Automotive

Do japanese cars like toyota and honda really hold up to their name in terms of reliability?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 7th, 2018 2:15 pm
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
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SW corner of the cou…
jackrabbit000 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2018 1:06 pm
x2. I have a 2006 Odyssey and was looking at the new 2018 and what a POS this thing is. The one in the showroom had just about every panel and door out of alignment. The door seals were all screwed up, some sticking out past the sheet metal and some all glued in the wrong place. The rear window was set in crooked, taillight on one side had a huge gap where the other side had none. We looked at 2 outside on the lot and they had the same issues and more.
So you're saying Billie Bob and Tommi Sue down in Alabama can' assemble cars even if everything is made to spec?
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
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Nov 8, 2017
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jackrabbit000 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2018 1:06 pm
x2. I have a 2006 Odyssey and was looking at the new 2018 and what a POS this thing is. The one in the showroom had just about every panel and door out of alignment. The door seals were all screwed up, some sticking out past the sheet metal and some all glued in the wrong place. The rear window was set in crooked, taillight on one side had a huge gap where the other side had none. We looked at 2 outside on the lot and they had the same issues and more.
Wow which dealer you can still find three new 2018 Odyssey???
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Apr 25, 2013
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thriftshopper wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2018 9:44 pm
So you're saying Billie Bob and Tommi Sue down in Alabama can' assemble cars even if everything is made to spec?
More like Tyrone and Yvonne,


Billie Bob and Tommi Sue are busy at home guzzling down a can of beer on welfare ! ...LoL
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Apr 21, 2004
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I think BEVs will throw reliability rankings around. Too much engine and transmission complexity to get 5-10% more MPG's on EPA testing.
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Bb0231 wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2018 10:32 pm
Watch this

Video title is bit misleading. I know this poster. Very good channel indeed but here he made an assumption that all accords from 2003 to 2007 had mass air flow sensor which is wrong.
The first year 2003 does not have one. They introduced it from 2004 onwards.
cheers
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Nov 13, 2002
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my opinion; less and less, but still way better than others. most cars will soon be made in china, they're just too efficient, no one will be able to compete, full automation.
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fakishan wrote:
Oct 6th, 2018 10:41 pm
my opinion; less and less, but still way better than others. most cars will soon be made in china, they're just too efficient, no one will be able to compete, full automation.
Actually under full or very heavy automation China is a less attractive place to make particularly heavy stuff like cars. In this scenario your main or primary human employees will be technicians and engineers who's main job is to keep the assembly line functioning and reprogramming it when you need to make changes ie. a different model. Also note a lot of 1st world countries still retain their auto manufacturing industries. Assembly line workers are the only ones where China can utilize lower labour costs, when you get to technicians and engineers they're not cheap even in China and you still have to deal with the issues shipping vehicles. You start running out of places to cut costs and at that point you might as well continue using either your major home country factories like the US, Germany, Korea or Japan or countries where the existing factories are closer to the intended destination for North America it will be US or Mexico. That's not to say a fully automated car plants will not have Chinese involvement but we're unlikely to see major changes in the current auto manufacturing landscape if heavy automation occurs soon. China is also not the only one who has to compete with lower labour on the car side, you got South Africa, Brazil, Thailand, Indonesia, Malayasia and so on. Even Chinese automakers assemble vehicles outside of China. Increasingly there will be no dominant auto building nation when heavy/full automated manufacturing occurs.

Other manufacturing where many countries have dropped those industries though can be a different story. In a automated scenario China could remain the world's factory on a very long term scale, and its wiser to make use of existing facilities rather than build new ones at home unless there's a great economic incentive.
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SW corner of the cou…
JeganV wrote:
Oct 7th, 2018 12:02 am
China is also not the only one who has to compete with lower labour on the car side, you got South Africa, Brazil, Thailand, Indonesia, Malayasia and so on. Even Chinese automakers assemble vehicles outside of China. Increasingly there will be no dominant auto building nation when heavy/full automated manufacturing occurs.
Cheap Chinese labour is running out, due to the one-child policy. The number of new workers entering the workforce annually has been shrinking as of the past few years and that is not going to change. China is trying to move up the productivity ladder and into high value-added production.
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
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Nov 8, 2017
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JeganV wrote:
Oct 7th, 2018 12:02 am
Actually under full or very heavy automation China is a less attractive place to make particularly heavy stuff like cars. In this scenario your main or primary human employees will be technicians and engineers who's main job is to keep the assembly line functioning and reprogramming it when you need to make changes ie. a different model. Also note a lot of 1st world countries still retain their auto manufacturing industries. Assembly line workers are the only ones where China can utilize lower labour costs, when you get to technicians and engineers they're not cheap even in China and you still have to deal with the issues shipping vehicles. You start running out of places to cut costs and at that point you might as well continue using either your major home country factories like the US, Germany, Korea or Japan or countries where the existing factories are closer to the intended destination for North America it will be US or Mexico. That's not to say a fully automated car plants will not have Chinese involvement but we're unlikely to see major changes in the current auto manufacturing landscape if heavy automation occurs soon. China is also not the only one who has to compete with lower labour on the car side, you got South Africa, Brazil, Thailand, Indonesia, Malayasia and so on. Even Chinese automakers assemble vehicles outside of China. Increasingly there will be no dominant auto building nation when heavy/full automated manufacturing occurs.

Other manufacturing where many countries have dropped those industries though can be a different story. In a automated scenario China could remain the world's factory on a very long term scale, and its wiser to make use of existing facilities rather than build new ones at home unless there's a great economic incentive.
Reminds me the production hell episode dreamed up by a so called "genius".

BTW, BMW and Audi are putting new plants in Mexico, not investing in fully robotic lines run by technicians and engineers.

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