Entertainment

DIY Fixed Frame Projection Screen

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 14th, 2018 12:02 pm
[OP]
Member
Dec 28, 2011
316 posts
135 upvotes
OAKVILLE

DIY Fixed Frame Projection Screen

I have been asked to post about building your own Fixed Frame Projection Screen so here goes....

To get started, here's a couple of random pictures I took of what the finished product looks like and what the image looks like when projecting. I have a Epson 2040 projector and this is on the Cinema setting which is the lowest brightness.

I'll try and take some better pictures at some point.

Image

Image

Image

Before anything else, if you want to avoid all the trouble & fun of building your own screen, you can purchase a ready made screen and I highly recommend the Silver Tickets Products ones. http://silverticketproducts.com/
I did a lot of research and this one came out by far the most highly recommended and I saw one in action and it is a very impressive screen. Wirecutter also recommends this screen. http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-projector-screen/
So why didn't you get one, you may ask? The reason was that it wasn't in my budget as this was my first projector and the "Boss" would have gone mental if I had bought a screen as well as the projector all in one go.

Ok, so you've decided that you're going to build your own screen because you're a masochist and enjoy the pain of building things and trust me there will be pain! LOL!

1. Calculating Dimensions & Size
First thing you need to do is calculate the size of the screen. Here's a calculator that I found randomly on Google. http://www.projectorscreen.com/projecto ... alculators You can also use the Epson calculator https://www.epson.com/alf_upload/landin ... alculator/ I went with a 120" diagonal screen.
My screen is 120" diagonal which gives me a Viewable Height of 58.875" and Viewable Width of 104.625" (please note here that I am talking about Viewable Height and Viewable Width. This is not the actual height and width of your frame.)

2. Choosing Screen Materials
Once you have your dimensions, you have to decide on which material to use. I used Black-Out Cloth as it doesn't allow any light to pass through and has about a gain of 1.0 which is ample for bright Epson projectors. You can also use Vinyl Cloth which gives you a very bright picture but will allow some light to go through. Both of these materials are stretchy which will become important later on when you are trying to fasten the material to your frame.
If your screen is smaller than 106" diagonal, you can pick up Black-Out Cloth from Fabricland for about $5-$10/metre. They do have more expensive ones but you don't need those. This material is 54" wide.
If your screen is 110" to 120" diagonal, you can buy the Vinyl Cloth from Fabricland as an alternative as it is 60" wide.
For any screen larger than 106" using Black-Out Cloth built from locally sourced materials, you have to use material that is 110" wide. This is available from Drapery King Toronto for about $25/metre. http://draperytoronto.com/ This material will allow you to build a screen up to 225" diagonal. Alternatively, you can rotate the material and build a screen that is 125" diagonal by using the 110" wide side as your length instead of your height. (Hope that makes sense!)
Alternatively, you can order custom sized materials from the US http://www.carlofet.com/ and they start to become a lot more expensive and it will be cheaper to just buy a ready made screen. I also looked at certain custom boards and other materials and even managed to source Glass Sand-Blasting beads from Home Depot In the US but in the end all those options were a lot more expensive or labour-intensive and it simply didn't make sense to build a screen that was going to cost 100's of $$ and take a lot of my time when ready made screens are only a couple of hundred dollars more. If you absolutely have your heart set on going the route of building a painted screen then I would recommend looking at this how-to. http://makezine.com/projects/make-35/gl ... on-screen/ Also, you can get Glass Sand Blasting Media from Home Depot in the US. http://www.homedepot.com/p/BLACK-BULL-B ... /203494098
I used Black-Out Cloth screen material that was 62"x110"

3. Building Frame
I used wood (cheapest option) to build the frame but you can also use steel (very expensive) or wood on steel studs (cheaper). I used 2"x4" lumber which you can buy from Home Depot or Lowes. You should know your dimensions from using the above calculator. I would stay away from using 1"x4" as some of the instructions online will tell you to use. Once the frame is built, it bows quite badly since the wood is not strong enough to maintain a uniform shape once the screen material is fastened onto the frame. Also, some online instructions will tell you to mitre the corners but trust me, it's a pain to glue and fasten them and doing straight cuts will give you a stronger frame and it's easier to ensure that your frame is square that way.
I used 2 pieces of 2"x4" 108.625" long (remember to add an extra 4" to your cut length dimensions if you will be adding a 2" border all around the frame like I did) Viewable Width + Width of Border = 104.625" + 4" = 108.625"
and 4 pieces of 2"x4" 59.875" (you're subtracting 3" from your viewable height measurement from the calculator because of the width of the 2"x4" lengths that are going at the top and bottom of the frame. Also, remember you're adding 4" to you cut length dimensions if you will be adding a 2" border all around the frame like I did) Viewable Height - Width of 2"x4" lengths for top & bottom of Frame + Width of Border = 58.875" - 3" + 4" = 59.875". I used 4 pieces as I included 2 vertical supports to help with the structure of the frame. At the end of this you should have 2 long pieces that will form the top and bottom of your frame and 4 short pieces that will form the left and right of your frame and also 2 vertical supports that will be installed about a 1/3 of the length in from each end.
To join the frame pieces, I used wood glue and also pieces of 1/4" plywood cut into 1'x1' triangles. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg I found this to be easier than using 'L' or 'T' or right angle brackets although you can use those if you prefer. Using the plywood triangles also helped me to ensure that my frame was perfectly square. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg

4. Attaching Screen Material
This is either easy or very difficult depending on your skill level and is definitely a 2 or 3 person job. You need a good manual stapler or pneumatic stapler to do a good job and a lot of attention to detail and patience. I had a powershot stapler which I found inadequate to do the job and ended up buying this DeWalt stapler as it was on sale for $25 and surprisingly it turned to be a very good stapler. https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.4-in ... 92270.html I thoroughly cleaned/vacuumed the floor where I was going to work and since it was carpeted, I didn't bother to put down a plastic sheet as others will suggest online. I laid out the screen material and ensured that there were no wrinkles and then I carefully laid the wood frame on top of the screen material with the triangle side pointing up. At this point, you need to staple the top and bottom and left and right sides of the material to the top edge or back side of the frame. Do not staple the material to the front face of the frame as you will see the staples once you start projecting. You will need to stretch the material quite tight and I found that there is about 1"-2" of play in the material. Here is an example of the order in which to staple. http://joeandcheryl.com/wp-content/uplo ... canvas.jpg Make sure that you're pulling the fabric away from the direction in which you're working as you want to ensure that you're removing any wrinkles as you work your way around the frame. I found that having 2 people hold the frame upright while I stapled was the easiest way to do it and I ended up stapling every couple of inches all the way around. Also, you can overlap the material on the corners. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg I used a light hammer to ensure that the staples were sitting flat on the frame. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg Once you have completing stapling, the screen material should be taut all the way around the frame and should sound like a drum when you lightly tap it with your finger. This means that there is sufficient tension in the screen. At this point, you can carefully trim any excess material using scissors. Do NOT use a knife as you don't want to puncture your screen front.

5. Adding A Border
At this point, your screen is pretty much finished but I went the extra step of attaching a 2" border all the way around. This helps create a visual break and also helps with boosting contrast and the results are well worth it. You can order the proper black velvet tape online and it can be expensive but I found that Gaffer Tape can be used as well. There's a bunch of places in Toronto where you can buy Gaffer Tape. I bought mine from http://rotblotts.com/ You cannot use Black Duct tape or electrical tape as it needs to be a cloth tape and needs to be photo-absorbent as far as I know. I know some people have successfully used Black Cloth Hockey tape that you can buy from Canadian Tire or Home Hardware but it has issues with staying on the screen sometimes and Gaffer tape is a lot more adhesive and will stay on for the life of your screen without you having to worry about re-applying the tape like you do with Hockey tape.

6. Mounting Screen
Success! You screen is now ready for mounting! I used metal corner braces to mount my screen. https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.2-in ... 73675.html I screwed them into the wall first and then they attach to the sides and top of the frame at the corners and cannot be seen when looking at the screen. This gives the illusion that the screen is floating and also ensures that it is completely flush with the wall and is as close to the wall as possible.

I'm posting this all from memory when I built the screen during the holidays last year so if I've forgotten anything, I'll edit the post to add more information and also if you have any questions, please feel free to ask and I will respond accordingly.

Finally, please let me know if you find this information valuable and please feel free to link this post so that other people on RFD may be able to use this information. (Please don't do a copypasta as it took me a couple of hours to write this all up).

Also, please feel free to show your appreciation by hitting thanks or any other way that you like! LOL!
14 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jul 16, 2003
10067 posts
377 upvotes
Toronto
Nice was what I did a few years ok.... Yah the border can be crazy pricey if velvet... I needed up using felt which I'm not happy but might switch to gaffer tape now that you mentioned it.... Once it's up too lazy to take down lol.. I used a French clef mount
Follow me on instagram to see Toronto https://instagram.com/kennyk3n/
Deal Addict
Oct 31, 2009
2872 posts
456 upvotes
Toronto
great post OP - for those that don't need a roll-up screen, building your own is fairly easy (you don't need to be a master woodworker) and you usually get a better product for what you could get premade for the same cost.

I made mine late last year and used 1x3 poplar boards and used this kreg jig to assemble - https://www.lowes.ca/drill-accessories/ ... 92400.html . Works very well and the frame is very sturdy with no bending or warping and can handle any material that you want to use.

I used a grey material because my projector doesn't have the greatest blacks (W1070), bought the flexigrey from Carls place in the US - http://www.carlofet.com/projector-scree ... thlP1co6M8

Heres a couple of pics -

pic of area with old 100" roll-up screen
Image

pic of frame overlayed over old screen to see how much more real estate I was getting !
Image

pic of new screen with black curtains now on the surrounding walls to help with contrast since I went with a borderless screen design
Image
Member
User avatar
May 25, 2010
216 posts
220 upvotes
Newmarket
Where did you buy your projector?
[OP]
Member
Dec 28, 2011
316 posts
135 upvotes
OAKVILLE
dogger99 wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2016 1:08 pm
Where did you buy your projector?
I bought my Epson 2040 from Best Buy back in November for $669.
Sr. Member
Feb 3, 2015
970 posts
186 upvotes
Toronto
jessagill wrote:
Mar 2nd, 2016 5:18 pm
I have been asked to post about building your own Fixed Frame Projection Screen so here goes....

To get started, here's a couple of random pictures I took of what the finished product looks like and what the image looks like when projecting. I have a Epson 2040 projector and this is on the Cinema setting which is the lowest brightness.

I'll try and take some better pictures at some point.

Image

Image

Image

Before anything else, if you want to avoid all the trouble & fun of building your own screen, you can purchase a ready made screen and I highly recommend the Silver Tickets Products ones. http://silverticketproducts.com/
I did a lot of research and this one came out by far the most highly recommended and I saw one in action and it is a very impressive screen. Wirecutter also recommends this screen. http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-projector-screen/
So why didn't you get one, you may ask? The reason was that it wasn't in my budget as this was my first projector and the "Boss" would have gone mental if I had bought a screen as well as the projector all in one go.

Ok, so you've decided that you're going to build your own screen because you're a masochist and enjoy the pain of building things and trust me there will be pain! LOL!

1. Calculating Dimensions & Size
First thing you need to do is calculate the size of the screen. Here's a calculator that I found randomly on Google. http://www.projectorscreen.com/projecto ... alculators You can also use the Epson calculator https://www.epson.com/alf_upload/landin ... alculator/ I went with a 120" diagonal screen.
My screen is 120" diagonal which gives me a Viewable Height of 58.875" and Viewable Width of 104.625" (please note here that I am talking about Viewable Height and Viewable Width. This is not the actual height and width of your frame.)

2. Choosing Screen Materials
Once you have your dimensions, you have to decide on which material to use. I used Black-Out Cloth as it doesn't allow any light to pass through and has about a gain of 1.0 which is ample for bright Epson projectors. You can also use Vinyl Cloth which gives you a very bright picture but will allow some light to go through. Both of these materials are stretchy which will become important later on when you are trying to fasten the material to your frame.
If your screen is smaller than 106" diagonal, you can pick up Black-Out Cloth from Fabricland for about $5-$10/metre. They do have more expensive ones but you don't need those. This material is 54" wide.
If your screen is 110" to 120" diagonal, you can buy the Vinyl Cloth from Fabricland as an alternative as it is 60" wide.
For any screen larger than 106" using Black-Out Cloth built from locally sourced materials, you have to use material that is 110" wide. This is available from Drapery King Toronto for about $25/metre. http://draperytoronto.com/ This material will allow you to build a screen up to 225" diagonal. Alternatively, you can rotate the material and build a screen that is 125" diagonal by using the 110" wide side as your length instead of your height. (Hope that makes sense!)
Alternatively, you can order custom sized materials from the US http://www.carlofet.com/ and they start to become a lot more expensive and it will be cheaper to just buy a ready made screen. I also looked at certain custom boards and other materials and even managed to source Glass Sand-Blasting beads from Home Depot In the US but in the end all those options were a lot more expensive or labour-intensive and it simply didn't make sense to build a screen that was going to cost 100's of $$ and take a lot of my time when ready made screens are only a couple of hundred dollars more. If you absolutely have your heart set on going the route of building a painted screen then I would recommend looking at this how-to. http://makezine.com/projects/make-35/gl ... on-screen/ Also, you can get Glass Sand Blasting Media from Home Depot in the US. http://www.homedepot.com/p/BLACK-BULL-B ... /203494098
I used Black-Out Cloth screen material that was 62"x110"

3. Building Frame
I used wood (cheapest option) to build the frame but you can also use steel (very expensive) or wood on steel studs (cheaper). I used 2"x4" lumber which you can buy from Home Depot or Lowes. You should know your dimensions from using the above calculator. I would stay away from using 1"x4" as some of the instructions online will tell you to use. Once the frame is built, it bows quite badly since the wood is not strong enough to maintain a uniform shape once the screen material is fastened onto the frame. Also, some online instructions will tell you to mitre the corners but trust me, it's a pain to glue and fasten them and doing straight cuts will give you a stronger frame and it's easier to ensure that your frame is square that way.
I used 2 pieces of 2"x4" 108.625" long (remember to add an extra 4" to your cut length dimensions if you will be adding a 2" border all around the frame like I did) Viewable Width + Width of Border = 104.625" + 4" = 108.625"
and 4 pieces of 2"x4" 59.875" (you're subtracting 3" from your viewable height measurement from the calculator because of the width of the 2"x4" lengths that are going at the top and bottom of the frame. Also, remember you're adding 4" to you cut length dimensions if you will be adding a 2" border all around the frame like I did) Viewable Height - Width of 2"x4" lengths for top & bottom of Frame + Width of Border = 58.875" - 3" + 4" = 59.875". I used 4 pieces as I included 2 vertical supports to help with the structure of the frame. At the end of this you should have 2 long pieces that will form the top and bottom of your frame and 4 short pieces that will form the left and right of your frame and also 2 vertical supports that will be installed about a 1/3 of the length in from each end.
To join the frame pieces, I used wood glue and also pieces of 1/4" plywood cut into 1'x1' triangles. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg I found this to be easier than using 'L' or 'T' or right angle brackets although you can use those if you prefer. Using the plywood triangles also helped me to ensure that my frame was perfectly square. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg

4. Attaching Screen Material
This is either easy or very difficult depending on your skill level and is definitely a 2 or 3 person job. You need a good manual stapler or pneumatic stapler to do a good job and a lot of attention to detail and patience. I had a powershot stapler which I found inadequate to do the job and ended up buying this DeWalt stapler as it was on sale for $25 and surprisingly it turned to be a very good stapler. https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.4-in ... 92270.html I thoroughly cleaned/vacuumed the floor where I was going to work and since it was carpeted, I didn't bother to put down a plastic sheet as others will suggest online. I laid out the screen material and ensured that there were no wrinkles and then I carefully laid the wood frame on top of the screen material with the triangle side pointing up. At this point, you need to staple the top and bottom and left and right sides of the material to the top edge or back side of the frame. Do not staple the material to the front face of the frame as you will see the staples once you start projecting. You will need to stretch the material quite tight and I found that there is about 1"-2" of play in the material. Here is an example of the order in which to staple. http://joeandcheryl.com/wp-content/uplo ... canvas.jpg Make sure that you're pulling the fabric away from the direction in which you're working as you want to ensure that you're removing any wrinkles as you work your way around the frame. I found that having 2 people hold the frame upright while I stapled was the easiest way to do it and I ended up stapling every couple of inches all the way around. Also, you can overlap the material on the corners. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg I used a light hammer to ensure that the staples were sitting flat on the frame. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com ... screen.jpg Once you have completing stapling, the screen material should be taut all the way around the frame and should sound like a drum when you lightly tap it with your finger. This means that there is sufficient tension in the screen. At this point, you can carefully trim any excess material using scissors. Do NOT use a knife as you don't want to puncture your screen front.

5. Adding A Border
At this point, your screen is pretty much finished but I went the extra step of attaching a 2" border all the way around. This helps create a visual break and also helps with boosting contrast and the results are well worth it. You can order the proper black velvet tape online and it can be expensive but I found that Gaffer Tape can be used as well. There's a bunch of places in Toronto where you can buy Gaffer Tape. I bought mine from http://rotblotts.com/ You cannot use Black Duct tape or electrical tape as it needs to be a cloth tape and needs to be photo-absorbent as far as I know. I know some people have successfully used Black Cloth Hockey tape that you can buy from Canadian Tire or Home Hardware but it has issues with staying on the screen sometimes and Gaffer tape is a lot more adhesive and will stay on for the life of your screen without you having to worry about re-applying the tape like you do with Hockey tape.

6. Mounting Screen
Success! You screen is now ready for mounting! I used metal corner braces to mount my screen. https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.2-in ... 73675.html I screwed them into the wall first and then they attach to the sides and top of the frame at the corners and cannot be seen when looking at the screen. This gives the illusion that the screen is floating and also ensures that it is completely flush with the wall and is as close to the wall as possible.

I'm posting this all from memory when I built the screen during the holidays last year so if I've forgotten anything, I'll edit the post to add more information and also if you have any questions, please feel free to ask and I will respond accordingly.

Finally, please let me know if you find this information valuable and please feel free to link this post so that other people on RFD may be able to use this information. (Please don't do a copypasta as it took me a couple of hours to write this all up).

Also, please feel free to show your appreciation by hitting thanks or any other way that you like! LOL!
Thanks op. This will be my weekend. job. a lot of info...very useful stuffm
Deal Addict
Dec 29, 2005
1095 posts
41 upvotes
Mississauga
JohnS821 wrote:
Mar 4th, 2016 12:26 am
Thanks op. This will be my weekend. job. a lot of info...very useful stuffm
Want to help me build one? LOL...
Sr. Member
Feb 3, 2015
970 posts
186 upvotes
Toronto
imnew wrote:
Mar 4th, 2016 3:32 pm
Want to help me build one? LOL...
easy peezy man. All the info is there.
[OP]
Member
Dec 28, 2011
316 posts
135 upvotes
OAKVILLE
Jimboski wrote:
Mar 4th, 2016 4:03 pm
My DIY projector screen is roughly about 120 inches. We used paint, not cloth or anything like that.
You'll find that the picture quality will be a lot better with cloth rather than paint. I know lots of people who use a painted wall but when I was shopping for my projector, I saw the side by side comparison and was blown away at how much of a difference there was. The guy was using professional projector paint and everything but the cloth screen was still much better picture. Something to consider down the road perhaps if you ever think about changing your set-up.
Newbie
Nov 14, 2006
90 posts
22 upvotes
For those in the Toronto area: I recently upgraded to 115" DIY screen starting with MDF sheet. I bought mine from a place in Milton, but I stumbled across them and they don't normally stock it.

However, Commonwealth Plywood Distribution was my second choice, and had a few different options for 5ftx10ft (61"x121") MFD and Melamine panels, as well as Formica sheets. The 5x10 (1/2") MFD is $37.

[url]http://www.commonwealthplywooddistri...php?id=1000444[/url]

Note that these 5x10 sheets of MDF are really really really heavy at somewhere around 110 lbs. Also, the sheet didn't fit in my Grand Caravan, and i had to cut it to 57.0" wide to fit diagonally. Also, they are not flexible, and I 'almost' couldn't fit it down the stairs into the basement, even when cut to the 102" length I needed. This 57" height is still good enough for a 115" screen.

- After cutting, seal the MDF on both sides to keep it from warping in high humidity areas, and so that the paint topcoat doesn't suffer from moisture unevenly sucking into the panel
- I sprayed on two light layers of a simple water based drywall primer/sealer that i had on-hand. Some say to use oil primer, but I didn't want to buy it or deal with the issues that come with oil. I did NOT experience the surface roughening / bubbling that some fear from using water based primer on MDF.
- I used this thread as a guide for the painting. You have need to thin out the very thick paint to be able to spray it.
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/110-di...een-paint.html
- I ended up using a quart of Disney metallic from WalMart Canada ($22) with no tint, and the the Obsidian Glass grey colour (also from WalMart...CIL Dimension). I tried rolling first, but got roll marks. I then sprayed it on and am quite satisfied with the results.
Newbie
Jan 11, 2018
4 posts
Toronto, ON
Does gaffer tape stretch? The fabric I have is stretchy (which I want to decrease wrinkles) but I'm making my screen portable. So, I want to use the gaffer tape around the edge of the screen and then make grommet holes through the tape for the hooks. I'm just afraid the tape won't stretch like the fabric.
[OP]
Member
Dec 28, 2011
316 posts
135 upvotes
OAKVILLE
theOBP wrote:
Apr 24th, 2018 3:00 pm
Does gaffer tape stretch? The fabric I have is stretchy (which I want to decrease wrinkles) but I'm making my screen portable. So, I want to use the gaffer tape around the edge of the screen and then make grommet holes through the tape for the hooks. I'm just afraid the tape won't stretch like the fabric.
No, it does not. However, off the top of my head, I have seen some Hockey tape which is stretchy. You can pick some up at Canadian Tire. Alternatively, there are medical tapes that are quite stretchy that you could try and find at your local pharmacy or drug store.

The only problem I foresee with putting stretchy tape on your screen is that it will limit the way the screen stretches when putting it up and also unless you have stretched the screen out completely when putting it up, you will always have wrinkles in the tape. If I may ask, what is the reason for putting tape on your portable screen? Maybe, it would be better to just forget the tape. The Black border is not as important on a portable screen as I presume you will be using it outside and it will be night when you use the screen anyways so you will get the natural contrast anyways.

If you really want to have a black border then maybe build the frame and paint it black and have the screen attach on the back. The frame can easily be made to be portable. You can have the 4 pieces of the frame be separates and then assemble them with corner pieces whenever you want to use the screen.

LMK if you need more info.

Hope that helps! Good Luck!
Newbie
Jan 11, 2018
4 posts
Toronto, ON
jessagill wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 8:59 am
No, it does not. However, off the top of my head, I have seen some Hockey tape which is stretchy. You can pick some up at Canadian Tire. Alternatively, there are medical tapes that are quite stretchy that you could try and find at your local pharmacy or drug store.

The only problem I foresee with putting stretchy tape on your screen is that it will limit the way the screen stretches when putting it up and also unless you have stretched the screen out completely when putting it up, you will always have wrinkles in the tape. If I may ask, what is the reason for putting tape on your portable screen? Maybe, it would be better to just forget the tape. The Black border is not as important on a portable screen as I presume you will be using it outside and it will be night when you use the screen anyways so you will get the natural contrast anyways.

If you really want to have a black border then maybe build the frame and paint it black and have the screen attach on the back. The frame can easily be made to be portable. You can have the 4 pieces of the frame be separates and then assemble them with corner pieces whenever you want to use the screen.

LMK if you need more info.

Hope that helps! Good Luck!
Thanks for the info, jessagill!

The reason I want the tape is because I still need to put grommets in the screen. I'm afraid that the holes (where the grommets will be) will stretch open more easily, possibly ripping the screen material. I thought the tape may hold it together better.
[OP]
Member
Dec 28, 2011
316 posts
135 upvotes
OAKVILLE
theOBP wrote:
Jun 13th, 2018 9:30 am
Thanks for the info, jessagill!

The reason I want the tape is because I still need to put grommets in the screen. I'm afraid that the holes (where the grommets will be) will stretch open more easily, possibly ripping the screen material. I thought the tape may hold it together better.
OK, I see. That's completely different to what I was thinking. If you're just using the tape for where the grommet holes are, then it should be fine. You can also buy different widths of Gaffer tape as the wider one might be better suited to your use. Another alternative is to fold over the edge of the fabric by a couple of inches and create a much stronger edge all the way round. You can then insert the grommets into the edge and use the tape as well to make it stronger. Also, bear in mind that a portable screen is not even being stretched anywhere close to how much a permanent screen is being stretched so there shouldn't be that much stress on the grommets/holes.

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