Beauty & Wellness

Do you floss every day?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 1st, 2017 3:58 pm
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[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 4, 2010
14539 posts
1094 upvotes
Toronto

Do you floss every day?

If not, you should. Coworker told me my breath smells like crap.

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthrea ... =156076023

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That’s right, take a big whiff. If it stinks, you’ve got a problem.

So just why are we asking you to do this seemingly disgusting act of self-discovery? Because… It allows you to determine if you have gum disease. It’s common knowledge that when your gums bleed, you have gum disease, but what if they don’t bleed? Is there still a way to test the health of your gums?

You bet there is, and we call it the Road Kill Test. Wanna take a guess as to why?

It goes something like this.

Floss your teeth, making sure you get well below the gum line; not sure how to do that, watch this video. Then smell the floss exactly where you used it, before you move to a new position in the mouth, (floss- smell, floss – smell, etc…). If the floss smells like bloated Interstate carcass, it means that bacteria is growing and you’ve got leftovers below the gum line. It also means that you should be brushing and flossing more. Your floss should smell clean.

Bacteria will always exist in your mouth regardless of who you are, and how much you claim on your taxes. The problem arises when you miss some of this bacteria which inevitably finds its way into the sulcus; that little pocket just below the gum line. That little pocket is also why we want you to brush 45 degrees into the gum line instead of circles and up and down, and it’s why we made the MD Brush the way we did.

If you want to brush like a dentist, you have to think like a dentist. Buy your MD Brush today and master the ADA-preferred Bass technique.

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Be honest. Some people think brushing and mouth wash is enough. Get someone you're close with to take a whiff and be honest with you. lol
16 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
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City of Vancouver
No. But, I use a tongue scraper. I try to keep hydrated. High protein diets can cause breath problems, I heard.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
7335 posts
487 upvotes
Yes. My teeth are very tight and crowded so I floss every night before bed.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 4, 2010
14539 posts
1094 upvotes
Toronto
There is a stigma that no one should tell another person their breath stinks. It is almost like falling them a racial slur. Have you noticed this? People should just be more honest about their coworkers. I know between friends they just laugh it off bit it'd almost taboo at the work place instead they go around talking behind their backs.

In my searches I'm surprised many people do not floss or start only in their adulthood.
Deal Addict
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Jul 18, 2008
1026 posts
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Markham
I use Waterpik, not floss. But even then, I Waterpik every day.
Deal Guru
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Mar 14, 2005
11023 posts
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City of Vancouver
Supercooled wrote:
Feb 23rd, 2017 9:57 pm
There is a stigma that no one should tell another person their breath stinks. It is almost like falling them a racial slur. Have you noticed this? People should just be more honest about their coworkers...
It's up to their boss, family members, or their friends to tell them that their breath stinks. U should stay silent about it because people in general do not like criticism. It's considered bad manners.
Sr. Member
Aug 17, 2008
884 posts
271 upvotes
Becks wrote:
Feb 23rd, 2017 12:39 pm
No. But, I use a tongue scraper. I try to keep hydrated. High protein diets can cause breath problems, I heard.
Tongue scrapers may help with bad breath, but tongue scrapers do not help prevent gum disease. Flossing is essential to prevent gum disease.

Here's a good and easy to read article written by a dentist: "A Dentist's guide to oral hygiene". It provides a brief synopsis on how to use different products.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... al-hygiene

Some excerpts:
"I don’t care if you have won prizes for brushing, using floss or interdentals once a day reaches the parts brushes can’t reach. Bugs love crevices. (Crevice and tartar are the two words I feel most ridiculous saying out loud to patients.)"

"Finally, a newish thing is the tongue-scraper. The idea is that it removes the deposits on the tongue (I like to call this “munge”) that are thought to cause halitosis. Effectiveness? Jury is out."
Deal Fanatic
Sep 16, 2004
6767 posts
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Toronto
There have been recent articles that claim flossing is not all that effective.
That being said, interdental brushes have gained recognition.
http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/201 ... ctive.html
I still believe flossing is helpful and I floss everyday.
When I visit the Dental hygienist every 4 months, there's still work for the hygienist to do especially in the rear teeth.
Sr. Member
Aug 17, 2008
884 posts
271 upvotes
gh05t wrote:
Mar 14th, 2017 1:27 pm
There have been recent articles that claim flossing is not all that effective.
That being said, interdental brushes have gained recognition.
http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/201 ... ctive.html
I still believe flossing is helpful and I floss everyday.
When I visit the Dental hygienist every 4 months, there's still work for the hygienist to do especially in the rear teeth.
The problem seems to that the most people don't floss properly. So it's not that Flossing doesn't work, but flossing done improperly isn't effective. I personally find traditional "fine" floss to not be very effective; I find that the wide-flat floss, or the "weave" floss, are most substantial and more effective. Most people don't use floss properly (biggest failing is people don't go deep enough).

I also use interdental cleaners (no doubt they are easier to use than floss), AND i use a Water-Pik (although my water-pik has stopped working within the last week) because I know there is one spot where I need some extra attention (flossing doesn't always get to the crevices in one area). I did ask in the "Ask-a-Dentist" thread if dentists think Water-Pik can replace floss completely. Not sure if the Dentist will come back to his thread or not.
Deal Fanatic
May 2, 2009
6211 posts
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gh05t wrote:
Mar 14th, 2017 1:27 pm
There have been recent articles that claim flossing is not all that effective.
That being said, interdental brushes have gained recognition.
Switched to these a couple of years ago. They give a very clean mouthfeel. I buy them in the big triple pack at Costco for $9.99. Highly recommend them.

I also like the wider dental tape, but can't find it anymore.
Deal Addict
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Jun 20, 2010
1589 posts
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Newmarket
at least once a day.....sometimes more if food gets stuck, and my teeth feel grimy i'll brush and floss
i was also the only person at work that had a toothbrush and toothpaste, and would take care of it after lunch lol

i also have thankfully uneventful dental visits with cleaning twice a year....my new dentist seems to be really pro fluoride, and he can't believe that i have been using nature's gate toothpaste for years now with how healthy my teeth and gums are, but the other toothpastes just make my mouth gross and dry

it wasn't like this years ago....at one point in my life i had gum problems because i never had my teeth cleaned........this isn't something that was done at all in the old country (yugoslavia/serbia) so eventually that caught up with me, and when my gums started bleeding, and looking red and angry i went to see a dentist.......they had to schedule two cleaning sessions, both were almost an hour long, and i had to have some anesthesia ............it was freaking torture!
after that i learned my lesson, i was taught how to floss correctly, and also switched to an electric toothbrush........my routine has only improved, especially after i had invisalign for 8 months it's gotten to a point where i am now anal about my teeth

during the 8 months i had to brush and floss after eating before putting them back on as i was deadly afraid i would get cavities

so yeah........definitely floss, brush for two minutes with the electric toothbrush, and then brush again with ordinary brush after flossing

i also wear retainers when i go to bed so this is a must before going to sleep......seriously any dental pain scares the crap out of me, and i'll do whatever i can to avoid it....so far so good
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 9, 2007
7973 posts
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Toronto
I'm like him. Waterpik only.
mzkaye729 wrote:
Feb 24th, 2017 4:16 pm
I use Waterpik, not floss. But even then, I Waterpik every day.

WOULD SOMEBODY THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!!
Sr. Member
Apr 21, 2009
847 posts
284 upvotes
Toronto
I don't floss (mainly because I have braces) but I use one of those Oral B electric brushes which does a really good job of getting everything out. And I use a tongue scraper when I wake up and before I go to sleep.
Deal Addict
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Oct 1, 2011
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I floss nearly once every night. Sometimes if I've stayed up too late or am too exhausted, I merely brush + interdental brush, go to sleep (so I've skipped flossing for that day) and in the morning I will floss--on those days I end up flossing twice a day.

My mouth just feels a lot cleaner and fresher and I notice the difference when I've missed a floss, which I can't stand.
jelena-c wrote:
Mar 23rd, 2017 9:42 pm
...my teeth feel grimy i'll brush and floss
That's exactly the feeling I'm talking about. I notice that the grimy feeling comes on a lot quicker after eating sugary food/dessert, so although I don't brush right after every meal, I make sure to swish my mouth with water after something sugary. And floss (almost) every night before bed. :-)

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I do wonder if more research is needed into the gum sulcus development thing. I remember when I was a kid, my gums were really tight and it actually kinda hurt to floss; felt rather like flossing would be apt to create gaps over time than provide a benefit. The benefit to the habit came later, when I was in my teens.

There must be some sort of evolutionary way in which flossing wouldn't have been necessary--i.e. if more fibre and less sugar in hunter-gatherer diets didn't cause the development of gum sulci as quickly and therefore didn't necessitate flossing.
Newbie
Mar 29, 2017
2 posts
I do floss as my teeth are crowded. My dentist adviced me to floss every day.

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