope this helps others down the road!

And here are some pics :D
That looks perfect!

Have fun cleaning and babying that dark maple floor tho Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes
You going to see every speck of dust and marks on that floor lol

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