Pets

Do you let your pets roam the house after being outside?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 14th, 2019 4:51 pm

Poll: Do you let your pets roam the house after being outside?

  • Total votes: 26. You have voted on this poll.
Yes
 
21
81%
No
 
5
19%
[OP]
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May 15, 2016
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Do you let your pets roam the house after being outside?

Just wondering.
25 replies
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Apr 25, 2011
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Why on earth not?! They're pets not livestock.

If they've dirty (by that I meam covered in mud/sand/dirt) ... something my highly active dog does almost daily, then quickly soak the feet or towel them off. If it's really bad then bath them with pet shampoo.

If you're only allowing them in the backyard or walking them on cement I doubt they are all that dirty.
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Sep 21, 2010
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Ah, I thought this was asking if you let your pets roam outside w/o any enclosures. I'm really curious why owners (esp of cats) let them wander around at risk.
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tranquility922 wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 3:50 am
I'm really curious why owners (esp of cats) let them wander around at risk.
Personal choice; quality over quantity of life. Sometimes it's not even a choice, the cat demands it and will stop at nothing to get outdoors.

In the UK it's unheard of to keep a cat indoors, they view it as inhumane and shelters may not adopt out if the cat cannot go outside.

One of my semi-feral cats which I tamed never would have allowed us keeping her indoors all day. The first time I lured her in the house and closed the door she went berserk immediately, like we were planning to kill her. We had to gradually get her used to coming inside for food with a dog door. She had free roam 24/7 and didn't even understand what a litter box was until she was much older. Despite being indoor/outdoor, she never roamed far and was usually found in the yard or neighbours garden during the day or on my bed at night (she could come and go at will but chose to come in and sleep with me).

She only really ventured from home when she would follow us on walks. She was terrified of cars. She was 110% indifferent to all but two humans; I always found it amusing watching random people walk by the house and try to call her over or approach her. Good luck there!! I didn't worry about her outside, she was smart. She lived to be somewhere over 20 and had a great life.

Some cats aren't so smart, and owners need to consider the pros and cons before allowing a cat outdoors.
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Karala wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 4:18 am
Personal choice; quality over quantity of life. Sometimes it's not even a choice, the cat demands it and will stop at nothing to get outdoors.

In the UK it's unheard of to keep a cat indoors, they view it as inhumane and shelters may not adopt out if the cat cannot go outside.

One of my semi-feral cats which I tamed never would have allowed us keeping her indoors all day. The first time I lured her in the house and closed the door she went berserk immediately, like we were planning to kill her. We had to gradually get her used to coming inside for food with a dog door. She had free roam 24/7 and didn't even understand what a litter box was until she was much older. Despite being indoor/outdoor, she never roamed far and was usually found in the yard or neighbours garden during the day or on my bed at night (she could come and go at will but chose to come in and sleep with me).

She only really ventured from home when she would follow us on walks. She was terrified of cars. She was 110% indifferent to all but two humans; I always found it amusing watching random people walk by the house and try to call her over or approach her. Good luck there!! I didn't worry about her outside, she was smart. She lived to be somewhere over 20 and had a great life.

Some cats aren't so smart, and owners need to consider the pros and cons before allowing a cat outdoors.
So it's an unavoidable risk as a cat owner, they must be permitted to go outside? That's kinda scary/sad if the worst case scenario happens.
The richest 1% of this country owns half our country’s wealth, 5 trillion dollars, one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons, and what I do.. <find the rest>
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tranquility922 wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 4:45 am
So it's an unavoidable risk as a cat owner, they must be permitted to go outside? That's kinda scary/sad if the worst case scenario happens.
In the UK they want them outside, I have realtives over there that think we're all crazy and/or cruel for keeping them inside. Over there it's what you do. Accept the risks for the greater benefit of allowing a cat to be a cat. It's a risk people are willing to take to make a cats life more enriched. It's just North America that veiws it as more culturally "bad" to allow a cat free roam. But whatever, most people I work with, including the vets, allow their cats outside.

While there are risks outside (cars, wild animals, cat-napping or transmittable diseases), there are risks inside as well. Namely, obesity leading to a hoast of issues. But also things like chewing on poisonous plants and electrical cords. Nothing in life is 100% safe.
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Jul 2, 2019
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Karala wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 5:18 am
In the UK they want them outside, I have realtives over there that think we're all crazy and/or cruel for keeping them inside. Over there it's what you do. Accept the risks for the greater benefit of allowing a cat to be a cat. It's a risk people are willing to take to make a cats life more enriched. It's just North America that veiws it as more culturally "bad" to allow a cat free roam. But whatever, most people I work with, including the vets, allow their cats outside.

While there are risks outside (cars, wild animals, cat-napping or transmittable diseases), there are risks inside as well. Namely, obesity leading to a hoast of issues. But also things like chewing on poisonous plants and electrical cords. Nothing in life is 100% safe.
Over half the cats in North America are obese/overweight, which can lead to many more health issues.
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Dec 14, 2006
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Kitchener
Worse case scenario sucks.

I grew up in the country and we had cats. Every now and then one just wouldn't come home and all we could do was assume it was coyotes or foxes. Had one that was gone for 8 months and then showed up a few days before we moved but that's another story. We ended up moving to the city and tried to keep them inside but we just couldn't. They would rip out screens to get outside.

They were all gone within a few weeks. The worst part is not knowing what happened to them but then also hearing stories of mutilated cats that were found and not knowing if they were yours or not. Still bothers me to this day and that was 17 years ago. Some people really suck.
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One of my cats is so docile, if he ever gets lost, he's gonna attach himself to someone and find a new owner Loudly Crying Face
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Sask.
Our cat is strictly an indoor cat. We do have a bylaw in our city that owners must keep cats inside.
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natalka wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 3:50 pm
Our cat is strictly an indoor cat. We do have a bylaw in our city that owners must keep cats inside.
How does it cope? Any prbs?

I guess I'll never be a cat owner, I wouldn't risk having it outside and rolling the dice. It's like letting your 3 yr old wander out and hoping they come back.
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Deans21 wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 11:45 am
Worse case scenario sucks.

I grew up in the country and we had cats. Every now and then one just wouldn't come home and all we could do was assume it was coyotes or foxes. Had one that was gone for 8 months and then showed up a few days before we moved but that's another story. We ended up moving to the city and tried to keep them inside but we just couldn't. They would rip out screens to get outside.

They were all gone within a few weeks. The worst part is not knowing what happened to them but then also hearing stories of mutilated cats that were found and not knowing if they were yours or not. Still bothers me to this day and that was 17 years ago. Some people really suck.
Whoa, I'd like to hear that story!
The richest 1% of this country owns half our country’s wealth, 5 trillion dollars, one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons, and what I do.. <find the rest>
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tranquility922 wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 3:54 pm
Whoa, I'd like to hear that story!
I guess it isn't much of a story really but ok.

We lived out in the boonies kind of in the middle of a forest. Our cats would disappear out into the woods and come home a few hours later with mice, voles, squirrels, etc. This one cat would disappear for increasingly longer periods of time though. One day my mom was over at the neighbor's house (about a km away or so) having lunch and the neighbor was like 'Oh there's that wild cat that comes around every so often'. She looked out the window and sure enough it was our cat just hanging out on the back porch. Another time he came home and smelled like men's aftershave or cologne so he was probably living a double life.

Eventually he just stopped coming home and we assumed the worst. I think it was October-ish when we noticed he hadn't been home in awhile and June when we moved. Because it was over the winter we figured he must have been gone but it's more likely he just stayed with someone else although he was quite a bit skinnier. We always left cat food on the back porch in case he ever found his way back and sure enough, three or four days before the final move, we see him eating on the back porch like nothing had happened. We moved him to the new house with us and there was just no way an outdoor cat like that was going to stay cooped up inside. He had disappeared in a week or two.

We don't know if he was hit by a car but we doubt it. We used to go on daily walks and drives around the neighborhood in hopes of seeing him somewhere but never did. It was about a month or two later that the reports of mutilated cats being found started coming out and it was close enough to our place that it made me suspect something. We also had a college and a high school nearby. He was so friendly and approached everyone so the thought of him innocently approaching someone and then suffering a fate like that still bothers me. I hope that's not what happened but I'll never know.
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Yep. I'm not sure what the alternate would even be? Keep them confined to a small space indoors after they come inside?
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natalka wrote:
Jul 5th, 2019 3:50 pm
Our cat is strictly an indoor cat. We do have a bylaw in our city that owners must keep cats inside.
Regina? That's the only place in Canada I could find with such an insane law.

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