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Dog with recurring bladder stones

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  • May 17th, 2018 8:52 pm
[OP]
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Sep 18, 2017
201 posts
216 upvotes
Vancouver

Dog with recurring bladder stones

Our family dog of 16 years had bladder stone removal surgery about 2 years back to get them removed, because it had gotten to the point where the stones were lodged in his uretha. The vet did the surgery and showed us the x-rays afterwards that showed all the stones were gone. Fast forward to yesterday and he wasn't feeling well, so I brought him to the vet to get checked. During the x-ray, it was shown that a big bladder stone had formed again. This time it was significantly bigger than usual because this was just one big stone. The previous ones were several smaller ones.

We've had him on a special ROYAL CANIN Urinary SO diet that's supposed to help with bladder stones. He eats a mixture of the wet and kibble combined. Since he's so old, the vet suggested that it would be very taxing on his body to perform another bladder stone removal.

My question is how the hell is this happening when he's on a special diet? Is there anything that I can do on top of feeding him the special diet that could help with some sort of dissolving of the big stone?
7 replies
Jr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
124 posts
41 upvotes
kaiseki wrote:
May 11th, 2018 2:04 am
Our family dog of 16 years had bladder stone removal surgery about 2 years back to get them removed, because it had gotten to the point where the stones were lodged in his uretha. The vet did the surgery and showed us the x-rays afterwards that showed all the stones were gone. Fast forward to yesterday and he wasn't feeling well, so I brought him to the vet to get checked. During the x-ray, it was shown that a big bladder stone had formed again. This time it was significantly bigger than usual because this was just one big stone. The previous ones were several smaller ones.

We've had him on a special ROYAL CANIN Urinary SO diet that's supposed to help with bladder stones. He eats a mixture of the wet and kibble combined. Since he's so old, the vet suggested that it would be very taxing on his body to perform another bladder stone removal.



My question is how the hell is this happening when he's on a special diet? Is there anything that I can do on top of feeding him the special diet that could help with some sort of dissolving of the big stone?
It's important to find out what type of stones, but if they are struvite stones, you should measure urinary pH of dog to make sure pH is between 6 and 7, and if it is higher, you can give DL-Methionine powder to lower urine pH. It would also be healthier to switch to a frozen raw food diet instead of the Royal Canin along with the DL-Methionine if needed. Also make sure your dog drinks a lot of water.
[OP]
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Sep 18, 2017
201 posts
216 upvotes
Vancouver
I will double check with the vet as to which type or bladder stones he currently has. I just dropped off a jar of his urine for a urinalysis today, so they're supposed to get back to me with the report tomorrow.

We always have a full bowl of fresh water available for him at all times, but whether he drinks it is another issue.

I've never heard of the Methionine powder, but from my limited research on it right now, it seems like most pet owners with bladder stone issues swear by it.
Jr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
124 posts
41 upvotes
kaiseki wrote:
May 12th, 2018 2:21 am
I will double check with the vet as to which type or bladder stones he currently has. I just dropped off a jar of his urine for a urinalysis today, so they're supposed to get back to me with the report tomorrow.

We always have a full bowl of fresh water available for him at all times, but whether he drinks it is another issue.

I've never heard of the Methionine powder, but from my limited research on it right now, it seems like most pet owners with bladder stone issues swear by it.

It's really important to find out what kind of stone, since another common type is calcium oxalate stone, and you have to do the exact opposite- alkalinize the urine by giving the dog potassium citrate. I think your dog has struvite stones since that diet your vet is giving is meant for that type.
Jr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
124 posts
41 upvotes
And ways you can get dog to drink more water include mixing the dog food with water so that the dog has to lap up the dog food with water. You can also mix in broth with his water to entice him to drink it.
[OP]
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Sep 18, 2017
201 posts
216 upvotes
Vancouver
The vet said that the urinalysis came back saying that he has calcium oxalate dihydrate in his urine and his pH level is at 6. He said that since his pH level is around 6 then DL-Methionine isn't necessary for him.

Seems like the only method of action at this point is to continually take him out for more frequent pees to help minimize the amount of urine crystal build up in his bladder and to do another bladder stone removal if any of them get lodged in his urethra again.

I will try adding some chicken broth to his water and hope he drinks more water because of it. Time to buy some chicken bones to boil off.
Deal Addict
Jul 11, 2010
1142 posts
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Toronto
We had the same problem with our male cat. We now give him special urinary food but always fill the bowl with water also. So far we have not have any more problems. He has learned to drink the water if he wants his food.
Jr. Member
Aug 1, 2006
124 posts
41 upvotes
If it's oxalate stones, you shouldn't need that special veterinary diet. Switch your dog to a frozen raw dog food, eg. NatuRAWls from Global Pet Foods, or Big Country Raw delivery to your house. Also buy your dog a doggy probiotic that contains lactobacillus and bifidobacterium species. Definitely don't give DL-methionine since that acidifies the urine, and you want to make the urine more alkaline. If you need a supplement, you would give potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine, eg to pH 7 from pH 6.

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