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Dog settling in Vancouver

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 26th, 2017 10:55 pm
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[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes

Dog settling in Vancouver

Moving with my dog from Asia to Vancouver in March, she's a 7 lb mixed Pomeranian. Unless something goes wrong with her, I don't plan to take her to the vet right away.

Except applying for a dog license online, what else is required? I've read the Ongoing anti-flea med is a must I'd assume? I'd love to take her with me for short hikes and road trips after settled.

Anything specific for dogs that I should be aware of in Vancouver?
24 replies
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
No vaccinations are required by law in BC but if you are going hiking I would consider Distemper, Lepto and Lyme vaccinations.

Fleas are not a concern here until Spring and Summer although some people do give flea treatments year-long to be on the safe side or if they take their dog to doggy daycare etc.

A few nice dog off-leash areas in the lower mainland:

Burnaby Fraser Forshore Park - Lots of off-leash trails and some open areas as well along the river.

Fraser River Park - Great off-leash area with both fields and beach (I really like this one).

MacDonald Beach - Huge long stretch of beach waterfront that's off-leash (I personally find there are too many out of control dogs here).

3 Road Dog Park (Richmond) - A nice off-leash area along the dyke, many walk past the leash-up area another 10 minutes or so and you find yourself at a second dog park along the dyke so it's a two parter. If you do not leash-up be careful as there's barbed wire fencing along the farm fields you're walking past.

Blackie Spit Park/Crescent Beach - Two separate fenced off-leash areas, one on the water (although not that large). The one on land only is by the tennis courts and mostly sand, but there's a covered area if it's raining and a treed area as well. There's also a neat grassy area that has a maze like quality that my dogs have a blast trying to find me in.

Lighthouse Park - Huge off-leash rainforest trails with great lookout views along the ocean, all off-leash!

Spirit Park - Some forested trails here are off-leash in the heart of Vancouver but not all the park is so it is a bit annoying to navigate.

Lynn Headwaters Regional Park - Lower falls trails is all off-leash and a fantastic hiking spot. I love it.

Crystal Falls - An off-leash hike to a waterfall. I found there was too much garbage left around though.

Quarry Rock - Fairly short off-leash hike with a great view. Takes about 2 hours total.

North 40 - A fairly large off-leash area, used to be an old army base many years ago so you can see housing foundations. A lot of movies and TV series are filmed here. A fair number of eagles though...

Everette Crowley Park - Some nice forested trails off-leash. Not all is off-leash so it is a little annoying navigating.

Cypress Falls - All off-leash but poorly marked bush trails for the most part... I never did find the waterfall.

Spanish Banks Beach - There is a section of this beach for dogs off-leash. Nice way to spend a lazy summer day.

Buntzen Lake - Have not been here myself but it sounds like a nice large off-leash area is included for dogs.

Hayward Lake - Have not been here either but I hear it is off-leash. Alas, closed for at least the next year for BC Hydro upgrades I believe but something to keep bookmarked.

And lastly a bonus option, Centennial Beach. It is technically on-leash however come when the tide is out and it stretches for miles with little warm water pools everywhere and you can easily be off by youself not impeding anyone. Gorgeous location and everyone has their dogs off-leash below the tide line (where I believe city has no control on bylaws).

Welcome to Vancouver. :)
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes
Karala wrote:
Jan 24th, 2017 10:30 pm
No vaccinations are required by law in BC but if you are going hiking I would consider Distemper, Lepto and Lyme vaccinations.

Fleas are not a concern here until Spring and Summer although some people do give flea treatments year-long to be on the safe side or if they take their dog to doggy daycare etc.

A few nice dog off-leash areas in the lower mainland:

Burnaby Fraser Forshore Park - Lots of off-leash trails and some open areas as well along the river.

Fraser River Park - Great off-leash area with both fields and beach (I really like this one).

MacDonald Beach - Huge long stretch of beach waterfront that's off-leash (I personally find there are too many out of control dogs here).

3 Road Dog Park (Richmond) - A nice off-leash area along the dyke, many walk past the leash-up area another 10 minutes or so and you find yourself at a second dog park along the dyke so it's a two parter. If you do not leash-up be careful as there's barbed wire fencing along the farm fields you're walking past.

Blackie Spit Park/Crescent Beach - Two separate fenced off-leash areas, one on the water (although not that large). The one on land only is by the tennis courts and mostly sand, but there's a covered area if it's raining and a treed area as well. There's also a neat grassy area that has a maze like quality that my dogs have a blast trying to find me in.

Lighthouse Park - Huge off-leash rainforest trails with great lookout views along the ocean, all off-leash!

Spirit Park - Some forested trails here are off-leash in the heart of Vancouver but not all the park is so it is a bit annoying to navigate.

Lynn Headwaters Regional Park - Lower falls trails is all off-leash and a fantastic hiking spot. I love it.

Crystal Falls - An off-leash hike to a waterfall. I found there was too much garbage left around though.

Quarry Rock - Fairly short off-leash hike with a great view. Takes about 2 hours total.

North 40 - A fairly large off-leash area, used to be an old army base many years ago so you can see housing foundations. A lot of movies and TV series are filmed here. A fair number of eagles though...

Everette Crowley Park - Some nice forested trails off-leash. Not all is off-leash so it is a little annoying navigating.

Cypress Falls - All off-leash but poorly marked bush trails for the most part... I never did find the waterfall.

Spanish Banks Beach - There is a section of this beach for dogs off-leash. Nice way to spend a lazy summer day.

Buntzen Lake - Have not been here myself but it sounds like a nice large off-leash area is included for dogs.

Hayward Lake - Have not been here either but I hear it is off-leash. Alas, closed for at least the next year for BC Hydro upgrades I believe but something to keep bookmarked.

And lastly a bonus option, Centennial Beach. It is technically on-leash however come when the tide is out and it stretches for miles with little warm water pools everywhere and you can easily be off by youself not impeding anyone. Gorgeous location and everyone has their dogs off-leash below the tide line (where I believe city has no control on bylaws).

Welcome to Vancouver. :)
It's a very nice welcome from you to a new comer! I've already bookmarked the information and try out each of them.

For now, I only pray my dog sits well for her flight which is 24 hours with transit time. *sigh*
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
I thought it would be nice and helpful. Some websites list if a dog is allowed off-leash but often there isn't enough detail on the actual location. And a few I listed I only know about because I have friends that go everywhere with their dogs (I'm not much better haha).

There are of course many many more off-leash areas but I believe I've highlighted some of the best ones -- saves you the trouble of driving somewhere only to find it was a waste of time.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes
Karala wrote:
Jan 25th, 2017 11:26 am
I thought it would be nice and helpful. Some websites list if a dog is allowed off-leash but often there isn't enough detail on the actual location. And a few I listed I only know about because I have friends that go everywhere with their dogs (I'm not much better haha).

There are of course many many more off-leash areas but I believe I've highlighted some of the best ones -- saves you the trouble of driving somewhere only to find it was a waste of time.
I plan to take my dog everywhere with me at least the first week upon our arrival (don't want her to get too anxious with the new place). However, the first week is the busiest in which I need to have phone, bank account, ID setup. Let alone I can't take her to the restaurants/grocery stores, I can't take her to the malls/banks too. That's said, do you know how people take leaving the dog in car while I run those errands? I think at most 30 mins each time.

I know it's not against the law to leave the pup in the car as long as it's not hot but I also know some people are highly against it regardless and will give the owner a hard time when return to the car. What's the norm in Richmond?
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
I would aim for as short as possible trips away from the car. We leave our dogs in the car without trouble (they are quiet and just intently look out the windows for us) but I do know of others that have run into trouble even if they have AC on or if they've only been gone a few minutes (including a veterinarian getting a lecture from some random person when her dogs were completely fine haha).

Just depends on who is passing by the car I guess. Right now it isn't too cold or too hot so I wouldn't stress too much about running into people complaining as long as your dog doesn't howl while you are gone.
Member
Oct 3, 2013
253 posts
143 upvotes
BC
To add onto the above, for majority of the year, leaving your dog in the car in Richmond isn't an issue. Only on abnormally hot/cold days or the summer months (+/-) does it become an issue.

It's as simple as: if you could be comfortable in the car with no A/C or heat with 1-2 layers for 20-30 mins, it's okay to leave your dog for errands here and there.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
Yeah, realistically leaving your dog in the car is fine all year long besides the summer heat (summer mornings and evenings would likely be fine) and the winter is not even that cold but I cannot guarantee you will not still have complaints from passersby which is why I advised not being gone too long.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes
Not sure how my dog will react in her first days in Canada. If worse comes to worst, is putting her with day care the best option available? Do you have any reliable day care to recommend?
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
Your dogs personality will depend on if daycare is a good option - does your dog have separation anxiety? Does your dog get along well with other dogs? Does your dog do well in strange environments? Some dogs do best home alone, others do best at daycare, others would just need someone to drop by and walk them while the owner is gone.

If you are thinking a long-term option I would likely look into finding someone trustworthy that has a smaller group of dogs they care for rather than an actual daycare that has 20+ dogs at a time. It's very chaotic there and they likely won't get as much supervision or as much time out and about at daycare.

For just the first few days if you cannot take your dog with you the best option would be leaving them at home to get them used to their new home in peace and quiet, though.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes
Karala wrote:
Jan 26th, 2017 11:26 am
Your dogs personality will depend on if daycare is a good option - does your dog have separation anxiety? Does your dog get along well with other dogs? Does your dog do well in strange environments? Some dogs do best home alone, others do best at daycare, others would just need someone to drop by and walk them while the owner is gone.

If you are thinking a long-term option I would likely look into finding someone trustworthy that has a smaller group of dogs they care for rather than an actual daycare that has 20+ dogs at a time. It's very chaotic there and they likely won't get as much supervision or as much time out and about at daycare.

For just the first few days if you cannot take your dog with you the best option would be leaving them at home to get them used to their new home in peace and quiet, though.
When I first adopted my dog 1.5 years ago, she barked a lot for the first 2 weeks while leaving her home alone and eventually got better. Now, I can leave her by herself 10 hours alone at home with no problem. So, I'm pretty sure she'll be fine after the first month.

That's said, I am not sure how she's adopting to the new environment in Vancouver. Thinking she might bark at a lot at the beginning and result in neighbours' complains. Well, can only worry so much. See how the first week unfolds for us.

Thank you for your information, it's very helpful!
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
598 posts
92 upvotes
Toronto
Being a 7 lb Pom, I'd stay far away from any off-leash parks. My brother's dogs went with him to HK from Canada. No issues at all.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes
NubNub wrote:
Jan 27th, 2017 6:11 pm
Being a 7 lb Pom, I'd stay far away from any off-leash parks. My brother's dogs went with him to HK from Canada. No issues at all.
Thanks! Good to know.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
670 posts
233 upvotes
British Columbia
NubNub wrote:
Jan 27th, 2017 6:11 pm
Being a 7 lb Pom, I'd stay far away from any off-leash parks.
While it is a personal choice to visit dog parks, when a dog is small this is certainly part of the equation.

Does your dog have a good recall and does it like larger dogs are important aspects along with you the owner being vigilant -- scouting to make sure there are no rough playing dogs ahead (and to just avoid certain breeds in general like Huskies and German Shepherds) and also stepping in if either your dog or another dog is playing too rough.

I visit dog parks all over the place and safely see dogs of all sizes interact, I see Poms and Chihuahuas and Yorkies. My dogs are both under 20 pounds as well, one of them usually plays too rough with small dogs so I direct her to play with dogs somewhat larger than herself. She's rough and tumble like that, but not all little dogs are.
[OP]
Member
May 3, 2016
226 posts
16 upvotes
Karala wrote:
Jan 28th, 2017 12:03 pm
While it is a personal choice to visit dog parks, when a dog is small this is certainly part of the equation.

Does your dog have a good recall and does it like larger dogs are important aspects along with you the owner being vigilant -- scouting to make sure there are no rough playing dogs ahead (and to just avoid certain breeds in general like Huskies and German Shepherds) and also stepping in if either your dog or another dog is playing too rough.

I visit dog parks all over the place and safely see dogs of all sizes interact, I see Poms and Chihuahuas and Yorkies. My dogs are both under 20 pounds as well, one of them usually plays too rough with small dogs so I direct her to play with dogs somewhat larger than herself. She's rough and tumble like that, but not all little dogs are.
It will be interesting to see how my pup, a city dog, is adapting to her new life in Vancouver. Wondering if she needs to learn "English" to talk to dogs in Vancouver. haa.a..

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