Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Does it look bad to use a @gmail.com email address for your business?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 9th, 2017 11:02 am
Jr. Member
May 21, 2015
103 posts
17 upvotes
Vancouver
DiamondDallasPage wrote:
Aug 5th, 2017 1:35 am
What about lawyer? I know of someone who does criminal law and her email address on her card is ********keylimepie@hotmail.com.
better be the best defender of key lime's rights out there then
[OP]
Member
Sep 4, 2016
389 posts
110 upvotes
Okay, thankfully got a refund from GoDaddy on my 1yr of email - $81 back.

Whats the cheapest email hosting out there that is reliable enough? I know you usually get what you pay for.

I see bluehost is ranked #1 but they quoted me $77 for a year or $149 for 3. Not much cheaper at all.

1and1.ca is by far the cheapest at 99cents a month for 2Gb or $1.99 for 15gb but they have poor reviews.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 27, 2013
5822 posts
1920 upvotes
Toronto
Fallen_One wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 3:54 pm
Yes. It pretty much tells everyone you are amateur. I (personally) wouldn't ever give you money.

Buying a domain is like <$15 for the year, if you have a place to park it.
i dont know why you're getting down voted.

It's true, having a real domain does help. no matter how you look at it.

if you're good at what you do, then sure, gmail is cool. but, definitely doesn't look as professional.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 27, 2013
5822 posts
1920 upvotes
Toronto
DiamondDallasPage wrote:
Aug 6th, 2017 11:44 am
Okay, thankfully got a refund from GoDaddy on my 1yr of email - $81 back.

Whats the cheapest email hosting out there that is reliable enough? I know you usually get what you pay for.

I see bluehost is ranked #1 but they quoted me $77 for a year or $149 for 3. Not much cheaper at all.

1and1.ca is by far the cheapest at 99cents a month for 2Gb or $1.99 for 15gb but they have poor reviews.
honestly, in your quest to save $100 a year, you're wasting your time, when you should be focused on growing your business... yeah I get it, every dollar counts. but, spending money to get your name out there and look professional is worth it.

it's like penny wise, pound foolish. youre stressing over this domain name, and wasting time on it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 30, 2009
2289 posts
231 upvotes
Ottawa
daivey wrote:
Aug 6th, 2017 1:52 pm
i dont know why you're getting down voted.

It's true, having a real domain does help. no matter how you look at it.

if you're good at what you do, then sure, gmail is cool. but, definitely doesn't look as professional.
agree with you!
IT Services provider in Ottawa area.
[OP]
Member
Sep 4, 2016
389 posts
110 upvotes
daivey wrote:
Aug 6th, 2017 2:18 pm
honestly, in your quest to save $100 a year, you're wasting your time, when you should be focused on growing your business... yeah I get it, every dollar counts. but, spending money to get your name out there and look professional is worth it.

it's like penny wise, pound foolish. youre stressing over this domain name, and wasting time on it.
I bought my domain through godaddy, and just got my email hosting through Hawkhost. It's much cheaper than GoDaddy and I had a coupon as well that saved me 40%.

Now I am just trying to figure out how to set up the domain email through my gmail app and gmail browser.
Deal Addict
Feb 29, 2012
1800 posts
890 upvotes
Richmond
You can either have your Hawkhost email server forward mail to your Gmail account, or you can give Gmail your Hawkhost password and have it scan for new mail in your Hawkhost inbox periodically (see the Settings for either one).

Be careful when you Reply to email though. If you just Reply from Gmail, the recipient will see your Gmail address, not the same as the email address they initially sent their message to. You can have Gmail optionally use the name and email address of another account you own by going through an authorization process, but Google changed it last year so that it adds "via Gmail" that the recipient will see.

GoDaddy is an ok choice to get started with a domain, but you'll probably want to switch next year when they start gouging you for a lot more money on renewal. Google offers some less expensive domain registrations, and they throw in domain privacy for free to prevent being spammed as the listed domain rep. Namecheap is also less expensive than GoDaddy and typically gets good reviews.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
May 12, 2004
8938 posts
3041 upvotes
Ottawa
Depends greatly on your industry. I have about 80-100 business cards from various small construction contractors in my desk and 90% of them are @yahoo, @hotmail, @gmail or @outlook. 10% have their own domain. I'll pick one with a generic free email provider over a domain email just because I know he spends more time working on contracts (what I care about) than on his actual business ( I don't give a rat's ass about). That's just me...but I guess any other industry would be different.
Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak just because a baby can't chew it.
- Mark Twain
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2004
4486 posts
474 upvotes
I use Zoho for email. Same as gmail but for free.
[OP]
Member
Sep 4, 2016
389 posts
110 upvotes
Faith24 wrote:
Aug 8th, 2017 9:49 am
You can either have your Hawkhost email server forward mail to your Gmail account, or you can give Gmail your Hawkhost password and have it scan for new mail in your Hawkhost inbox periodically (see the Settings for either one).

Be careful when you Reply to email though. If you just Reply from Gmail, the recipient will see your Gmail address, not the same as the email address they initially sent their message to. You can have Gmail optionally use the name and email address of another account you own by going through an authorization process, but Google changed it last year so that it adds "via Gmail" that the recipient will see.

GoDaddy is an ok choice to get started with a domain, but you'll probably want to switch next year when they start gouging you for a lot more money on renewal. Google offers some less expensive domain registrations, and they throw in domain privacy for free to prevent being spammed as the listed domain rep. Namecheap is also less expensive than GoDaddy and typically gets good reviews.
Honestly, I think I will just pay GoDaddy's prices and use them for email hosting. There is a reason why they are one of the more expensive.

I've wasted 3 hours with Hawkhost and Scalahosting email support trying to find instructions on how to get my domain email setup on my Gmail browser on my PC and then on my Android phone. You would think something like this should be so simple right? Nope. GoDaddy has instructions all on their website. Also No phone support by either of these providers so you have to deal with emails back and fourth and tickets. Annoying. I wasted 2 hours in an email chat window with Scala last night only to find out that you can't install domain emails on Android. Really?! Oh, and you can't install domain emails in the Gmail browser. You have to use Outlook or webmail or some other 3rd party email app like Squirrel Mail or Horde.

So they tell me to do email forward, so I do this, I set it up so my domain emails get copied to another inbox of mine, blah blah blah, but it's just not the same as having a completely seperate account altogether. When you reply to emails, you can't reply from your domain email because the account isn't even on your phone! What good is that?

(Before cancelling with GoDaddy), I believe I had my domain email fully set up and working on BOTH my phone and PC in less than 5mins. I should have not cancelled it.

You get what you pay for.
Deal Addict
Feb 29, 2012
1800 posts
890 upvotes
Richmond
If your host provides a POP/SMTP server, which I believe they all do, you can use any email client you want to read and reply to your email. That includes the built-in email apps of Android and iOS. You would only use a webmail app like Squirrel or Horde if you want to access your email in a web browser.

There is a learning curve to getting set up with a domain and a web host or email host. Most of the providers are rock-bottom cheap and provide little support, and as usual most instructions assume that you have some degree of knowledge already, Fortunately most follow pretty common standards such as using an Apache Linux hosting package with Cpanel user interface, so you can find ample support on the web. I can understand wanting to minimize your time spent, but it's a one-time learning curve, probably well worthwhile.
[OP]
Member
Sep 4, 2016
389 posts
110 upvotes
Faith24 wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 10:15 am
If your host provides a POP/SMTP server, which I believe they all do, you can use any email client you want to read and reply to your email. That includes the built-in email apps of Android and iOS. You would only use a webmail app like Squirrel or Horde if you want to access your email in a web browser.

There is a learning curve to getting set up with a domain and a web host or email host. Most of the providers are rock-bottom cheap and provide little support, and as usual most instructions assume that you have some degree of knowledge already, Fortunately most follow pretty common standards such as using an Apache Linux hosting package with Cpanel user interface, so you can find ample support on the web. I can understand wanting to minimize your time spent, but it's a one-time learning curve, probably well worthwhile.
I see where you are coming from, but it would be nice if these companies could at the very least list instrutions on how to set up email on phones, etc, (and easily found) on their site without having to contact email support.

This is twice now that two companies system completely messed up in getting my domain name wrong and my postal code wrong. So then I have to go back and fix it after the tech support lets me know.

You get what you pay for. I know this is a one time process but seriously it should not take hours to get an email account set up.
Deal Addict
Feb 29, 2012
1800 posts
890 upvotes
Richmond
Having spent years dealing with hosting companies, I could not have a lower opinion of their technical competence and customer service. It's an industry-wide problem. The only counter is to have some knowledge of your own, and if it's for business then pay for a second backup service that you can switch over to rapidly in the event of problems.

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